Oldham Local Customs

  • roll us yer cap
    roll us yer cap
    by carlrea

Most Recent Local Customs in Oldham

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    Black Pudding

    by Balam Updated Dec 7, 2009

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    Black Pudding is and has always been popular around Lancashire. I love it with a Hot Mustard.
    Black pudding has an interesting history with many people thinking that it is just a Lancashire thing but it isn't. Black pudding as it is made in Lancashire is a blend of onions, pork fat, Pigs Blood, oatmeal and flavourings. while looking up info for this i found Sources that indicate the sausage (as that is what it is really) has its origins in ancient Greece with Homer's Odyssey making a reference to the 'roasting of a stomach stuffed with blood and fat'.

    Today black Pudding (or Black sausage) is a staple of many menus across Europe and comes in many different guises like the Spanish morcilla which makes an excellent tapas, Blutwurst is a German type while the Budin Noir is a delicacy in France. This old medieval dish has quite a fanatical following and the humble black pudding has a festival dedicated to it in northern England. In Ramsbottom Just outside Bury (Greater Manchester) There is a World Black Pudding Throwing Championship. The black puddings are put into womans tights and thrown at a large stack of Black puddings, The winner is whoever knocks the most off.

    In France so many puddings are consumed in a black pudding fair that is held in Normandy every year that if you were to lay them end to end they would stretch about 5 km,
    The Andalucia region of southern Spain hold pig-killing fiestas every November to celebrate the collection of the winter suply of morcilla's, hams and sausages.

    Some of the best Black Puddings are made in Bury just outside Manchester in the North of England were they are a great feature on the Famous Market.

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    Oldham Carnival

    by Evenith666 Written May 16, 2009

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    Although Oldham has a long tradition of Carnivals, the current Annual Oldham Carnival started life around 1900 to create "welcomed respite from the tedium of everyday life". The carnival is held mid-to-late summer and aims to raise money for various charities. It often featured people of local importance, brass, jazz and military bands, a Carnival Queen, people in fancy dress, dancers and decorated floats. Local entertainers and celebrities were also asked to join.

    The carnivals route began in the town centre, wound its way along King Street and ended with a party in Alexandra Park. The carnival fell out of favour and popularity in the late 1990's, but however was ressurected in 2006 and rebranded the Peoples Carnival.

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    Meat and Potatoe Pie

    by Balam Written Dec 17, 2007

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    1lb shin beef, cut into small pieces shortcrust pastry
    1 large onion, cut up salt and pepper
    2lb potatoes

    Instructions
    Simmer the beef, onion and seasoning in water for 1 and a half hours until tender. Strain, reserving the stock. Boil the potatoes, cut into chunks, add to the meat. Put into a pie dish, add a little stock, then cover with fairly thick shortcrust pastry and bake in a hot oven for 40 minutes. Use the remaining meat stock to make a gravy.

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    Mushy Peas

    by Balam Written Dec 17, 2007

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    Often virulently green, undeniably squishy, a favourite accompaniment to your fish and chips: what exactly are mushy peas? And as peas, what relation do they bear to the non-mushy kind?

    Well, the peas that become mushy begin life as dried marrowfat peas. Marrowfat peas are mature peas that have been allowed to dry out naturally in the field, rather than be harvested in their prime of youth like the garden pea. Their unusual name comes from the Japanese who introduced the maro pea 100 years ago, encouraging us to grow nice fat maros in the suitable English climate.

    The dried marrowfat peas are soaked overnight in water and bicarbonate of soda. The bicarbonate breaks the peas down to give them that all-important mushiness. Next, they are boiled and then simmered for varying lengths of time. Some people recommend one to two hours, others a brisk 20 minutes. The trick to really good mushy peas. please note, is to leave the seasoning to the very end and then add a knob of butter. Enjoy!

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    Hot Pot

    by Balam Written Dec 17, 2007

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    Ingredients
    900g/2lb best end and middle neck British lamb, sliced into chops
    1 tbsp groundnut oil
    butter
    4 lamb's kidneys, skinned, cored and cut into bite-sized pieces
    3 onions, sliced into 1cm/½in wedges
    1 tbsp plain flour
    570ml/20fl oz freshly boiled water
    ½ tsp Worcestershire sauce
    1 fresh bay leaf
    2 thyme sprigs
    900g/2lb potatoes, cut into 2cm slices
    sea salt
    freshly ground black pepper

    Method
    1. Pre-heat the oven to 170C/325F/Gas 3.
    2. Trim the lamb of any excess fat and pat dry with paper towel.
    3. Heat the oil and a small knob of butter in a large heavy-based frying pan until very hot. Add the lamb, two or three pieces at a time, and fry until brown, turning once. Once browned, put them in a wide 3.5-litre casserole. Brown the pieces of kidney.
    4. Once the meat and kidney are in the casserole, add the onions to the pan. Fry over medium heat, adding a little more butter to the pan if necessary, for about ten minutes until browned at the edges.
    5. Stir in the flour then gradually add the hot water and Worcestershire sauce, stirring until the flour and liquid are smoothly blended. Season with salt and pepper and bring to simmering point. Pour over the meat in the casserole.
    6. Add the bay leaf and thyme, then arrange the potato slices on top in an overlapping pattern. Season the potatoes and dot the surface with a few dabs of butter.
    7. Cover with a tight-fitting lid and put in the oven. Cook for 1 hour 30 minutes. Towards the end of cooking time, remove the lid and brush the potatoes with a little more butter. Then place under the grill to crisp up. Alternatively, remove the lid and increase the heat to 200C/400F/Gas 6 for the last 15 minutes of cooking.
    8. Remove the bay leaf and thyme before serving.

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    Some Oldham sayings!

    by carlrea Written Jan 18, 2005

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    roll us yer cap

    Some things you might hear people say in Oldham.

    1. Oh aye not so bad now. - i am doing rather o.k.
    2. 'av gone fer buzz - i have gone to catch the bus.
    3. Hows 'tha doin' - how are you doing?
    4. are y'on yer jack -are you on your own?
    5. A 'wer p****d as a***holes - i was extremely drunk.

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