Whitehall and Downing Street, London

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Whitehall, SW1

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    Downing Street
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    monument for the WWII women
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  • Anjin-san's Profile Photo

    Royal Horse Guards

    by Anjin-san Updated May 14, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Horse Guards stands on the site of Henry VIII's tournament ground or 'tiltyard'. Nearby is a remnant of the 'real tennis' court where Henry is said to have played the forerunner of modern lawn tennis.
    The elegant buildings of Horse Guards were designed by William Kent and completed in 1755.
    Horse Guards originally was the main entrance to Buckingham Palace and royal processions travelling through Whitehall still pass under the arches of the building.
    The Old Treasury, and the back of the Dover House, dating from 1758, are also by Kent.
    The parade ground of Horse Guards is dominated by the ivy-covered Citade, a.bomb-proof structure built beside the Admiralty in 1940. During World War II it was used as a communications headquarters by the Navy.
    The Household Cavalry mounts the guard here (10.00 - 4.00 pm daily). The Changing of the Guard takes place everyday, when the Household Cavalry rides from Hyde Park, via The Mall, to Whitehall for the 11.00 am changeover.

    Changing of the Royal Horse Guards at Whitehall Changing of the Royal Horse Guards at Whitehall Changing of the Royal Horse Guards at Whitehall Changing of the Royal Horse Guards at Whitehall Changing of the Royal Horse Guards at Whitehall
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    The Cenotaph

    by uglyscot Written Mar 30, 2009

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    The Cenotaph in Whitehall, London has been the site of the Remembrance Service for the past ninety years. Originally intended as a small part of the Peace Day events of July 1919, The Cenotaph was designed and built by Edwin Lutyens at the request of the then Prime Minister Lloyd George .It was originally a wood and plaster construction intended for the first anniversary of the Armistice in 1919. When it was unveiled its base was covered in wreaths to the dead and missing from The Great War. The public were so enthusiastic that it was decided that The Cenotaph should become a permanent and lasting memorial. The present structure is made from Portland stone, and was unveiled in 1920. The inscription reads simply "The Glorious Dead".
    On the Sunday nearest to 11 November at 11am each year, a Remembrance Service is held at the Cenotaph to commemorate British and Commonwealth servicemen and women who died in the two World Wars and later conflicts. The queen, religious leaders, politicians military leaders attend. After hymns and prayers, a two minute silence is observed. Official wreaths are laid on the steps of The Cenotaph. The ceremony ends with a march past of war veterans..

    A few yards along the road is a black monument to Women who died in the war, and a statue of Haig who led the British army in France.

    The Cenotaph monument for women Field Marshall Haig sign
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    Changing of the Horse Guard

    by TexasDave Written Dec 12, 2008

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    Everyone knows about the changing of the guard at Buckingham Palace. At the same time (11:00 every day except Sunday, 10:00) a detachment of the horse Guards is being changed out. The advantage of the Horse Guard's ceremony is that you can get closer to the action, and, especially for kids, there are large black horses involved.

    To see the ceremony you have to walk through the iron gates between the two guards on duty on Whitehall. In the back there is a large parade grounds where everything takes place.

    Horse Guards Entrance Old Guard Waiting to be Relieved New Guard Entering New Guard Waiting to Take Over
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  • ukirsari's Profile Photo

    changing guardsmen

    by ukirsari Updated Dec 5, 2008

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    apart of changing guardsmen which held in buckingham palace, watching the 'ceremony' at the whitehall, house of the guards is one of our favourite things during in london.

    i like the guardsmen' parade with their unique uniform in buckingham palace. but in whitehall, the horse-guards looks so gorgeous.

    horseyguard man (c) ukirsari
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  • cheezecake_deli's Profile Photo

    Political London

    by cheezecake_deli Updated Oct 14, 2008

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    Whitehall, a broad road that connects Trafalgar and Parliament Squares, lies at the heart of political London. Located along it are several imposing government buildings, including the Treasury, Foreign and Commonwealth Office and Horse Guards Building. Downing Street, home of the Prime Minister, is also located off Whitehall, but is off limits to the general public. You can just about steal a glance, past the barricade, of No. 10 - maybe you'll see Gordon Brown if you're lucky (or should I say if he's lucky).

    The street where Tony lived
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    Horse Guards

    by mallyak Written Sep 19, 2008

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    Horse Guards stands on the site of Henry VIII's tournament ground or 'tiltyard'. Nearby is a remnant of the 'real tennis' court where Henry is said to have played the forerunner of modern lawn tennis.

