Getting Around London

  • London Underground
    London Underground
    by Twan
  • easyjet on the way to London
    easyjet on the way to London
    by mindcrime
  • Flights
    by machomikemd

Most Viewed Transportation in London

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Parking in London

    by machomikemd Written Aug 4, 2015

    There are many parking areas in london of which many are owned by the national government via National Car Parks and other hosts of Private Parking Companies of which they have parking areas in many tourist attractions such as Oxford Street, Park Lane, Soho, Leicester Square, Trafalgar Square, Chinatown, Knightsbridge and a lot more. The streets of london also have parking areas that are available from 8.30am and 6.30pm Monday to Saturday via Pay and Display (wherein you pay for the parking slot for a number of hours via automated parking machines at the street and display the printout in the front dashboard of your car. Parking in parking areas are expensive, costing from GBP 5 to GBP 25 per hour! plus an 11.50 GBP congestion Charge during weekdays from monday to friday!

    It is better to ride the tube or public bus or go via a tour rather than renting a car in london!

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Singles
    • Business Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    How To Buy Eurostar Tickets

    by machomikemd Written Jul 20, 2015

    If you are planning to go to Continental Europe like for Say have a day off to Paris or to Brussels or will go on a continental tour of Europe starting in either paris or Brussels, then you can Buy Eurostar Tickets a number of ways like buying it in advance online at their website and then printing the ticket with barcode in advance. you can also buy the tickets at their ticket counters located inside the Sain Pancras Station manned by sellers or via the Various Automated Ticketing Machines located in several areas of the Saint Pancras Station.

    Train fares vary according to the day and time of departure (holidays and weekends are more expensive) and where the destination is, like for example, if you are travelling round trip from London to paris, the ticket price can be from 92 GBP to 132 GBP for a round trip ticket to paris using the economy class and up to 254 GBP is travelling via Business Premier.

    Just be sure to bring your passport as you will be travelling abroad and you will pass two immigration counters in the Eurostar Terminal (The British and the French) an the obligatory security check for baggages.

    The Eurostar Train service start from 5:40 am to 8:00 pm everyday at Saint Pancras Station

    Eurostar operates 18 trains plying the St Pancras International in London, with the other British calling points being Ebbsfleet International and Ashford International in Kent. Calais-Fréthun and Lille in France, of which trains to Paris terminating at Gare du Nord. Trains to Belgium terminate at Midi/Zuid station in Brussels.

    .

    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Food and Dining
    • Business Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Eurostar Trains to Paris and Brussels

    by machomikemd Updated Jul 14, 2015

    Although the opening of the Channel Tunnel enabled trains to go to and from England to France since 1994 of which Eurostar Pioneered, it reached greater heights when it transfered it's London Main Line at Saint Pancras Station in 2007 and then newer high speed trains now clock at 300 kilometers per hour of which you can reach Gare du Nord in Paris from Saint Pancras Station in just two hours and 40 minutes and the Brussels Midi Station in just two hours and 50 minutes (and vice versa) this new high speed train service practically decimated the Dover-Calais Ferry Service that was usually done both by locals and tourists going from england to the mainland europe as this was only slightly more expensive than the channel ferry but it only takes you just over two hours to reach paris or brussels unlike practically the whole day if using the Channel Ferry.

    Eurostar operates 18 trains plying the St Pancras International in London, with the other British calling points being Ebbsfleet International and Ashford International in Kent. Calais-Fréthun and Lille in France, of which trains to Paris terminating at Gare du Nord. Trains to Belgium terminate at Midi/Zuid station in Brussels.

    Train fares vary according to the day and time of departure (holidays and weekends are more expensive) and where the destination is, like for example, if you are travelling round trip from London to paris, the ticket price can be from 92 GBP to 132 GBP for a round trip ticket to paris using the economy class and up to 254 GBP is travelling via Business Premier.

    The Eurostar Train service start from 5:40 am to 8:00 pm everyday at Saint Pancras Station

    you can buy tickets online or at the Saint Pancras Station. Bring your passport as you are technically entering french territory once after british immigration at the station of which the british and French Immigration lie meters from each other.

