Whitehall and Downing Street, London

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Whitehall, SW1

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    Gates of Downing Street
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    Cenotaph at night
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  • deeper_blue's Profile Photo

    Downing Street

    by deeper_blue Updated Aug 21, 2010

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    You can step outside the 2nd most well known address in the UK and perhaps get a glimpse inside. Downing Street is home to the British Prime Minister. It has seen many great leaders come and go Thatcher, Chamberlain, Churchill, Blair...

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    Horse Guards

    by DEBBBEDB Updated Jul 24, 2010

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    Daughter being eaten by Guard's horse
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    Trooping of the Colours is done on the Queens Birthday in June. When we were here in December of 2009, it was cold and rainy so the guard had a nice red raincoat. We didn't try to see a Changing of the Guard

    When my grandfather was here in 1950 it was nicer weather (photos 2 and 3) and when I was here in 1976 (photos 4 and 5) it was in October, but was still nicer weather. Those photos were probably taken at the changing of the guard

    There is a ceremonial Mounted unit stationed at Knightsbridge barracks, London at the HCMR (Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment). The ceremonial uniform of the Household Cavalry has two features that are not often seen on other soldiers. They wear a shiny brass helmet, with a long "plume" of horse hair hanging from the top. When on mounted guard duty they also wear a "cuirasse" (metal chest armour). The Life Guards wear red tunics with white plumes. (You can see the uniform detail better on my grandfather's photo #2.) While on guard, the soldiers carry swords. When mounted on horses, the soldiers wear white riding-breeches, known as buckskins, and tall black winged leather boots, which are called jack boots, having been "jacked" or reinforced against sword blows

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  • mirchica's Profile Photo

    Downing street

    by mirchica Written Jun 27, 2010

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    Downing street is in Whitehall, starting from The houses or Parliament and it’s also not very far from The Buckingham Palace. The street was made in 1680 on the place of an estate called Hampden Home. Now it is an important street because of the location of the residence and the office of the First Lord of the Treasury in UK.

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    Horse Guard Houses

    by mirchica Written Jun 27, 2010

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    At the ground of the horse guard we can shoot to the personal guards of the queen - gvar-
    players in colorful dress uniform and give guard, standing stationary on their horses. We also wanted to make fun with one of them and a friend acted that he’s going to enter the house so the guard started to shout something and all the kids that were there taking photos jumped and ran away.

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    From Downing St. to Picadilly Circus

    by mindcrime Updated Mar 21, 2010

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    horse guard
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    Now, you can walk on Downing St. At n.10 is the home of the prime minister (Tony's away now!). Traditionally, this is the place that the prime minister lives and next to him the minister of economy. The huge bars wont allow you to get near the building, so take a pic of the corner sign (pic 2)

    Anyway, in the middle of the avenue you can see the Cenotaph(pic 3), it's the monument for the unknown soldier, something very typical all over europe with most of them erected after WWI. Just a few meters away is another monument (pic 4), this one is about the women during WWII.

    You can see the horse guards (pic 1) if you walk up the Whitehall road. There is a small ceremony every day (time varies). At the end of the road is Trafalgar square(National gallery is there). Then you can walk to Picadillly Circus where you can see the Love's Statue(pic 5). It's a meeting point for many people but believe me it's not romantic at all, I can see it's the most busy part of London with noise and 125 tourists in every square meter :) Add to this all the dirt, the fast food chains etc and you will understand why I dont like this area during daytime.

    But Picadilly tube station is there. Go inside and choose another area.

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    Banqueting House

    by Durfun Updated Dec 9, 2009

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    The Grand ceiling
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    This is the only intact and remaining part (though modified) of the former Whitehall Palace. Whitehall was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698.

    It has stunning ceilings (painted by Rubens) and a lovely roof, well worth seeing. However, please ring the number to check there are no functions held, as it is a popular venue for various events.

    There are several roof paintings put together. Two canvasses measure 28x20ft and two others 40x10ft.

    Outside is the site where Charles I was executed on Tuesday, 30 January 1649, around 1400 hours. The King was led through the Banqueting House to a scaffold erected outside in Whitehall.

    On the 6th February, 1649, the monarchy was abolished. Parliament stated that "the office of the king in this nation is unnecessary, burdensome and dangerous to the liberty, society and public interest of the people."

    Monday-Saturday: 10.00-17.00, Adults: 4.80UKP

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    Royal Horse Guards

    by Anjin-san Updated May 14, 2009

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    Changing of the Royal Horse Guards at Whitehall
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    Horse Guards stands on the site of Henry VIII's tournament ground or 'tiltyard'. Nearby is a remnant of the 'real tennis' court where Henry is said to have played the forerunner of modern lawn tennis.
    The elegant buildings of Horse Guards were designed by William Kent and completed in 1755.
    Horse Guards originally was the main entrance to Buckingham Palace and royal processions travelling through Whitehall still pass under the arches of the building.
    The Old Treasury, and the back of the Dover House, dating from 1758, are also by Kent.
    The parade ground of Horse Guards is dominated by the ivy-covered Citade, a.bomb-proof structure built beside the Admiralty in 1940. During World War II it was used as a communications headquarters by the Navy.
    The Household Cavalry mounts the guard here (10.00 - 4.00 pm daily). The Changing of the Guard takes place everyday, when the Household Cavalry rides from Hyde Park, via The Mall, to Whitehall for the 11.00 am changeover.

