Kingston upon Hull Off The Beaten Path

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Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Kingston upon Hull

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    Ottingham and its church

    by Britannia2 Written Jul 19, 2014
    Ottringham church
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    Ottringham is a small village on the Hull to Withernsea road and worth visiting for its 12th century church. This is the only church in Holderness to have enclosed pews and you open a small door at the end of each pew to gain access to a seat.
    St Wilfreds is a beautiful church and its high spire is visible for many miles.
    The village has two pubs and an Indian restaurant and is the start of the long road to Sunk Island and the interesting flatlands of Holderness and the Humber bank.

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    Paull

    by Britannia2 Written Jun 20, 2014
    Paull
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    Paull is a nice riverside village on the banks of the River Humber. There are three pub restaurants here and great views along to both the mouth of the Humber and back to Hull and the Humber Bridge.
    East of Paull along the river bank is a wetland area (near the mechanical lighthouses you can see from the village) and there are many bird species here.

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    Princes Avenue / Newland Avenue

    by Britannia2 Updated Jun 20, 2014

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    Take a number 5 bus from the centre to Princes Avenue - about 10 minutes - this is a trendy area for coffee shops and interesting shops such as ethnic grocers, antique shops, book shops and some good pubs.
    Continue up Princes Avenue and bear left after Pearson Park in to Newland Avenue for more interesting shops, pubs and coffee shops.
    If you are coming to Hull University this area is the hub of student life.
    Hulls best restaurants are on these streets (see my many reviews) - city centre tax is 40% and it only 10% in the suburbs and this is why you can find fine dining on these two Avenues.

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    Spurn Point

    by Britannia2 Updated Apr 15, 2014

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    Spurn Point

    A long peninsula that has the North Sea on one side and the River Humber on the other. Three and a half miles long and only fifty metres wide in places it has a single track road with passing places along it. Spurn is made up of a series of sand and shingle banks held together with mainly Marram grass and Seabuckthorn.
    There are a series of sea defence works built by the Victorians and maintained by the Ministry of Defence, till they sold Spurn to the Yorkshire Wildlife Trust in the 1950s. The defences are in a poor state, breaking down and crumbling. This is making Spurn a very fragile place wide open to the ravages of the North Sea.
    Entrance to the peninsula is £3.00 (as at summer 2010) and the proceeds go to maintain the road and for nature conservancy. A wonderful place for bird watchers and for watching ships enter and leave the Humber to and from the North Sea.
    This has a real end of the world feel to it and I have a dedicated album on my Hull pages.
    PLEASE CHECK WITH ME BEFORE VISITING - THE ROAD COLLAPSED IN THE 2013 FLOODS AND ACCESS MAY ONLY BE FROM KILNSEA ON FOOT.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Birdwatching
    • Beaches

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    Discovering the Old Town

    by Landotravel Updated Jun 12, 2012

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    The Kingston
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    After investments made during the last years to turn up Hull's pride, one of the most visible results may be the refurbishment of the ancient classic Hull streets. Taking Parish Church as a center it's nice walking aroud the narrow streets discovering breweries, pubs, shops, ancient Edwardian houses and so.

    As a curious thing, you'll see fish motifs engraved on the pavement. It's the fish trail, a regard of Hull's fishing heritage, with different fish species showed in many streets, old and new.

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    Amy Johnson's Memorial

    by Landotravel Written Jun 12, 2012

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    Amy Johnson's Memorial

    In the middle of one of the main trading streets I found this small white statue devoted to the Hull-born famous female aviator Amy Johnson. It was a surprise for I didn't know she was born here, and a right tribute to one of the most famous aviatrix ever (close in fame to Amelia Earhart, i.e.)

    In 1930 she was the first woman who flew alone from Britain to Australia (18.000 km). Her plane -a de Havilland Gipsy Moth- can be seen in the Science Museum, at London. Along with other records she beat another one in 1932 flying solo again from London to Cape Town, South Africa.

    During WWII she flied RAF aircrafts through Britain until 1941 when her plane crashed into the Thames estuary in controverted circumstances and she drowned -some say her plane was shot down by mistake-. A sad end for this brave woman.

    The statue is at Prospect St., one of the main Hull streets, ending at Queen Victoria Sq.

