Public Buses, London

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  • New Version of London Cab
    New Version of London Cab
    by walterwu
  • traffic jam
    traffic jam
    by didier06
  • Long Limousine beside Doubel Deck Bus
    Long Limousine beside Doubel Deck Bus
    by walterwu
  • halikowski's Profile Photo

    Hybrid buses

    by halikowski Written Apr 14, 2014

    Saw these for the first time in March 2014. They run on electric batteries, but when they get to a certain speed, the diesel motor cuts in. Innovative, clever way to keep living in huge cities at a pollution minimum.

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  • sourbugger's Profile Photo

    Still possible to ride on a proper big red bus.

    by sourbugger Updated Apr 7, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The bad news is : The design Icon of the 1950's, the routemaster bus has been withdrawn from normal service.

    The Good news is : at least for the present, ten of the buses have been saved to run on the central London section of routes 9 & 15. The further good news is that they are intergrated into the network with normal fares and travelcards being accepted.

    Heritage Routemasters will run every 15 minutes, every day between about 09:30 and 18:30 on the following routes:

    Route 9
    Royal Albert Hall
    Knightsbridge
    Piccadilly Circus
    Trafalgar Square
    Charing Cross
    Strand
    Aldwych

    UPDATE 2014 : This route is now under threat, stand clear of the last doors please !

    Route 15
    Trafalgar Square
    Charing Cross
    Strand
    Fleet Street
    St Paul?s Cathedral
    Monument
    Tower Hill

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  • HackneyBird's Profile Photo

    The Wheels On The Bus . . .

    by HackneyBird Updated Mar 20, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You will probably recognise the iconic red London buses. But do you know why London Buses are red?

    Route numbers were introduced across London in 1907, and competition for passengers was fierce among the capital's numerous small bus companies. As private firms, they were allowed to paint their buses any colour they chose, and the largest of them, the London General Omnibus Company, wanted to make their buses stand our from those of their rivals, so they adopted bright red paint and a new logo. The new logo, LGOG, was a spoked wheel design, that eventually evolved into the world-famous London Transport and later Transport for London logo.

    By the time the on-going process of consolidation and rationalisation had led to the creation of the London Transport organisation in 1933, the predominant colour for London buses was red and has been ever since.

    There are 8,500 London buses in service today, covering around 700 routes and calling at more than 19,500 bus stops on the way. With more than two billion passenger journeys made every year, it is estimated that 90% of Londoners live within 400 yards of a bus stop.

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  • Orkaena's Profile Photo

    SPIRIT OF LONDON STREETS

    by Orkaena Updated Jun 14, 2013
    Iconic
    4 more images

    If suddenly you must think about an iconic image of the streets of London, which would be this image? The famous red buses for sure, someone can imagine this city without this venerable machine?
    There are two ways to ride on, the proper public transport (efficient net, I should say), and the city tour to know a bit more of the metropolis without any effort (several different circuits to choose), and in both ways it is an enjoyable experience.

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  • Britannia2's Profile Photo

    London buses

    by Britannia2 Updated Apr 19, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Buses stop near Waterloo
    3 more images

    I never use the buses where I live but I actually like using the buses in London. With a little advance planning it is very easy to get around London - the buses have a public address system and a recorded voice constantly updates the journey. Price for a single journey is £2.25 but the best value is a day ticket ( see the website for details). If you have a day ticket and you get on the wrong bus it does not really matter as you can get off and just get on another bus.
    The buses are generally clean and safe even at night in central London (perhaps not some suburbs) but the drivers are not helpful - ask another passenger if you need travel help. They are certainly slow due to the heavy traffic but if you are not in a rush it does not really matter and the view from upstairs is certainly worth the price of the ticket. Buses seem to run every few minutes in the central area and bus maps are free from travel centres.
    Recommnded.

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Traveling by bus in London

    by Dabs Updated Feb 24, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Double decker bus

    I'm a fan of using the subway when I visit foreign cities, it always seems more straightforward than using buses, especially in a place you are not familiar in. Now that I'm more familiar with London, I enjoy riding the bus. The London bus stops are very well marked with the routes, pointing out which tube stations that route passes as well as major landmarks. If you are from a country that drives on the right side of the road, remember to stand on the opposite side of the road than you are used to!

    The main advantage to using the bus in London is that you obviously get to see more above ground than you do below ground. The best spot is upstairs on the double decker buses in the front seat if you can get it.

    Check out the excellent London toolkit website that maps out routes for the key attractions in London and also the TFL Visitor Guide, especially the map for key bus routes in Central London. Much cheaper than taking the pricey Big Bus Tour

    Another advantage to using the bus is that it is cheaper, for example a 7 day bus pass that covers ALL of London as of 1/1/13 is only £19.60, a 7 day zone 1-2 (central London) tube/DLR pass as of 1/1/13 is £30.40 (although it also covers bus travel in all of London in addition to the tube and DLR). Single fares are £2.40 (£1.40 with an Oyster), tube fares are higher and depend on the zone.

    The downside? It's likely to take longer on the bus than the tube and during rush hour you will almost always have to stand but that's also true of the tube. And I wouldn't even attempt to take luggage on the bus if it was rush hour!

