Hereford Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Balam
  • Things to Do
    by Balam
  • Things to Do
    by Balam

Most Recent Things to Do in Hereford

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    All Saints

    by leics Updated Sep 29, 2013

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    Church doorway
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    Quite apart from having an entirely excellent cafe inside, this church is interesting in itself.

    The original All Saints church (1200) may have been destroyed in an earthquake (yes, we do have them in the UK!), so the present building is its rebuilding (1330).

    Until recent restoration in the 1990s the large spire was leaning and, in later years, had also acquired a twist. Restorations have removed both, sadly, although I assume this was essential for safety purposes.

    There are some beautifully carved Medieval (I think) choir stalls, with lovely misericords (the bits under the seat on which monks could rest their bottoms when standing during long services). See the photos.

    Some Medieval tiles have been mounted in the wall: I imagine these were discovered during renovation and restoration, along with the Medieval wall painting above the altar.

    It's worth exploring All Saints even if you do not eat in the cafe.....although, with its superb food, variety of beverages and pleasant service it is extremely tempting (I recommend the chocolate brownies!).

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    Edward Elgar

    by leics Updated Sep 29, 2013

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    Sir Edward Elgar ponders.........
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    Sir Edward Elgar is a famous English composer, perhaps best known for his 'Enigma Variations' and his 'Pomp and Circumstance' march.

    He was born in 1857 in a small village in nearby Worcestershire, and throughout his life found inspiration for his music in the landscape around him. He and his family ived in Hereford from 1904 to 1911. He died in 1934.

    There is a lovely sculpture of Elgar (and his bike) gazing up at the cathedral. You might also see his moustachioed face on the back of our 20GBP notes.

    Elgar biography

    If you have never heard any of Elgar's music he is worth seeking out: the music is the quintessence of Englishness.

    'The trees are singing my music........or am I singing theirs?'

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    Visit the cathedral.

    by leics Updated Sep 29, 2013

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    Hereford Cathedral
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    Hereford's cathedral not as massive or as imposing as many English Medieval cathedrals, but it is just as ancient and contains many things of interest.

    When you look at it, remember that it was built (largely in the 12th - 13th centuries) by men who had no power tools, no metal scaffolding (they used wood) and no computers....they just used their incredible skill to create these magnificent buildings, to the glory of God.

    This is the cathedral church of St Mary the Virgin and St Ethelbert the King. It holds the shrines of two saints: St Ethelbert, already mentioned, who was king of England in the 8th centrury, and St Thomas of Hereford, Bishop in the 13th century. St Thomas' shrine was destroyed in 1538, but it was later re-created. Recently it has been restored to how it might have appeared when it was first built (see photo).

    Hereford also has a unique 'chained library' with manuscripts dating back to the 8th century, and a stunning 'Mappa Mundi' (map of the world..'here be dragons'!) from the13th century.

    It's a lovely cathedral, and one well worth exploring. There is no charge, although donations are requested. You'll need to buy a permit to take photographs from the gift shop.

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    See the Mappa Mundi and Chained Library

    by slothtraveller Written Apr 24, 2012

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    Close-up of my Mappa Mundi bookmark!

    While visiting Hereford Cathedral, one thing you must do is go and see the Mappa Mundi. The map, dating from around 1300, is a stunning depiction of the world as it was seen both geographically and spiritually.
    The map is drawn on calf skin and is extremely fragile. Quite rightly, it is supervised at all times and kept in a dark room with just enough light to make out its features. Don't do as a man did when I was visiting and get out a torch for a closer inspection. This was not taken very well by the guard!
    I loved looking at the map as it shows not only place names, but also pictures of strange creatures that don't look like anything that is around today!
    Also included in the entrance fee is entry to the Cathedral's Chained Library. In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, chaining books was a security measure and Hereford's library is the largest of its kind that has survived. From the list of books on each bookcase, I noticed that most of the books in Hereford's Chained Library appeared to be German in origin.
    Between April and October, the Mappa Mundi and Chained Library can be visited between 10am-5pm everyday except Sunday.
    Entrance fee is £6, but I didn't mind paying for a glimpse of this piece of British heritage!

