Cathedral, Canterbury

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    Cathedral west and south
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    Zodiac tile detail
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  • nhcram's Profile Photo

    Canterbury Cathedral

    by nhcram Written Jun 22, 2004

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    Cathedral Grounds Entrance

    Canterbury Cathedral lies at the centre of this historic city.
    It rises above the city and can be some from most angles of Canterbury. It is a UNESCO world Heritage site. The cathedral is linked to many famous people in history, the most famous being Thomas Becket who was murdered here in 1170. The grounds of the cathedral offer peaceful surroundings and places to sit and contemplate the magnifcent building.

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    canterbury cathedral

    by doug48 Written Oct 8, 2006

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    canterbury cathedral

    canterbury cathedral is the oldest and one of the most beautuful in england. the first archbishop of canterbury was st. augustine in 597AD. it is the longest cathedral in europe. canterbury cathedral houses the tombs of king henry IV and prince edward, the black prince. undeniably the most famous archbishop of canterbury was thomas a' becket. becket was murdered by knights of king henry II in the cathedral in 1170. this murder elevated thomas a' becket to a christain martyr and thousands made pilgrimages to the cathedral in medieval times. these pilgrimages were described in geoffrey chaucer's "canterbury tales". an important religious and historical site to visit in england.

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    CANTERBURY CATHEDERAL

    by whitecliff62 Updated Jan 12, 2006

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    CANTERBURY CATHEDERAL

    Iknow, iknow, you've seen it all before loads of times, but you will have to suffer and see it again hahahahaha, anybody that visits this city will surely take a snap shot of this, Canterbury cathederal, thomas becket and all that stuff has been explained over and over again so i won't bore you with the history, just force yourself to have another look at the photo hehehehehe

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  • kentishgirl's Profile Photo

    Canterbury Cathedral

    by kentishgirl Updated Nov 5, 2004

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    outside the cathedral

    The most popular tourist attraction in Canterbury, and by far the most beautful.

    Located in the centre of Canterbury, this magnificent building is viewable from nearly everywhere in the city.

    The home of Christianity, you just have to visit.
    Inside, and out the architecture is amazing, a really peaceful place with many crypts and chapels to immerse yourself in. you will also find the statue of Thomas Becket.

    Light a candle and write a prayer whilst here.

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  • saraheg77's Profile Photo

    Check out Canterbury Cathedral!

    by saraheg77 Updated May 5, 2004

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    Inside Canterbury

    The Canterbury Cathedral is a must see - it just has so much history in it and has been there soooo long! (It was rebuilt in 1077.) Check out the link below for a detailed history and more info about the cathedral. The picture definitely doesn't do it justice. Sorry for the blue border around the picture - I scanned from my scrapbook =) Enjoy the cathedral if you get a chance to go!

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  • Visit the Cathedral

    by Mariajoy Updated Feb 26, 2006

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    Of course you can't come to Canterbury without visiting one of the most architecturally beautiful and historically important cathedral in the UK. This is where Archbishop Thomas a Becket was murdered by four of Henry II's Knights in 1170. His shrine became one of the most important pilgrimage sites of the Middle Ages. Thousands of tourists still flock here every year and it gets incredibly busy in the summer. Check the website for details of opening times for the Cathedral.

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  • Canterbury Cathedral

    by KenMore Written Feb 25, 2003

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    The foundation of this splendid Cathedral dates back to the coming of the first archbishop, Augustine, from Rome in A.D. 597, but the earliest part of the present building is the great Romanesque crypt built circa 1100. The Cathedral is noteworthy for its medieval tombs of royal parsonages, such as King Henry IV and Edward the Black Prince, as well as numerous archbishops. Becket's shrine was destroyed by the Tudor king, but the site of that tomb is in Trinity Chapel, near the High Altar.

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    The interior: Beckett

    by leics Written Jan 21, 2013

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    Site of the murder
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    Canterbury cathedral is possibly most famous for being the site of the martyrdom of St Thomas Becket, slaughtered on the spot now marked by a floor slab and a (rather odd, imo) modern sword sculpture. His murder in 1170, ordered by King Henry ll (although it is probable the king did not expect his outburst to be acted upon) was shocking at the time it occurred and led not only to the king doing formal penance but also to the canonisation of Becket (1173... a very quick canonisation). Some of the miracles ascribed to Beckett (which began almost immediately after his death) can be seen in the beautiful Medieval stained-glass windows in the Trinity Chapel.

    These events swiftly turned the cathedral into a place of pilgrimage (hence the need for lodgings such as Eastbridge Hospital and the writing of Chaucer's 'Canterbury Tales') with Becket's original burial place in the cathedral crypt having holes inside through which pilgrims could kiss the tomb itself.

