Lancaster Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by mickeyboy07
  • Things to Do
    by mickeyboy07
  • Things to Do
    by mickeyboy07

Best Rated Things to Do in Lancaster

  • Butterfly House

    by MartinSelway Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Butterfly House, Williamson Park

    The Butterfly House is set within Williamson Park. There is a charge for entry, and although we have never been tempted in, the place is very popular with visitors. The Butterfly House is adjacent to the Cafe and gift shop.

    "Live exotic butterflies fluttering and feeding amidst the flowers, trees and vines in the tropical rain forest housed in the former Palm House. Walk amongst some of the world¹s most beautiful species, including brilliant swallowtails, and cleverly camouflaged Owl butterflies within a natural habitat. The pupae of new butterflies can be seen in a special display case and you may even see a butterfly emerging from its chrysalis!"

    The park is open throughout the year except for Christmas Day, Boxing Day and New Year¹s Day. 10am - 5pm April to September, 10am - 4pm October - March.

    Related to:
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  • Lancaster Castle

    by MartinSelway Updated Oct 10, 2004

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    Lancaster Castle Gates

    The Castle is owned by Her Majesty the Queen, who is the 'Duke of Lancaster'. As well as being a fortification the Castle is also one of Europe’s longest serving operational prisons. Amongst many alleged witches to be brought to Lancaster, the most famous were the Pendle Witches, who were tried, convicted and sentenced to death here. George Fox, the founder of the Quaker movement, was imprisoned in the Castle for 2 years.

    The Grand Jury Room includes some superb Gillow furniture, whilst in the Crown Court the branding iron can still be seen. Many prisoners convicted at the Castle’s Assize Courts were sentenced to transportation to Australia. Visitors can experience briefly what it’s like to be locked in the ancient dungeons.

    In the Shire Hall is a magnificent display of heraldic shields.

    Open daily for guided tours, 10 am to 5pm (Court sittings permitting). Closed Christmas/New Year. Visitors are advised to check opening times.

    Amission is £4 for adults, children & concessions are £2.50. £11 family ticket (but check web site for up to date pricing).

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits

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  • Ashton Memorial

    by MartinSelway Written Oct 10, 2004

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    Ashton Memorial

    When I was living in Lancaster in the late 80's, the Memorial was fenced off and in a very sorry state. I'm pleased to say that it has been restored to its former glory.

    The Ashton Memorial was commissioned by Lord Ashton as a tribute to his late wife. Born in Lancaster, Lord Ashton became a millionaire producing oil cloth and linoleum which was exported from the port all over the world. It serve as reminder of the importance of Lancaster as a thriving commercial centre, not only in times past but now in the 21st century.

    The first floor outdoor viewing gallery provides superb views of the surrounding countryside and across Morecambe Bay (50p charge).

    From the viewing gallery, the Lakeland hills are clearly visible and it is possible to see Blackpool Tower and the Isle of Man.

    The stonework reflects the colour of the sun and can be seen in hues from pale yellow through pure white to deep orange depending on the time of day.

    The memorial is one of Lancaster's best landmarks and a very impressive sight.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

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  • Williamson Park

    by MartinSelway Updated Oct 10, 2004

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    Park view

    This is a really fabulous park. Even when busy, the place absorbs vistors with ease and you can always find a peaceful spot. Aroung every corner there is a surprise, and the views are the best in Lancaster.

    Williamson Park comprises 54 acres of beautiful parkland with enchanting walks and play areas and breathtaking views to the Fylde Coast and the Lake District. The Tropical Butterfly House, Mini-Beasts, Bird Enclosure and Small Mammal section will fascinate all the family and add a touch of the exotic to a visit to Lancaster's leading tourist attraction. Enjoy the pleasant surroundings of the Pavilion Cafe or browse around the Gift Shop packed with all kinds of exciting gift ideas.