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    The Cenotaph

    by uglyscot Written Mar 30, 2009

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    The Cenotaph
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    The Cenotaph in Whitehall, London has been the site of the Remembrance Service for the past ninety years. Originally intended as a small part of the Peace Day events of July 1919, The Cenotaph was designed and built by Edwin Lutyens at the request of the then Prime Minister Lloyd George .It was originally a wood and plaster construction intended for the first anniversary of the Armistice in 1919. When it was unveiled its base was covered in wreaths to the dead and missing from The Great War. The public were so enthusiastic that it was decided that The Cenotaph should become a permanent and lasting memorial. The present structure is made from Portland stone, and was unveiled in 1920. The inscription reads simply "The Glorious Dead".
    On the Sunday nearest to 11 November at 11am each year, a Remembrance Service is held at the Cenotaph to commemorate British and Commonwealth servicemen and women who died in the two World Wars and later conflicts. The queen, religious leaders, politicians military leaders attend. After hymns and prayers, a two minute silence is observed. Official wreaths are laid on the steps of The Cenotaph. The ceremony ends with a march past of war veterans..

    A few yards along the road is a black monument to Women who died in the war, and a statue of Haig who led the British army in France.

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    Changing of the Horse Guard

    by TexasDave Written Dec 12, 2008

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    Horse Guards Entrance
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    Everyone knows about the changing of the guard at Buckingham Palace. At the same time (11:00 every day except Sunday, 10:00) a detachment of the horse Guards is being changed out. The advantage of the Horse Guard's ceremony is that you can get closer to the action, and, especially for kids, there are large black horses involved.

    To see the ceremony you have to walk through the iron gates between the two guards on duty on Whitehall. In the back there is a large parade grounds where everything takes place.

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    Banqueting House

    by TexasDave Updated Dec 9, 2008

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    This is the smallest and least expensive of the Historic Royal Palaces and is passed over by many tourists simply because they don't know what it is when they walk past and it isn't emphasized in many tour guides. It is the only remaining building of what was Cardinal Wosley's townhouse (originally called York Place) which Henry XIII took over and converted into his Pleasure Buildings and eventually covered 23 acres. It was used in the early 1600's by Charles I to host elaborate "Masques" which were part dramatic play, part formal ball, for the nobles. It was also where Charles I was executed in 1649.

    The most interesting feature of the Banqueting House today is the ceiling which has several paintings on canvas by the famous Flemish painter Rubens. Two of them measure 20 X 28 ft!
    They were installed in 1636 and have been there ever since.

    An audio guide is available and gives detailed information of the whole building and the beautiful paintings.

    Admission is 4.50 pounds for adults, 2.25 children 5-16.

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    changing guardsmen

    by ukirsari Updated Dec 5, 2008

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    horseyguard man (c) ukirsari

    apart of changing guardsmen which held in buckingham palace, watching the 'ceremony' at the whitehall, house of the guards is one of our favourite things during in london.

    i like the guardsmen' parade with their unique uniform in buckingham palace. but in whitehall, the horse-guards looks so gorgeous.

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    cabinet war rooms. ready to attack!

    by ukirsari Written Dec 5, 2008
    cabiner war rooms (c) ukirsari

    again, i got my dad's influence at this point. another of his british idols is sir winston churchill. so here we are. visit cabinet war rooms. a museum dedicated to churchill's role during the world war II.

    cabinet war rooms is annexed to prime minister's residency at downing street nr 10. it's a bunker where churchill stay when the war spread out through europe.

    how serious but funny and witty sir churchill was, can be seen by photographs and memorabilia. such as a bloody big map of europe with sketches of adolf hitler made from pencil at the center. or, churchill's hobby to witnessing the bombardier of london city by enemies from atop of his bunker! another fine example is a description about churchill's collection: maps. so, different with other people who like to put wallpaper on, he prefer to cover his bedroom with maps. he can still learn before fallen asleep.

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    Churchill Museum and War Rooms

    by karenincalifornia Written Nov 16, 2008

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    Churchill Museum

    The Churchill Museum is just off Whitehall. It provides an excellent history of Churchill's life, his living and working arrangements during WWII and his life afterwards. You can see the maps rooms, Churchill's bedroom, Mrs. Churchill's bedroom, and the super secret secure green phone. This is a must for all war buffs. It definitely holds interest for everyone else, too.

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    Political London

    by cheezecake_deli Updated Oct 14, 2008

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    The street where Tony lived

    Whitehall, a broad road that connects Trafalgar and Parliament Squares, lies at the heart of political London. Located along it are several imposing government buildings, including the Treasury, Foreign and Commonwealth Office and Horse Guards Building. Downing Street, home of the Prime Minister, is also located off Whitehall, but is off limits to the general public. You can just about steal a glance, past the barricade, of No. 10 - maybe you'll see Gordon Brown if you're lucky (or should I say if he's lucky).

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    Horse Guards

    by mallyak Written Sep 19, 2008

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    Horse Guards stands on the site of Henry VIII's tournament ground or 'tiltyard'. Nearby is a remnant of the 'real tennis' court where Henry is said to have played the forerunner of modern lawn tennis.

    The elegant buildings of Horse Guards were designed by William Kent and completed in 1755.
    There is a crowd of people creating chaos to have aphoto taken with the Gaurds.some have no respect and stick their tongue out which I think is very wrong.do be carefu-horse kick and bite!!
    The Household Cavalry mounts the guard here (10.00 - 4.00 pm daily). The Changing of the Guard takes place everyday, when the Household Cavalry rides from Hyde Park, via The Mall, to Whitehall for the 11.00 am changeover

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