    Beckett's coffin was moved ('translated') into the cathedral proper in 1220, placed in a shrine which was magnificently jewelled and gilded. There it stayed until the reign of king Henry Vlll. He called for Becket to appear before the court on a charge of treason (speaking against Henry ll) and...amazingly, despite the trumpeter's blowing...Beckett did not appear in order to defend himself. So in 1538 Henry Vlll was able to dismantle the shrine and take all its wealth without being concerned that he had acted illegally.

    Nothing remains of that shrine now, apart from a magnificent Zodiac tiled floor (1200s). A lit candle marks the spot where it once stood. If you go down into the crypt (and you definitely should) you will see a rather wonderful Anthony Gormley sculpture of a man ('Transport'), seemingly suspended in space between his first tomb and the shrine above. The sculpture is made of 400 Medieval nails taken from the cathedral's roof and is really rather wonderful. I note from Gormley's site that it is 'on loan' until 2012: it may not be there when you visit.

    Thomas Beckett is not the only reason for visiting the cathedral, of course (see my other tips). But his story, and its effect on both the cathedral and on the city, is definitely important enough to warrant a tip of its own.

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Cathedral: take the time to look....

    by leics Written Jan 21, 2013

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    Zodiac roundel: Cancer
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    Canterbury cathedral is overwhelming in its size, magnificence and sheer wealth of historical interest.

    Look out for:

    the original battlefield headgear of the Black Prince (1330-1376), looking rather like a large stuffed toy stuck on his helmet!;

    the superb crab representing Cancer on the Zodiac tiles where Beckett's shrine once stood;

    the beautiful Medieval stained-glass windows in Trinity Chapel;

    the detailed wall-painting of the story of St Eustace, dating from 1480 and also in Trinity Chapel;

    two huge stone columns from the original Saxon church at Reculver (670AD) , brought to the cathedral for safekeeping and now in the crypt;

    very early Medieval carved column capitals in the crypt;

    ...and much, much more.

    Do allow yourself plenty of time to explore (an hour really won't be enough): the cathedral is a huge building with a huge amount to see.

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    Cathedral: the exterior

    by leics Written Jan 21, 2013

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    Cathedral west and south
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    Do take the time to have a good look at the exterior of Canterbury's wonderful Medieval cathedral.

    At the time of writing there are ongoing restoration works on the southern and eastern sides, but until those are complete you can still explore the western side.

    You'll find many intricate and detailed carvings, further testament to the superb skill of Medieval craftsmen (as if the sheer size of the structure were not evidence enough). Some have been restored or replaced (you can easily tell by the colour of the stone) but many are original.

    Conserving a building as old as the cathedral is an ongoing, and very expensive, issue. You can read a little about the work of the cathedral stonemasons and conservators on the link below.

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  • hundwalder's Profile Photo

    Canterbury Cathedral.

    by hundwalder Updated Jul 24, 2006

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    front view of Caterbury Cathedral
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    The Canterbury Cathedral which dominates the center of the city, is the longest Christian cathedral in the world, and is also one of the most important places of worship anywhere.

    A church was first built on the site in AD 597, but construction of the present cathedral commenced in 1077. Like all other medieval structures of its size, it took hundreds of years to complete, and several architectural styles were utilized. A bold and very elaborate Gothic style dominates. Photo #1 is a closeup view of the front and of the two enormous belfries that flank the sides of the great arched entranceway. Photo #2 shows the entire length of the cathedral. Walking around the cathedral will give you a real treat in Gothic geometric detail.

    The interior of the church including the vast catacombs, can take hours to explore for those having the time. The very long single nave is surrounded by tombs of royalty, knights, and religious leaders. The tombs which are very ornate, include those of King Henry IV and the black prince. The cathedral is filled with sculptures crafted by the masters.

    Thomas Becket was appointed archbishop of Canterbury in the year 1162, by King Henry II. A legandary struggle later ensued between Becket and the king regarding the rights, priveleges, and policies, of the church in the kingdom of England. The point was eventually reached where the king was facing excommunication from the Catholic church. The king in desperation ordered his knights to assasinate Becket. The location in the cathedral where Becket was assasinated is marked by the altar of the sword's point. A detailed account of the historic event can be heard at the assasination site. Becket is entombed in the cathedral's catacombs.

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  • smschley's Profile Photo

    Canterbury Cathedral

    by smschley Updated Dec 31, 2007

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    Canterbury Cathedral, consecrated sometime around 602 C.E. is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in the world. It is the Cathedral of the Anglican Archbishop of Canterbury, the religious leader of the Church of England.