    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Luxury Travel
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Saint Pancras International Railway Station

    by machomikemd Updated Jul 14, 2015

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Besides Victoria Station, Waterloo Station, Paddington Station, Liverpool Station, which are the Biggest Train Stations (more than 10 rail lines) on London Metropolitan Area, Saint Pancras International Railway Station is among the Busiest and is the only Railway Station that is connected to Mainland Europe via the Eurostar Railwork which runs from London to Paris and Brussels. And this Victorian Era Train Station is the main Point of Entry and Exit for Millions of both locals and tourists going to and from London to the European Continent and vice versa (like us) as it is more convenient than riding a hydrofoil from dover to calais in france which take the whole day going from london to paris (and is just slightly more expensive) or riding an airplane from london fo paris (takes more time and more expensive as you need to be at the airport for 3 hours before the flight and then a long wait at immigration and baggage claim) as it only take 3 hours and 15 minutes from London to Paris and 3 hours and 25 minutes to Brussels.

    The Station serves both Domestic British Trains and the Eurostar Trains and was built in 1868. currently it has 14 railways to and from Points in the United Kingdon and France and Belgium and there are various shops and restaurants and coffee shop inside this sprawling train station plus it is connected via a long subway tube to the Kings Cross Station so you can access the London Tube easily from here.

    address: Euston Rd, London N1C 4QP, United Kingdom

    platform inside near the king's cross station eurostar inside
    Related to:
    • Business Travel
    • Food and Dining
    • Luxury Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • gwened's Profile Photo

    Heathrow inter terminal travel

    by gwened Updated Jun 7, 2015

    http://www.heathrowairport.com/heathrow-airport-guide/travel-between-terminals#table
    take buses on small planes and hook up on big planes but lately is been buses to terminals. You have connections at above links on inter terminal travel.

    Its easy indeed, just follow the signs.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • iaint's Profile Photo

    Gatwick Airport (LGW)

    by iaint Written Mar 5, 2015

    Most visitors to London think of Heathrow Airport (LHR) as the arrival/departure point, but in fact another 4 airports serve the city.

    Gatwick is the second largest after LHR. It lies to the south of the city, in Sussex.

    In the past it was mostly used by charter companies - either they couldn't get landing slots at LHR or they were too expensive. Now it is much more diverse.

    Scotland has had scheduled flights to LGW for decades, going back to the days of British Caledonian in the 80s. Now it is easyJet and BA which serve the Scottish market out of LGW.

    LGW has 2 terminals, linked by a rail shuttle. The shuttle also connects the North Terminal with the railway station (see upcoming tip on Gatwick Express) at the South Terminal.

    I'd always rate LGW as more user friendly than LHR as it's smaller, but it used to be the number and frequency of flights was lower and so flexibility was more limited. That may be less so with BA and easyjet serving LGW.

    Like most UK airports and all the London ones except City, it has a run down, scruffy feel to it as compared with (say) Amsterdam, Brussels or Paris.

    wishful thinking more wishful thinking
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Business Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • planxty's Profile Photo

    I'm glad I did it - but only once

    by planxty Updated Dec 1, 2014

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As part of the whole hype surrounding the 2012 London Olympics and Paralympics, those of us who live in London were treated to a new mode of transport which was slightly unusual for a non-mountain location and notable for several reasons. It is the Emirates Airline, and herein lies the first interesting fact. It is the first portion of the Transport for London (TfL) portfolio that is commercially sponsored, this time obviously by Emirates Airlines. Prior to this the only time any TfL, formerly London Regional Transport (LRT) station or route had been named for a brand was many, many years ago. If you are ever at Arseenal Station on the Underground, have a look at the platforms on the walls. The delightful tiling clearly states Gillespie Road but the station name was changed to reflect the proximity of Arsenal Football Club who now play at what is the Emirates Stadium. Seems Emirates have some pull in this city.

    To the Air Line itself. It is effectively a cable car running across the Thames from North Greenwich, close to the O2 arena to the Docklands area of Royal Docks in the East End. Before we go on, I should tell you that I do not like exposed heights and the concept of hanging suspended on a wire high above certain death is not high on my lists of things to do. So how did I end up there? Well, thanks to VT actually. During the weekend of the annual VT Treasure Hunt in 2012, myself and the other members of the London-Calling VT group had decided not to be very prescriptive about the events for Sunday and a few of the members had decided to meet up at North Greenwich at lunchtime after the actual Treasure Hunt on the Saturday.

