Clock Tower, St Albans

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  • The Clock Tower
    The Clock Tower
    by vichatherly
  • The Clock Tower
    The Clock Tower
    by vichatherly
  • The Clock Tower
    The Clock Tower
    by vichatherly
  • Britannia2's Profile Photo

    The Clock Tower

    by Britannia2 Written May 7, 2011
    The Clock Tower

    The tower was built between 1403 and 1412 and is the only medieval town belfry in England still in existence. It was built by the townsmen to assert their freedom, power and wealth in face of the Cathedral.
    The Towers original bell weighs one ton and has a diameter of one metre is called Gabriel.
    The Tower is 19.6m (64’) high at the parapet. A flight of 93 narrow steps connects the ground floor through the two upper floors to the roof, from where there are fine views of the Abbey, the Roman town of Verulamium, and the historic city of St Albans.
    The present clock dates from 1866, and uses a mechanism invented by Lord Grimthorpe – restorer of the Abbey and designer of the mechanism of the clock for Big Ben at Westminster.
    Open Saturdays, Sundays and Bank Holidays, 10.30-5.0 pm Easter to mid September. 80p for adults and 40p for children.
    There are 93 narrow steps to the viewing platform.

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    • Architecture

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Views from Clock Tower

    by barryg23 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    St Albans
    3 more images

    It costs only 50p to climb the Clock Tower which is great value given the nice views you get from the top. There are 93 steps and it's an extremely narrow stairway. If you meet anyone going in the opposite direction, one of you will have to backtrack. There are a small number of exhibits on the ground floor, a few more on another floor about halfway up, as well as a small room showing the tower's famous bell, which has survived over 600 years.

    From the top there are good views of St Albans, especially of the Cathedral to the south. You get a good idea of the geography of the city and a birds eye view of the market and the surrounding streets.

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  • planxty's Profile Photo

    There aren't many of them!

    by planxty Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    St. Albans Clock Tower, Hertfordshire.
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    The picture shows the St. Albans Clock Tower is one of only two curfew towers left in England (the other being Morpeth in Northumberland). As the name suggests, it was used to advise the citizens of the evening curfew. It is only open on weekends from Easter to September, so I didn't get to go inside, although it is worth visiting just to admire the architecture. The tower was built between 1403 and 1412.

    The two subsidiary photographs are of two plaques on the wall describing the history of the tower and the fact that Queen Eleanor's body rested on the site in 1290 on the way to her funeral in London.

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  • Wowmoment's Profile Photo

    Climb the Clock Tower

    by Wowmoment Updated May 9, 2008

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    St Albans Clock Tower

    The Clock Tower in St Albans is situated in the centre of town between the main shopping street and the Abbey.

    It is situated on the site of an Eleanor Cross. Queen Eleanor was the wife of King Edward I and in 1290 her funeral procession rested in various places on its progression to Westminster, the site of these resting places was marked by a cross and many are still visible today.

    The Clock Tower itself was erected in 1403. It is possible to climb to the top and enjoy exceptional views of the town and countryside.

    The tower is open Saturdays, Sundays and Bank Holidays.

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Clock Tower

    by barryg23 Updated Dec 3, 2006

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    Clock Tower
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    The Clock Tower is one of the symbols of St. Albans. Built in the 15th century, on a design based on the clock tower at Westminster in London (no longer standing), it is the only remaining medieval town belfry in England.

    St. Albans played a big part in the 14th century Peasants Revolt (in which a group of rebels stormed the tower of London) and one of the reasons why so many from St. Albans joined in was the impatience of the townspeople with the local Abott.

    The tower was commissioned at the start of the 15th century by the people of St. Albans , who wished to assert their independence from the church. It lies right in the centre of town where High Street meets the Market Place.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Views from the Clock Tower

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 28, 2006

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    Looking north over the market & Corn exchange
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    Its a very tight squeeze up the 93 narrow steps to the top of the Clock Tower but the views from the open-air top over the city and surrounding countryside are well worth the effort. The best view is of the cathedral which is hardly obstructed and you also get a good view of the market winding its way northwards towards St Peters church.

    Open: 10.30am-5pm Sat, Sun & Bank Holidays from Easter to October. Admission: 50p.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Clock Tower

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 28, 2006

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    The Clock Tower, in the very heart of the city centre, is the only surviving medieval clock tower in England. It was built between 1403 and 1412 by architect Thomas Wolvey and is based on the great Clock House at Westminster Palace, London which was built by Wolvey's master Henry Yevele in 1365 near where Big Ben stands today. The tower is 19.6m (64ft) high and the walls are up to 4ft (1.22m) thich to withstand the ringing of the bell. The bell is still the original bell, named for the Archangel Gabriel, and was cast at Aldgate in London by William and Robert Burford and is 1.2m (46ins) in diameter and weighs 1 ton. You can still see the bell on one of the 5 floors as you climb up the 93 near impossibly twisty tight stairs that take you up to the top where the views over the city and surrounding countryside are well worth the effort. There's a smaller bell beside the original, dated 1729, which was moved here from the old Market House nearby. The 2 lower levels display drawing and photos of the clock tower over the centuries as well as other scenes from the city's past.

    Open: 10.30am-5pm Sat, Sun & Bank Holidays from Easter to October. Admission: 50p

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  • Mique's Profile Photo

    The clock tower

    by Mique Updated Jul 18, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The clock tower

    The clock tower was build in the beginning of the 15th century. The bell it contains dates back to 1335. It is one of the 2 remaining medieval curfew towers in the UK.

    In the summer you can visit the tower during weekends. And of course i was there in april and in the midst of the week.... Just my luck

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