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  • davidjo's Profile Photo

    easy and well signposted

    by davidjo Written Nov 29, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    bus stop
    2 more images

    Throughout the capital you will always be near a bus stop, usually with a small shelter with seats available while you wait for your bus. There will normally be a timetable of the buses that pass by the stop and also a list of areas which will inform you of which bus would be suitable for your journey, and there will also be a post displaying the bus numbers that stop there.

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    RIDE THE BIG RED BUS

    by balhannah Written Sep 10, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    London Buses

    Travelling from our Hotel into London city, we mainly caught the Tube, which is quite ok, except that it's underground.
    One day, we decided to go into the city on the double decker Red Bus. We sat up the top, and saw heaps from the top level. I was glad we did this as we got to see the sights in our area, what the areas were like on the outskirts of London, and just how busy the roads were.

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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    London Buses

    by spidermiss Updated May 20, 2012
    Buses on Oxford Street

    To update soon

    Buses run generally from 5.00am to 12.30am and some routes (including the No. 10) operate 24 hours. Please note cash is not accept on bus journeys in Zone 1 and will either have to obtain a travel ticket or Oyster card before getting on a bus.

    Heritage Routes: Perfect for sightseeing: Nos. 9 , 10 and 15.

    10 Sightseeing - Kings Cross, Oxford Street, Marble Arch, Park Lane, Royal Albert Hall, Kensington Palace, Kensington High Street and Hammersmith (To update soon)

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  • didier06's Profile Photo

    Double decker bus

    by didier06 Written Jan 4, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    the routemaster
    1 more image

    During our stay, we frequently used the double decker bus, one symbol of London.
    Of course with the traffic, traveling by bus is slower, but offers an irreplaceable view of London.

    The icon routemaster still in use on lines 9 and 15 provides a retro charm

    A guide of central London bus is available at the information center in major metro stations.

    Price: cash single $ 2.30
    with oyster card $ 1.35

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  • meteorologist1's Profile Photo

    A cheap and fun way to tour London

    by meteorologist1 Written Nov 27, 2011
    Tour London on Bus #11

    Take advantage of public transportation, namely the famous red double-decker buses. This is absolutely a cheap and fun way to tour London! Use an Oyster card and it costs only 1.30 pounds per ride (as of October 2011). The buses are very frequent, so you rarely have to wait for a long time. I recommend taking Buses #11 and #15 (find route information and timetables on web site below). On the upper deck. try to grab the front-row seat and you will have a great ride!

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  • Britannia2's Profile Photo

    A city tour by ordinary buses

    by Britannia2 Written Nov 20, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A London bus

    Here is a suggested route on how to see most of Londons famous sites using ordinary buses - sit upstairs and enjoy the views at a fraction of the price a tourist bus would charge. It starts and ends at Trafalgar Square.
    15 Trafalgar Square to Tower Gateway (you will see The Strand, Royal Courts,Fleet Street, St Pauls and the Tower of London)
    RV1 to Waterloo (you will see Tower Bridge , Tate Modern, National Theatre and the London Eye)
    139 to Baker Street (you will see Picadilly Circus, Regent St, Oxford St and Marble Arch)
    74 to Park Lane (you will see Hyde Park)
    73 to Victoria (you will see Wellington Arch and on the left the back of Buckingham Palace)
    11 to Trafalgar Square (you will see Westminster Cathedral, New Scotland Yard, Westminster Abbey, Houses of Parliament, Horse Guards and Admiralty Arch)
    If you need further advice look at the website for where various bus stops are.

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  • walterwu's Profile Photo

    Narrow Roads

    by walterwu Written Sep 1, 2011

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    Double Deck Bus Operated by Metroline
    2 more images

    London is an old city which was built long ago. The roads in most places are narrow and moving around in buses can be very time consuming because of the limited road.

    In the main city of London, the roads are wider and more buses are available. When I took a bus from Baker Street, the buses waiting for each other to clear the bus stops seems to be the one holding up what would otherwise have been a pleasant ride.

    But on the whole, the bus rides are better, in terms of views, as compared to taking the underground tube. With our Traveller's day pass, we were able to decide and change our route based on sights and scenery on-the-go taking into consideration traffic condition.

    However, I do have to state that our bus rides where on weekends and quite alot of time the buses were held up at bus stops waiting for the buses ahead to move on. Not too sure how the situation would be like on weekdays.

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  • codrutz's Profile Photo

    Red Buses

    by codrutz Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    The red buses are famous and a landmark of London. They are almost all double decker (two floors for passengers). Old buses (second picture), with the small open deck at the back, are still operating on some routes.

    Though London streets are crowded and the tube is perhaps more efficient, taking a red bus is a nice way to travel around for short distances. For longer distances use the tube.

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  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Bus - Great way to see London

    by karenincalifornia Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Double decker bus near Trafalgar Square

    It's tempting to rely exclusively on the Tube because it's so easy to get all around London that way. Try the bus as alternative occasionally, because there is so much more to see of London above ground than below. Your Oyster card will work on the bus, and the bus system is very extensive. See link for map below.

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