    Perhaps I just was not paying attention as usual, which seems likely, but I really wasn't aware of what the plans were. I know London pretty well, I had got to the start point quite happily on the Tube and I was merely there in a capacity of having a little knowledge of the capital. I had nothing planned for the day, and wherever the visiting members wanted to go I was pretty sure I could get them to and show them round. The concept of a very large and terrifying cable car ride really didn't enter my mind. We all met up and I got some nice photos of the nearby O2, formerly the white elephant known as the Millenium Dome (which I am still paying for from my taxes, thanks Mr. B. Liar (not a typo)). So far, so good.

    At that point Lesley, VT member Roam, casually mentioned that the plan was to cross the river on the Air Line. Hmm. I had looked at it and already thought, "I don't fancy that much". However, the Air Line is all too easy to get on, especially if you have an Oyster card as I and most Londoners do. It actually works out cheaper using one rather than paying at the kiosk so before you knew it I had touched in (you place your electronic card on a reader and it debits you the fare), and was standing in what didn't even amount to a queue waiting to get onto an extremely frail looking gondola that was going to take me "high over London" (to borrow a phrase from a Jimi Hendrix song).

    High over London is indeed the phrase to employ here. After the efficient and friendly operator had seen us into the car, made a joke about not closing the door (which, at that point, I found about as funny as root canal work) and we were off. No turning back now. Initially, the car just goes up. Up, up and always further up. I have subsequently found out that it rises (dependent on tides) no less than 177 feet above the river. This, frankly, is far higher than I like. Let's be honest, I get a nosebleed climbing a stepladder. The fact that some of the members were moving about to get good photos and making the thing sway ever so slightly did nothing to alleviate my natural disinclination to be that high. I know Lesley has a wonderful photo of me sitting looking absolutely petrified, and I was.

    In fairness, the views are nothing short of specatacular. To the rear (crossing as we did South to North) you have a magnificent overview of the O2, the whole of Greenwich and down to the Thames Barrier. In front of you, the Olympic Park, Docklands, Canary Wharf etc. are all clearly visible. Thankfully, it was a very clear autumnal day when we were there. I did not take a lot of photographs. Sheer, blind terror kept me immobile and rooted to my seat most of the time. However, for those of you not cursed with my fear of heights, it really would be a superb experience, and relatively inexpensive, and I would certainly recommend it. If you compare it to the London Eye, which I think is horribly overpriced and overhyped (yes, I was talked into that folly as well), it is a wonderful experience with lots of wonderful photo opportunities. The staff are excellent, friendly and well turned out (TfL take note) and it really should be on everyone's list of London "things to do". Unless of course, you don't like heights, in which case, get the Tube!

    To the practicalities now, and I would direct you to the attached website for this, it is rather comprehensive. Walk-up prices are a little steep at £4:30 single (£2:20 child) but with the Oyster Card it is £3:20 single and £1:60 child. As I have mentioned, this is a monumental saving on the London Eye and will give you a great view of an area of London less-visited but well worth looking at. Despite my personal nightmare, I really would recommend it, just don't ask me to go and get some more photos!

    Emirates Air Line, London, UK. Emirates Air Line, London, UK. Emirates Air Line, London, UK. Emirates Air Line, London, UK. Emirates Air Line, London, UK.
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • planxty's Profile Photo

    It's a bit different.

    by planxty Updated Apr 19, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Update April 2014.

    Readers of my pages will know that I like to keep them as up to date as possible and so I offer the following nformation. Following a fire on one of the vehicles in late September 2013, the company is temporarily offering land-only tours whilst the relevant authorities conduct investigations. Fortunately, nobody was seriously hurt but a number of people were taken to hospital as a precaution.

    The attached website is suggesting a possible return to river service as of 8th May 2014 but without the river element, the whole mainstay of this attraction seems to have been removed. Certainly, it is a novel way to travel round central London but I don't think it justifies the expense for a journey you oculd do with the same results on a hop-on hop-off bus, cheaper still normal public buses or cheapest of all walking which is my preferred option for seeing central London anyway. I shall attempt to keep this tip up to date as things progress.