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    River trips on old barges

    by Britannia2 Written May 26, 2012

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    Humber keel and sloop at South Ferriby
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    The River Hull and the River Humber used to be full of barges moving between the Humber ports and smaller towns in Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire but today there are only a few.
    Two very old barges - a keel named Comrade and a sloop named Amy Howson - are preserved and are moored at South Ferriby on the south bank of the Humber.
    It has been possible in past years to take trips on these old barges but as I write this in 2012 there are no planned excursions this year but the barges are open to the public occassionally and the barges do sail too and can be viewed on the river. When in full sail they make a splendid sight.
    The website has details.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    Withernsea

    by Britannia2 Written Aug 10, 2010

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    Withernsea

    A small seaside town to the east of Hull - about 18 miles and a regular bus service via Patrington.
    There is a reasonable beach here and it is popular with families - there are amusements, pubs, fish and chips and ice cream parlours. Quite a good weekend market in the summer.
    The lighthouse is open to the public and there is a small museum here dedicated to Withernsea born actress Kay Kendall.

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    Twigmore Woods

    by Britannia2 Written Jun 16, 2010

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    Twigmore Woods

    A short drive from Hull over the Humber Bridge on the A15 / M180 to Scunthorpe and then on the Kirton Lindsey road (B1398) takes you to Twigmore Woods. This is a large wood with two lakes and pleasant walks through well maintained paths (suitable in places for wheelchairs) and in the late spring and early summer the largest display of rhododendrons I have ever seen.
    There is a car park but no catering or toilet facilities but Morrisons and McDonalds are close by.

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    Bishop Burton

    by Britannia2 Written Apr 30, 2009

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    Bishop Burton

    Bishop Burton is the first pretty East Yorkshire village you pass through once you have left Hulls urban sprawl on your way from Hull to York. Unfortunately it is dissected by the busy A1079 Hull to York road and there are ponds on each side of the road. Many people miss the prettier pond of the two and the one shown below is on the same side of the road as the pub/restaurant.
    A nice village to wander around with a church high above the village that affords quite good views. The Altisidora (named after a race horse) is a good place to go for a meal or drink - many people use it as a coffee stop on their way to the ferry in Hull if they are early and need to kill time.
    More details on my Beverley pages.

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    Swanland

    by Britannia2 Written Apr 27, 2009

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    Swanland

    A pretty East Yorkshire village about 8 miles west of Hull. There is a pond in its centre where the ducks can be fed and a row of very old cottages that have been turned in to shops. The post office built in the 1700s is worth a visit in itself.
    A 153 bus from Hull takes about 40 minutes and travels through Westella which is Hulls stockbroker belt where you will see elegant mansions and houses.

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    Brantingham

    by Britannia2 Written Apr 26, 2009

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    The pond at Brantingham
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    Brantingham is a pretty typically English village 8 miles west of Hull. There is some interesting Dutch gabled architecture here as well as the pub and shops that are typically English village. There is a pond and the village is highly forested as is the area it sits in. Good as a base for country walks in Brantingham Dale.
    Just off the A63 at Elloughton but infrequent bus service for non drivers (155 from Hull).

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    Spurn Point

    by JohnnySpangles Updated Sep 5, 2008

    Spurn Point is about 40 miles from Hull and well worth an afternoon's picnic if the weather is good. If it isn't then you are likely to find yourself washed into the North Sea. Don't worry, there's a lifeboat station there to rescue you.

    Unfortunately VT doesn't have Spurn as a bone-fide 'location' so my main reportage about spurn is squatting on my Hull page...to read all my words of wisdom see the link below:

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Spurn Point

    by Britannia2 Written Jun 9, 2007

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    Spurn Point

    Spurn Point is a unique spit of land that juts out in to the Humber Estuary - the North Sea on one side and the River Humber on the other. There is a small hamlet here formed of England's only permanent life boat personal and their families.
    A great place for a walk on the beach and watching the many ships that enter and leave the Humber ports everyday.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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    A little known square

    by Britannia2 Written May 1, 2007

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    Kingston Square
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    Kingston Square is a little known sqaure to many visitors unless they visit the New Theatre but it provides quite a haven for workers at lunchtime in the summer and students from the nearby college.
    There is seating and the compulsary pigeons looking for food.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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Kingston upon Hull Off The Beaten Path

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