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    Mappa Mundi

    by Balam Updated Dec 13, 2011

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    Mappa Mundi
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    The Mappa Mundi is a 13th century map of the world drawn on a sheet of vellum 64 x 54 inches and supported by an oak frame. The actual map is contained in a circle 52 inches in diameter, mostly written and drawn in black ink with red and gold leaf used for emphasis with rivers and seas in blue or green apart from the Red Sea which is depicted in red.
    Mountain ranges indicated by scalloped designs and towns by walls and towers.
    It depicts many strange monsters and fanciful beasts.

    Although the map is undated it bears the name of Richard de Haldingham e de Lafford and a date of 1290 AD is said to be reliable.

    The Map is housed in Hereford Cathedral just outside the Fantastic Chained Library and an entrance fee of £6 per adult is charged to view the map and library, Well worth it to see this fantastic piece of history

    Mappa Mundi & Chained Library:

    Open Monday - Saturday: 10am - 4pm (last admission 3.30pm) Closed Sundays

    £6.00 Adult

    £5.00 Concession

    £14.00 Family (2 adults and up to three children)

    £10.00 Small Family (1 adult and up to three children)

    Children under 5 free

    £15.00 Annual Season Ticket

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    Hereford Cathedral

    by Balam Written Dec 13, 2011

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    There has been a place of worship on the site of the cathedral since at least the 8th Century but the oldest part of any building surviving today is from the 11th Century Bishops Chapel.

    The Norman Cathedral (most of which survives today) was constructed between 1107 - 1158
    There is no entry fee for the cathedral just a collection box with a sugested donation of £5 although if you wish to see the Mappa Mundi and the chained library you have to pay an entrance fee.
    There is a nice coffee shop situated in the lovely 15th century Bishop's Cloister, the Cloister Café offers a wide range of hot, cold drinks and snacks.

    It is well worth a visit.

    The cathedral is open daily from 9.15 am until Evensong.
    Entrance is free but there is a suggested donation of £5

    Mappa Mundi & Chained Library:
    Open Monday - Saturday: 10am - 4pm (last admission 3.30pm) Closed Sundays

    £6.00 Adult

    £5.00 Concession

    £14.00 Family (2 adults and up to three children)

    £10.00 Small Family (1 adult and up to three children)

    Children under 5 free

    £15.00 Annual Season Ticket

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    Hereford Cathedral

    by slothtraveller Updated Apr 20, 2011

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    Inside Hereford Cathedral

    The current Romaneque cathedral that stands today was built back in 1158. On visiting the cathedral, I noticed that a lot of restoration work was being conducted on the external structure so I hurried along inside to take a look around.
    The cathedral interior is very atmospheric and also very visitor-friendly. Each section of the cathedral has a small placard with info about the nave, the font etc. There is a small gift shop adjoining the main building that sells souvenirs and also a small cafe where you can buy refreshments to enjoy inside or out in the courtyard.
    There is no entry fee to the cathedral although you can donate if you feel like it. You can also take photographs inside.

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    Hereford Library and Museum

    by slothtraveller Written Apr 20, 2011

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    Hereford Museum

    Housed in the Victorian library building with an adjoining art gallery, Hereford's small museum on the first floor of the building illustrates how the city and county of Herefordshire have changed through various historical eras. There are many of artifacts to view including costume, coinage and even stuffed animal exhibits. Admission is free.

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    Bridge over the River Wye

    by Myfanwe Written Mar 28, 2010

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    Hereford Bridge
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    This great old road bridge was built in 1490, and had a gate that was demolished in 1782. The bridge was widened in 1826. There is a lovely path running alongside the river from end furthest away from town. From here you can get some great views of the Bridge and Cathedral.

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    The Chained Library

    by Myfanwe Updated Mar 28, 2010

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    The Chained library

    The Hereford Chained Library is the most perfect known example of an early Jacobean library. Its original fittings include hasps, battle-axe lock plates, and handmade nails, rods, sockets, desks, seats and index boards. The books are arranged on three tiers of shelves in oak bookcases, the most famous of which date from 1611.

    This collection of about 1,444 books, each with a chain attached to the front edge of one cover, is the largest such collection in the world. The chains end in a ring which runs upon a rod, and when a book is added to the shelf a key is used to free the hasp and release the rod. The earliest chains have swivels to prevent twisting when the book is in use.