    The elegant buildings of Horse Guards were designed by William Kent and completed in 1755.
    There is a crowd of people creating chaos to have aphoto taken with the Gaurds.some have no respect and stick their tongue out which I think is very wrong.do be carefu-horse kick and bite!!
    The Household Cavalry mounts the guard here (10.00 - 4.00 pm daily). The Changing of the Guard takes place everyday, when the Household Cavalry rides from Hyde Park, via The Mall, to Whitehall for the 11.00 am changeover

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    White Hall and 10 Downing Street

    by mallyak Written Sep 19, 2008

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    Number 10, as it is often known, is perhaps the most famous address in London and one of the most widely recognised houses in the world. The centre of the United Kingdom government, it is the Prime Minister's home and place of work with offices for secretaries, assistants and advisors. There are also conference rooms and dining rooms where the Prime Minister meets and entertains other leaders and foreign dignitaries. The building is near the Palace of Westminster, the home of Parliament, and Buckingham Palace, the residence of Queen Elizabeth.
    After the 1991 bombing, security at Number 10 was enhanced. An iron gate now blocks access to the street; visitors can only view the Prime Minister's residence from a distance, as seen in the photos.

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  • Horse Guards

    by Mariajoy Updated Feb 16, 2008

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    Hasn't everyone got one of these on their London page??? We were just passing through.... and I just thought "oh well... might as well take a pic now I am here..." I mean some people visiting London go out of their way to see these guys sitting here for hours on end.. they are trained not to make eye contact with tourists!!! Poor horse is bored witless, 'cos if it thought about it for just a nano-second he would think.... "hey I could just rush this lot... chuck lardarse off my back and be in St James Park having a dip in the lake rather than stand here with these irritating tourists all day!!". But horses don't really think too much.... they are so gorgeous they just behave and do as they are told... bless.

    Go on Dobbin!... make a run for it!!!

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  • Jim_edmonds177's Profile Photo

    Whitehall

    by Jim_edmonds177 Written Dec 20, 2007

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    This was surely a place that me and Dennis both adored, we loved it so much that we came back again and again. British art and history that you read and see on television, you hear about it from so many sources yet when you see it with your own eyes, the thousands of years that have gone and the history that has been preserved. Be sure to check out http://www.number-10.gov.uk for awsome info and to know more about planning out your activities in the area.

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    Horse Guards Parade

    by clouds111 Written Nov 9, 2007

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    Once the tiltyard of Whitehall Palace, where jousting tournaments were held in the time of Henry VIII. The Horse Guards Parade is now notable mainly for the annual Trooping the Colour ceremony, in which the Queen takes the Royal Salute, her official birthday gift, on the second Saturday in June.

    The current Horse Guards building dates from the mid-eighteenth century.

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    Admiralty citadel

    by clouds111 Written Oct 23, 2007

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    The former Admiralty citadel can be found on the north side of Horse Guards Parade. It was constructed in 1940-1941 as a bomb-proof operations centre for the Admiralty. Now covered in ivy if you look closely you'll see the small windows intended as firing positions. The concrete roof made 6 metres thick is covered in grass so it would be missed during air attacks in the 2nd World War. It is also thought to have a secret tunnel connected with Buckingham Palace in case of evacuation.

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    Household Cavalry

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Jul 6, 2007

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    As we walked from Westminster Abbey toward Trafalger Square, we passed Horse Guards Parade in the Whitehall area. Two mounted members of the Household Cavalry were performing guard duties at the sidewalk entrance to the the Parade, and they had a good crowd of tourists around them jostling for position. I walked inside the gate a short distance and found another dismounted trooper on guard with various tourists posing beside him for photo opportunities (second photo).

    The Horse Guards Parade was built in 1745 and is where the daily changing of the guard ceremony takes place for the troops who provide protection for British Royalty when they are in London. The Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment is made up of a squadron from each of the two senior cavalry regiments of the British Army. One squadron is drawn from The Life Guards (shown here with their scarlet tunics and white helmet plumes) while the other is from The Blues and Royals with their blue tunics and red plumes.

    A mounted Life Guard on sentry duty A Life Guard of the Household Cavalry
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    Jewel Tower

    by lonestar_philomath Updated Apr 2, 2007

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    Jewel Tower was built in 1365 to house Edward III’s treasures. It was only one of only two buildings of the original Palace of Westminster to survive the fire of 1834. It is now a museum displaying a history of ‘Parliament Past and Present’.

    There is an entrance fee of 2.90 for adults, and 1.50 for children (in pounds). Free to members of the English Heritage.

    Survivor of the original Palace of Westminster. map
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  • viddra's Profile Photo

    Horse Guards

    by viddra Written Feb 28, 2007

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    Horse Guards are elegant buildings designed by William Kent and completed in 1755 to house the old palace guards.

    The guards are changed every hour on the striking of the clock.

    Horse Guards is also the setting for the Trooping of the Colour by the Queen’s personal troops on her Majesty’s official birthday (6 June).

    horse guards
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  • rochellevm's Profile Photo

    House of the Prime Minister

    by rochellevm Written Dec 1, 2006

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    No. 10 Downing Street is supposedly the official residence of the Prime Minister of England. You can also view it from the gates, as tourists are also not allowed to get inside. Nothing much to see though, so just pass by the area if you happen to be near, but not on purpose as you may just be disappointed.

    No. 10 downing street
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