    Original Tip.

    This has to be one of the more obscure modes of transport amongst the many to be found in London. They are converted DUKW landing craft, as used in the Second World War, and are some sort of weird hybrid of road vehicle and boat.

    The tour lasts about 70 minutes, starting at Chicheley St. Waterloo (behind the London Eye). They take in such sites as the Houses of Parliament, Buckingham Palace, the Tate Gallery, Trafalgar Square and Westminster Abbey before taking to the water and finally ending up back at the start point.

    It has to be said, it's not cheap at £17:50 for adults and £12:00 for children, but it has to be one of the more unusual ways of seeing the sights.

    Duck vehicle, London.
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • gwened's Profile Photo

    Disneyland to London

    by gwened Updated Sep 20, 2013

    My pennies input is on public transport take the eurostar direct disneyland to london pancreas

    http://www.eurostar.com/static/micro_site/eurostar_london_to_disneyland_paris.htm

    IN case the days are not good for you above schedules, you can take the TGV changing at Lille or straight to Paris and take the RER A train

    you can always catch a shuttle to disneyland from Opéra ,2 Rue des pyramides or 8 pl de l'Opéra, Gare du nord, 8 blvd de Denain,, madeleine on 3 blvd Malesherbes, and Châtelet on 12 avenue victoria (pl du châtelet)
    http://disneylandparis-express.com/

    disneyland bus
    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Theme Park Trips
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • davidjo's Profile Photo

    MINICABS

    by davidjo Written Nov 29, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    MINICABS are cheaper than taxis but bookings must be made by telephone as they are not allowed to pick passengers up from the street like a regular London Taxi. The fare is a greed in advance and a record is kept. You could be putting yourself in danger if approached by an unregulated car on the street, and it would also be illegal. Most pubs, hotels restaurants deal with a certain minicab company and will be pleased to order one for you. It is normal for these establishments to get commission from the minicab companies.

    minicab office

    Was this review helpful?

  • davidjo's Profile Photo

    BIG BUS TOURS

    by davidjo Written Nov 18, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Big Bus Tours offer an ideal way to see the London sites, as you can hop on or off at 50 different stops. During the tour you can have live commentary or recorded commentary as well as 4 walking tours and a trip on the river Thames, and vouchers for restaurants and shops. Tickets are a hefty £29 and £12 for children.

    open top bus tour

    Was this review helpful?

  • angiebabe's Profile Photo

    the new Emirates cable car from Excel to O2 venues

    by angiebabe Written Sep 8, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Opened in time for the 2012 Olympics here in London this is an exciting new tourist attraction providing another opportunity for great views over London and the Thames.

    The cable car links the major venues of the Excel centre and the O2. The Excel centre is accessed by the DLR lines with the closest stations being Custom House, Prince Regent and West Silvertown - which is a lovely walk around the waters of the docklands to the cable car station.

    Payment is best using Oyster card which gives a discounted fare 'of £3.20 for adults and £1.60 for children as opposed to paying by cash at £4.30 and £2.20. There is also a reduced rate for multiple journeys.

    cable car over the O2/millenium dome view from West Silvertown DLR station
    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Photography
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • gwened's Profile Photo

    We drove and more!!! London

    by gwened Written Jul 22, 2012

    well been coming here for a few years now, the last time decided to bring the family and drove the car again from Versailles to Earls Court area of London. Avoided the congestion charge by parking at the exhibition center parking lot for a negotiated deal lol!

    We took the eurotunnel to bring the car over under the manche, channel, again this is very easy prebook trip and nice ride,flowless. I ride all the time on business and have n account with them
    http://www.eurotunnel.com/fr/home/
    so with the family was a breeze..easy. You come out already on the British left side driving and was not notice at all. You get there from France on the A16 exit 42 and follow signs. From London you come near Folkestone. The exit is at the junction of the 11A and the expressway M20 that takes you with signs to registration area.