    Some volumes are printed and some are manuscripts, the earliest of which dates from 7th century. One of the 8th century volumes has Saxon records at the end which prove it has belonged to Hereford since the days of King Canute, whose name appears in these records. One of the 15th century volumes is the famous Cider Bible, a 1420 copy of Wycliffe’s version in English.

    Most manuscripts are on vellum or parchment (sheepskin). Skins were polished with pumice, whitened with chalk, dressed with oil and cut into sheets. Writing fluid consisted of soot, gum, liquid from cuttlefish and lampblack which will never fade. Writing was executed using swan, goose or crow quills, which do not corrode. The ingredients to which pigments were added for illuminations were glue, gum and gelatine diluted with white of egg.

    The Chained Library contains about 55 books which were printed before 1500, two of these by Caxton.

    There is an entrance fee to see the chained library together with the Mappa Mundi.

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    Mappa Mundi

    by Myfanwe Written Mar 28, 2010

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    A copy of the Mappa mundi
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    The Mappa Mundi is a unique map of the World dating back from the 13th Century. It's the only complete wall map of Earth to have survived from the Middle Ages. The Map and exhibition are on display in Hereford Cathedral. Here you can also see a display of Ancient chests, excellent information boards about the history of the map and the famous chained library.

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    Visit the Cathedral

    by Myfanwe Written Oct 31, 2009

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    1 more image

    Hereford Cathedral is one of the biggest Cathedrals I have seen. This beautiful building is Grade I listed and dates back from 1079 and has an extensive history behind it. Its most famous treasure is Mappa Mundi, a mediæval map of the world dating from the 13th century.

    I didn't have time to look inside the Cathedral on my last visit to Hereford but an extensive viewing of the interior is definitely on the cards for my next visit.

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    The Old House

    by Myfanwe Written Oct 31, 2009

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    The Old House
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    The Old House is situated right in the Centre of Hereford amidst the modern shopping precinct of the City. It is a lovely, well preserved 17th Century timber framed house and serve as a reminder of times gone by.

    It was built in 1621 and was the home to a local butcher and was formerly in the hands of Lloyds Bank up until 1929 when it became a museum giving an insight into daily life in Jacobean times. It is furnished in period style with an internationally important collection of English Oak furniture with interesting pieces in every room. Of particular interest to many visitors are the rare wall-paintings, the four-poster bed and the baby-walkers.

    Opening Times All year: Tuesday to Saturday 10am–5pm.

    Plus April-Sept: Sunday and Bank Holiday Mondays 10am-4pm.

    Closed on Mondays, Good Friday, Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Years Day.

    Best of all... Admission is free but there is a donation box near the door and also a little gift shop selling memorabilia.

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  • How Haunted is Herefordshire?

    by herefordpd Written Jul 19, 2009
    A real interactive way to explore the county

    HOW HAUNTED IS THE COUNTY?

    The county has certainly been placed on the “paranormal” map since the Hereford Paranormal Group began investigating sightings and reports back in 2006. It is hardly surprising that a county that is steeped with so much history has reports of those from the past apparently attempting to re-visit.

    With well over 50 sites, which is growing, reporting ghostly apparitions, myths and other spooky goings on, a new website was launched for the people interested in just how haunted the Herefordshire is in a very interactive way. The “Hereford Paranormal Database, is an excellent way to learn about the history of Herefordshire and its unexplainable paranormal accounts whether you are living in the county or visiting.

    The Hereford Paranormal Database would also love to hear from you if you feel there should be an account included on the website.

    This truly is the definitive guide to the reports of paranormal activity in the Hereford city and the surrounding County. You may be surprised to learn just how Haunted Herefordshire supposedly is!!

    Excellent site for those with an interest planning a visit.

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    Haunted Hereford website

    by nicosia23 Written Sep 28, 2008

    Heard about this website on Wyvern Fm a few weeks ago,I thought I would take a look at it and I have't to admit the website is brilliant for visitors to Hereford,it has all of Hereford's hauntings on it and historic buildings, history, D.I.Y ghost walk etc,its a real good, informative website!

    www.haunted-hereford.co.uk

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