Welwyn Things to Do

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  • Things to Do
    by Willettsworld
  • Things to Do
    by Willettsworld

Most Recent Things to Do in Welwyn

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    Rose Cottage

    by Willettsworld Updated Jun 2, 2009

    Anne Van Gogh, sister of the famous painter Vincent Van Gogh, lived here between 1875-6. Employed as an usher at a school in Ramsgate, Kent at the time, he visited Anne on more than one occasion, poverty compelling him to walk all the way from London.

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    Ivy Cottage

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 2, 2009

    This cottage dates from around 1452 and was formerly 'Miss Applegarth's School'. Anne Van Gogh taught French here in 1875 and 1876. Her brother Vincent Van Gogh walked all the way from Ramsgate in Kent to visit her at Rose Cottage, Church Street where she lived at the time.

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    Church of St Mary the Virgin

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 2, 2009
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    A Norman church was built on this site around 1190. The nave of the present church was built in the 13th century, the chancel arch being the most obvious early structure. There are two medieval corbels at the east end of the south aisle. Patronage of the church passed through several hands until in 1549 it was sold to the Wilshere family, who lived at The Frythe, a country house nearby, until relatively recently.

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    Wellington Inn

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 2, 2009

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    This large inn has a sign saying that it was built in 1352. In the 17th and 18th centuries as a coaching inn it became an important stopping off point for weary travellers heading up the Great North Road; the famous writer Samuel Pepys is said to have stayed here and remarked that "he had had his worst night’s sleep ever!"

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    Roman Baths - Finds

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 2, 2009

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    As well as a skeletal remains of a woman buried on the site, several finds were excavated at the Roman baths. Finds include glassware, pottery, bronze lettering, coins, knife blades, hair pins and broaches which are all displayed in glass cabinets beside the ruins.

    Open: 2-5pm Saturdays. Admission: £1.50

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    Roman Baths

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 2, 2009

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    In 1960, local archaeologist Tony Rook saw Roman tiles in the bank of the River Mimram. He began a training dig and after 10 years of excavation, the Roman baths (located to the east of the village under the A1(M) motorway) were fully uncovered - just as the route was announced for the building of the motorway that would be built straight through the site. The baths are protected 9 metres under the motorway and can be accessed via a tunnel but some other buildings were completely lost.

    The Welwyn Baths are a small part of the Dicket Mead villa, a Roman ruin which was originally built in the 3rd century AD. The complex was probably part of a farm, and may have also formed a country retreat for a wealthy merchant from London or St. Albans. It has also been speculated that it might have been at least in part the equivalent of an hotel, lying as it does near the Roman roads from London to Chester. The baths feature a frigidarium (cold room), tepidarium (warm room), caldarium (hot room) and hypocaust (under floor heating system).

    Open: 2-5pm Saturdays. Admission: £1.50

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    Welwyn Viaduct

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 2, 2009

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    The Welwyn Viaduct isn't strictly in Welwyn but just to the north of Welwyn Garden City and south of a village called Digswell, from which it also goes by the name of Digswell Viaduct. It's a very large local landmark that carries the twin track East Coast Main Line over the River Mimram. The viaduct is around 1,560ft (475m) long and comprises forty arches of 30ft (9.1m) span, and is 100ft (30m) high from ground level to track bed. It is built of brick fired from brick clay quarried on site during construction, and took two years to build.

    It was originally opened by Queen Victoria on 6th August 1850, but she was so frightened of its height that she refused to travel across it. The train carrying her had to stop, upon which she left the train and entered a horse drawn carriage to travel the length of the bridge on the ground. She then re-entered the train at the other end of the viaduct and continued her journey.

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    Old Church House

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 2, 2009
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    A timber framed house built around 1450, close to the Church. Apart from having been a dwelling it has also been an Almshouse, a Post Office, a School and the Village Police Station.

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Welwyn Things to Do

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