    The Park includes the Ashton Memorial (a famous Edwardian folly on the skyline overlooking Lancaster) which was a gift to the City from Lord Ashton, set within the parkland created by his father, James Williamson. The "structure", as it became known locally, was a memorial to Lord Ashton’s first wife. The park was created out of the quarries from which came the stone for most of Lancaster’s buildings. Inside the recently restored Memorial is the Williamson Gallery, with breathtaking views to the Fylde Coast and the Lake District. All the facilities are open daily.

    (See my travelogue for more photos from the park).

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  • Glasson Dock

    by MartinSelway Updated Oct 17, 2004

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    Glasson Dock

    Glasson Dock is a small coastal village a 10 min/ 5 mile drive out of Lancaster. It's first right after passing the Stork pub (excellent stop for food).

    Glasson is a quirky sort of place - a mix of the original inhabitants and the wealthy newcommers; the old working dock and the new yacht basin.

    Glasson grew up around a harbour opened in 1787, following the demise of Lancaster as a port. The Lancaster Canal is linked to the port via a large basin. The canal was important in affording swift distribution of cargo landed at the port into the heart of industrial Lancashire. Glasson is still a thriving port handling over 150,000 tonnes of cargo annually. Attractive and interesting environment with walks right round the harbour. Large public car park.

    Check out the smoke house at the back of the dock where you can buy fresh smoked fish & cheese.

    If your're feeling energetic you can cycle or walk it from Lancaster via the coastal path.

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  • Lancaster Maritime Museum

    by MartinSelway Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Maritime Museum, Lancaster

    This museum is housed in two fine Georgian quayside buildings. We have visited several times. They also have a good cafe. Check out the old warehouse buildings along St George's Quay, which have now been converted into apartments.

    "This award-winning museum was designed by Richard Gillow, and opened as a museum in 1985. Housed in the former Custom House of 1764 in a delightful riverside setting, the Museum covers the Maritime trade of Lancaster, the history of the port, the Lancaster Canal and the fishing industry of the Lune Estuary and Morecambe Bay using sound, smells, reconstructions and audio-visuals. Features include four restored local fishing vessels, and an aquarium. Shop and café."

    Admission is £2 for adults, accompanied children are free. Concessions £1, and admission is free to local residents.

    Open daily except Christmas and New Year
    Easter to October 11.00 to 17.00
    November to Easter 12.30 to 16.00

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

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  • Lancaster Priory Church

    by MartinSelway Written Oct 10, 2004

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    Lancaster Priory Church

    The 15th Century Priory and Parish Church of Lancaster standing by the Castle on the hill overlooking the City is built on the site of a priory which was founded in 1094.

    The interior is mostly medieval but has 13 centuries of history including traces of a Saxon Church including a Saxon doorway with Anglian cross fragments; 14th century choir stalls; superb tapestries; and King's Own Memorial Chapel with historical Regimental Standards and battle honours. The present building holds Viking ornaments, crusaders' coffins and part of Jacobean "three-decker" pulpit.

    In the Memorial Chapel there is probably the most complete collection of Regimental Colours in the country.

    The Refectory offers light refreshments. Guided tours are available by arrangement. Open 10am - 4pm daily all year.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • Judges Lodgings

    by MartinSelway Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Judges Lodgings, Lancaster

    Built around 1625, this is reputedly Lancaster’s oldest Town House and was once home to the chilling witch-hunter Thomas Covell (Pendle Witches 1612), six times Mayor of Lancaster and Keeper of Lancaster Castle for 48 years. In this latter capacity he was responsible for the imprisonment and death of the Lancashire Witches. The house ceased to be a family home in 1824 and became the Judges’ Lodgings house until 1975, acting as the home to visiting Assize Judges.

    Today it contains two distinct museums, the Gillow and Town House Museum, where you will find displays on the history and products of the famous Lancaster cabinet making firm Gillows; and the Museum of Childhood with the nationally acclaimed "Barry Elder" collection.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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    Maritime Museum

    by mickeyboy07 Written Aug 28, 2010

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    Entrance
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    Lancaster Maritime Museum displays the history of the Lancaster and Morcombe Area and tells the fascinating stories of its maritime past.The museum occupies two impressive Georgian buildings alongside the historic quayside.The Custom house,built by the Lancaster port commision in 1764,was designed by architect Richard Gillow of the famous local cabinet making family.Such a grand building with its fine palladian architecture symbolised the prosperity of the city and the success of Lancasters oversea trade in the 18th century.It was restored by Lancaster city council in the early 1980's and opened as a museum in 1985.
    The museum also occupies the top floor of the asjacent five-storey warehouse built between 1780 and 1797.This would have been a hive of activity at the height of the Atlantic trade.

