Lancaster Off The Beaten Path

  • Penny's Hospital and Almhouses
    Penny's Hospital and Almhouses
    by spidermiss
  • St John the Evangelist Church, Lancaster
    St John the Evangelist Church, Lancaster
    by spidermiss
  • St John the Evangelist Church, Lancaster
    St John the Evangelist Church, Lancaster
    by spidermiss

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Lancaster

  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    St John the Evangelist Church

    by spidermiss Updated Mar 12, 2012
    St John the Evangelist Church, Lancaster
    1 more image

    St John the Evangelist Church was built in the 18th Century as a chapel annexe to the Lancaster Priory to accommodate the growing town's population. Later on in the same century a tower and spire were added and in the early 20th Century. In 1981, the church closed and became part of the Churches Conservation Trust.

    You can find out further information under this link

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • peachfront's Profile Photo

    Leighton Moss Nature Reserve

    by peachfront Updated Mar 23, 2009
    a stroll through the eerie rattling reed beds

    You can easily catch a train from Lancaster to Silverdale and find the Leighton Moss Nature Reserve. At the time of my visit, no one pays to enter the reserve if you arrive on foot, bike, or public transport. So you really only pay to enter if you bring a car, 4.5 pounds at the time of my visit in late September 2008. Get a map. The reserve is discontinuous, and you don't want to miss anything. Off the beaten path? Probably to the folks who don't realize the bird wealth of the area. However, I visited on a gorgeous day, and there were birders a-plenty, not just tourists but locals too with a picnic lunch.

    I have a full review with some photos here if you scroll down to the section called "Tuesday, September 23:"

    http://peachfront.diaryland.com/noengl1.html

    The sound of the winds in the reed bed is most atmospheric, and who knows? You may see such rarities as Bittern and Bearded Tit. I got my life Goldcrest here.

    Photographers also like the reserve because the blinds make it easy to get good close photos of the birds.

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching
    • Photography

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  • The Golden Ball Pub (Snatchems)

    by MartinSelway Updated Oct 23, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Golden Ball

    Also known locally as "Snatchems". This was the name given to the pub by the locals when Lancaster was a major port. It was in its heyday at the height of the cotton trade. The reason for the name is that when ships were leaving Lancaster, should they be short of a crew member or two, they would put a boat out to The Golden Ball and "snatch" any available (drunken) locals to make up their number.

    On very high tides the road floods.

    Directions: Head out of Lancaster towards Morecambe on the A589 -over the Lune (3 lane bridge) under railway.At first roundabout turn left coming next to a set of traffic lights with ASDA on left and AXA Direct on right - go straight over the lights up to a small roundabout with a Peugeot garage - bear left. There should now be drainage dykes on left and signs warning that the road may be closed at high tide. It a short distance down this road.

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  • Crook O' Lune

    by MartinSelway Updated Oct 17, 2004

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Crook of Lune. Photo LCC.

    This is a really beautiful spot.

    The Crook O'Lune picnic site is situated at a popular beauty spot on a horse shoe bend in the River Lune to the North of Lancaster. Many pleasant walks are available alongside the wooded river banks and venturing off into the surrounding countryside. For longer walks the Lune Millennium Cycleway which also forms part of the Lancashire Cycleway follows a former railway line and connects this site to Lancaster and Bull Beck picnic site to the North.

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  • Forest of Bowland

    by MartinSelway Written Oct 17, 2004

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    Forest of Bowland. Photo LCC.

    The Forest of bowland is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It makes for a great Sunday drive out of Lancaster, perhaps to explore some of the villages, go for a pub lunch or a country walk.

    The Forest of Bowland and Pendle Hill were designated as Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty in February 1964. The Pendle Hill section is geographically detached from the Forest of Bowland section but the two together share the title Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The Forest of Bowland is the eleventh largest of the 40 designated AONB's in England and Wales, situated mainly in the county of Lancashire, part of the area does extend into North Yorkshire. The area is essentially upland country consisting of a plateau of rolling hills and moors which are dissected by deep valleys. In the north, Bowland consists of a block of gritstone moors extending from about 183M to 550M above sea level. In the south of the area the fells are more detached.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Fishing

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  • Great Country Pub Lunch

    by MartinSelway Written Oct 11, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Stork Pub, Conder Green, Nr Lancaster

    A short drive from Lancaster towards Glasson Dock will bring you to the Stork Pub at Conder Green.

    The pub dates back to at least 1660, and it has certainly flourished under a number of names for over 300 years. It takes its present name from the storks that appeared on the family crest of the Starkie family that took over the local estate at the end of the 19th century.

    This is a gem of a country pub that serves a good selection of real ale and food. In fine weather you can sit outside the front or in the sunny beer garden to the rear.

    It does get busy at weekends, but food is served all day on Sunday.

    After a pint you can head off down the lane to the Lune Estuary coastal footpath for a walk if your feeling energetic.

    This Inn appears in both The Good Beer Guide and The Good Pub Guide.

    Related to:
    • Beer Tasting
    • Food and Dining

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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    Penny's Hospital and Almhouses

    by spidermiss Updated Mar 12, 2012
    Penny's Hospital and Almhouses
    1 more image

    Penny's Hospital and Almhouses were built in 1720 by William Penny and were recently restored in 1974.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • rundoyle4's Profile Photo

    take a walk out of town

    by rundoyle4 Written Jan 6, 2007

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    Nothing rejuvenates you soul like a walk in the English countryside. Look over the hedges at the cows and breathe a sigh of relieve.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Study Abroad

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Lancaster Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Lancaster off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Lancaster sightseeing.

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