    The Vikings sacked the church and it was later repaired and enlarged, only to be devastated by a fire in 1067, a year after the Norman conquest of England. By 1077, it was rebuilt as a Norman church, described as "nearly perfect". A staircase and parts of the North Wall remain from that building

    A dark chapter in the history of the Cathedral was the assassination of Thomas Becket in the north-east Transept on Tuesday 29 December 1170 by Knights who overheard King Henry II say "Who will rid me of this meddlesome priest?" or something to that effect when he was having troubles with Becket. The guards took it literally and murdered Becket in his own Cathedral.

    The work of the Cathedral as a monastery came to an end in 1540, when the monastery was closed on the orders of King Henry VIII. After it’s change from Catholicism to the Church of England, its role as a place of prayer continued – as it does to this day. Once the monastery had been suppressed, responsibility for the services and upkeep was given to a group of clergy known as the Dean and Chapter. Today, the Cathedral is still governed by the Dean and four Canons, together with four lay people and the Archdeacon of Maidstone.

    During the Civil War of the 1640s, the Cathedral suffered damage at the hands of the Puritans; much of the medieval stained glass was smashed and horses were stabled in the nave. After the Restoration in 1660, several years were spent in repairing the building.

    In the early 19th Century, the North West tower was demolished in the early 1830s and replaced by a copy of the South West tower, thus giving a symmetrical appearance to the west end of the Cathedral. During the Second World War, the Precincts were heavily damaged by enemy action and the Cathedral’s Library

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    Canterbury Cathedral

    by Tom_Fields Written Nov 18, 2005

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    Canterbury Cathedral
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    Canterbury Cathedral is one of Britain's most historic churches. The first archbishop of Canterbury was St. Augustine, who arrived as a missionary in 597 AD. King Ethelbert gave him a church, which became the first cathedral in Britain.

    In the 12th century, King Henry II appointed his friend Thomas Becket to be Archbishop of Canterbury. Aftter the two had a falling out, and a power struggle, four of King Henry's knights took matters into their own hands. They went into the Cathedral and murdered Becket inside. The site of this crime is marked by a small shrine called the Altar of the Sword's Point (see the last photo).

    During the English Civil War of the 17th century, the Cathedral was sacked by the Puritans. It took years to repair all the damage.

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  • martin_nl's Profile Photo

    Canterbury Cathedral

    by martin_nl Updated Jul 24, 2005

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    The massive Canterbury Cathedral

    As said in the previous tip half the cathedral was sectioned off because there was a ceremony going on all day for the graduates. Because the entrance price to the cathedral was heavily reduced and I didn't really know what to expect of the cathedral's interior anyway I decided to buy a ticket anyway. Previously I hadn't seen any pictures of the interior, so I wouldn't know what I would miss out on either.

    So I went though the gate, and found the most amazing cathedral I have ever seen. I just stood there staring. This is some house of God! And although I'm in the least way religious in any sort of way, I respect the people who invested time money and labour into realising such an amazing piece of work.

    Unfortunately I couldn't enter the church through the main entrance sine the nave was part of the cathedral not open to the public today. Therefore I had to walk around the front to the northern side of the cathedral where the Great Cloister is.

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  • kenyneo's Profile Photo

    Canterbury Cathedral

    by kenyneo Updated Jul 2, 2005

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    Magnificient

    If there is one Cathedral worth visiting , this must be one of them ...

    For at least fourteen hundred years the worship of God has been offered on the site of this Cathedral, and through the prayers of the Church His power and grace have shaped human lives.

    St John’s Gospel, Chapter 12:
    “There were certain Greeks among them, who came up to worship at the feast. They came therefore to Philip, who was of Bethsaida of Galilee, and asked him, saying, “Sir, we would see Jesus.”

    The view after entering the Chirst Church gate

    The Cathedral Church was founded in 597 AD by St Augustine whose original cathedral lies beneath the floor of the nave. It looks vast although in reality, from this point, it is only possible to see about half of its total length of around 540 feet. The main "Bell Harry" Tower rises to 235 feet and is located approximately in the centre of the building. The original Saxon church was destroyed by fire in 1067 and rebuilt again by the Normans in 1070. The quire and some of the ancient stained glass windows date from the 12th century

    Tickets:

    £4.50 Adults
    £3.50 Concessions
    £12.50 Family (with 2 adults)
    £ 10.50 Famiy (with 1 adult)

    My journey

    Before we head for the Cathedral, we had a real English cuisine...something which you can hardly find in London...shame. After a big yummy lunch and a few snapping of pics ( a common ritual of VTers ) . We head straight away to the Cathedral ....its is so huge , collossal indeed ...and towering ....its so difficult to capture it all in a pic ...we are so eagerly queuing for our turn to step inside one of England's most historical place ...and we can even feel aura of the cathedral and occasional breeze of emotions perhaps from the spirits dwelling inside

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