    You can use the route planners like viamichelin,mappy,or google to guide you in ,to me its already registered... I followed the direction of Heathrow airport on the M25 and then get around to come back side to Earls Court on the M4 becoming A4 by west Cromwel road. Take right on Earls Court Road, then right again on old Brompton road, and then right on warwick road to cnter. If not able to park on the exhibition center on the negotiated price, I do park nearby at Seagraves road, there is a parking there with an Avis car rental lot, but you can park too, the rates online from the exhibition center will cut the cost in half.
    http://www.eco.co.uk/p/parking/173

    Then once in London, take the tube, easy and gets you all over, we have the oyster card, recharge and kept forever, mine is 8 years old lol! Plenty to choose in the official transport site in contact here are the choices
    http://www.tfl.gov.uk/gettingaround/default.aspx

    and you have the journey planner that guides you where you want to go; with a tube map that is all you need and you are all set. http://journeyplanner.tfl.gov.uk/user/XSLT_TRIP_REQUEST2?language=en

    Here you have the info about the oyster card
    http://www.tfl.gov.uk/tickets/14825.aspx

    this section tells you about the congestion charge in case you want to park closer to the city, not needed thus with the tube.
    http://www.tfl.gov.uk/roadusers/congestioncharging/default.aspx

    and here you have the airport site, I give you the two i used the most often and never a problem to get the latest info.
    http://www.londonnet.co.uk/ln/guide/resources/airports.html
    and the official visit london
    http://www.visitlondon.com/travel/airport/

    For those with the eurostar train service here is the info taken it but not my preferred mode to come here
    http://www.eurostar.com/dynamic/_SvBoExpressBookingTerm?_TMS=1342957545082&_DLG=SvBoExpressBookingTerm&_LANG=UK&_AGENCY=ESTAR&country=UK&lang=UK&VT=EB

    travel info from gare du nord in Paris to St Pancreas in London
    http://www.eurostar.com/UK/uk/leisure/travel_information.jsp?rfrr=UK%3AUK%3AexpressBook_body_travelinformation

    our line Piccadilly line on the tube/metro/subway we started from here at Earls Court my old reliable oyster card
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Trains

    Was this review helpful?

  • fabric_letters's Profile Photo

    Walk where you can....

    by fabric_letters Written May 26, 2012

    Judge you distances, Some of the time it takes longer to get the tube from once place to the other and theres alot of walking up and down. Walking from one land mark to the other will give you chance to see alot more of the city and round every corner there will be something of interest.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • PeterVancouver's Profile Photo

    Thames Fast Ferries

    by PeterVancouver Updated Apr 16, 2012

    An excellent way to get around in London especially if your hotel is out in the East of the City is by way of Thames Clippers.

    Outside of rush hour there is a huge amount of room to move about in with food and drinks on offer during the day.

    They are part of the Oyster card programme so you dont even have to use credit cards or buy tickets before boarding.

    We were staying at a Holiday Inn Express Hotel out not far from the Docklands and the City Airport so picked up a ferry each day from the O2 pier to get us into the City and directly to attractions such as the London Eye, Westminster Abbey, Parliament, Tower of London, Tower Bridge and Greenwich all for a relativly inexpensive fare

    o2 pier Thames clipper Ferry Under Tower Bridge Traitors Gate tower of London Passing HMS Belfast tourist attraction
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

London Hotels

See all 2367 Hotels in London

Latest London Hotel Reviews

Waverley House Hotel
Excellent (4.5 out of 5.0) 4 Reviews
Comfort Inn Hyde Park
Bad (2.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
Royal National Hotel
Bad (2.0 out of 5.0) 31 Reviews
Radisson Edwardian Mountbatten Hotel
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 4 Reviews
The W14 Kensington
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 6 Reviews
Holiday Inn Garden Court London - Oxford Circus
Very Good (3.5 out of 5.0) 2 Reviews
DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel London - Marble Arch
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
St Giles London - St Giles Classic Hotel
Good (3.0 out of 5.0) 11 Reviews
DoubleTree by Hilton - London Hyde Park
Excellent (4.5 out of 5.0) 5 Reviews
Best Western Cumberland Hotel Harrow
Terrible (1.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
Marriott London County Hall
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 7 Reviews
Montana Hotel
Good (3.0 out of 5.0) 4 Reviews

Instant Answers: London

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

30 travelers online now

Comments (5)

  • toonsarah's Profile Photo
    Nov 16, 2014 at 2:46 AM

    Transport for London has announced its fares for 2015. Traditionally prices rise every January, but this year there is some good news. If you are using an Oyster or the new contactless system the daily price cap is actually coming down! In zones 1-2, where most visitors spend most of their time, the daily cap will reduce from £8.40 to £6.40, meaning that you would never spend more than that in a day, no matter how many tubes and buses you catch. I haven't yet done the maths but I think this will make Oyster by far the best option for most visitors. See here for more info, including caps for other zones: londonist.com/2014/11/2015-t...

    • angiebabe's Profile Photo
      Nov 16, 2014 at 5:06 PM

      good idea to get a guidebook such as the Lonely Planet for Europe which is an excellent resource to have for the long term

    • LakshyaR's Profile Photo
      Nov 16, 2014 at 8:35 PM

      i apperiate ur advise

  • toonsarah's Profile Photo
    Aug 17, 2014 at 2:28 AM

    Transport for London is planning to move to a new payment system. Oyster will be phased out and you will be bale to use contactless debit cards instead, though I think there will be a period of overlap when both can be used (as at present on the buses). The Londonist has produced a useful article on how this is expected to work: londonist.com/2014/08/contac...

    But I'm not at all clear yet what the position will be for visitors from abroad who maybe don't have a contactless debit card. I'll keep monitoring the situation and post again if I find out.

    • angiebabe's Profile Photo
      Jun 27, 2015 at 2:31 AM

      are they still phasing out the Oyster card? i forgot you wrote this and been using mine since ive been back - was good to see the prices have come down a bit!

    • toonsarah's Profile Photo
      Jun 28, 2015 at 2:43 AM

      I haven't heard any more about it being phased out but they certainly seem to be encouraging the use of debit cards instead

  • HackneyBird's Profile Photo
    Apr 27, 2014 at 1:00 AM

    As from 6th July 2014 there will be NO cash fares accepted on London buses. For more information go to www.tfl.gov.uk/

    • RavensWing's Profile Photo
      Apr 27, 2014 at 4:29 AM

      Well I only plan to fly into LHR and then find the way to where ever Stonehenge is and head there right away. I might not even need one for him.

    • leics's Profile Photo
      Apr 27, 2014 at 5:45 AM

      You can just use the Tube from LHR if you need to get into London, or the National Express buses. Stonehenge is near Salisbury so you'll need to take the train from London Waterloo www.nationalrail.co.uk or the bus from either Heathrow or Victoria coach station. www.nationalexpress.com Then you'll need bus or taxi from Salisbury to the stones themselves. The ordinary bus service which used to exist has now turned into a hoho, unfortunately: http://www.thestonehengetour.info/

  • planxty's Profile Photo
    Apr 19, 2014 at 7:22 AM

    Temporary notice 19th April, 2014.

    The RMT Union has just announced that they are to hold another two of their strikes from 2100 hours on Monday 28th April for 48 hours and from 2100 hours on Monday 5th May for 72 hours. As always, these are designed to cause maximum disruption by being during the working week and will affect both Londoners and visitors alike. There will be a huge strain on other forms of public transport so travellers are advised to plan well ahead if they are visiting during these periods.

    I shall attempt to keep this information as current as possible should there be any changes.

    planxty (fergy).

  • planxty's Profile Photo
    Dec 17, 2012 at 12:07 PM

    I have just heard on the BBC News in London that Tube (Underground / Metro) workers are going on strike for 24 hours on Boxing Day (26th December, 2012). Members of the ASLEF Union have today voted in favour of this action which will seriously disrupt transportation in London on this public holiday. They have also voted for industrial action on the 18th January, 2013 and 25th January, 2013. Here is a link.

    bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-20...

    I shall update this if there is any change in the situation.

London Transportation

planxty's Profile Photo

Update January 2015

 

 

In their continuing drive to force passengers to purchase travel or Oyster cards thereby maximising their profits,...

Map of London

London Members Meetings

Sep 18, 2015 
Pre Treasure Hunt drinks and dinner
Sep 18, 2015 
DINNER
Sep 19, 2015 
Annual VT Treasure Hunt
Sep 20, 2015 
Open House Day (Part of Treasure Hunt meet)

see all London member meetings