    Shipbuilding
    ---------------
    Originally the weigh room where goods were weighed and checked by custom officials,this area now houses a whammel boat,Hannah(c.1910),used for salmon netting on the River Lune.many boats were built locally and a range of shipbuilding tools is on display.

    Fishing
    ---------
    This is the room where the custom men would have waited for ships to arrive.Today it houses information about inshore fishing such as shrimping,cockling and musseling.The lives of fishing families were centred on the boat and on the cottage kitchen.This room features a recreated fishermens cottage as it would have been c.1925.

    Transatlantic Slavery Gallery
    ------------------------------------
    In 1770 Lancaster was the fourth largest port in England.Part of its Prosperity came from the slave trade.Between 1736 and 1807 Lancaster's merchants transported over 29,000 captured Africans.Some of the fine buildings in Lancaster were built on the profiles of the slave trade and a single successful voyage couls make a mans fortune.

    This just a part of what the museum has to show and on offer.
    Facilities include a small cafe,gift shop and restrooms.

    Prices are £3 for adults and free to children under age 16.

    opening times-Easter to October:all week 11am till 5pm
    November to Easter:all week 12.30pm till 4pm

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Family Travel

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  • Jubilee Tower

    by MartinSelway Written Oct 10, 2004

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    Jubilee Tower, Lancaster

    Capture breathtaking views of the stunningly diverse landscape of Lancaster, Morecambe and the Lune Valley. The Tower, built to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee, makes a superb viewing platform. From this exposed but beautiful location high on the fells there is a superb view over the Fylde and North Lancashire coast line and the Yorkshire Dales.

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    Lancaster Castle

    by mickeyboy07 Written Sep 24, 2012

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    A medieval castle located in Lancaster centre.Its early history is unclear,but may have been founded in the 11th century on the site of a Roman Fort overlooking a crossing of the River Lune.In 1164,the Honour of Lancaster,including the castle,came under Royal control.In 1332 and 1339 the Scots invaded England,progressing as far as Lancaster and damaging the castle.It was not to see military action again until the English Civil War in 1643.The castle was first used as a prison in 1196 although this apsect became more important during the Civil War.The castle buildings are owned by Lancashire County Council,which leases a major part of the structure to the Ministry of Justice who operate a Crown Court in part of the building.The site is owned by the Duchy of Lancaster.today the castle still acts as a prison for young offenders and a remand centre,this began in March 1993.There are tours of most of the castle 7 days a week from 10am till 5pm.
    Prices:Adults-£5,Family of four-£14.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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    Roman Bath House

    by mickeyboy07 Written Sep 24, 2012

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    Discovered and excavated in 1973-4 in Vicarage field in Lancaster.It formed one end of a large courtyard house,probably the home of a Roman Official.It was demolished in about 340AD to make way for a new and massive stone fort.Part of the fort wall known as 'Wery Wall' can also be seen.The site is fenced off by iron railings but is clearly visible and free of charge.
    There is a foot path that runs behind the castle and priory that leads you to Vicerage Field.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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    Ashton Memorial

    by rundoyle4 Written Jan 7, 2007

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    up in the distance

    The monument at the top of the hills can be seen from most of town. It was built by Lord Ashton for his second wife (I think). If the history of a textile merchant and his loves doesn't excite you, the climb up is a great walk and you get an amazing view of the entire city.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Study Abroad
    • Historical Travel

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    Vets Unite

    by rundoyle4 Written Jan 7, 2007

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    This is a tip for students studying abroad whom are interested in veterinary medicine. I set up an independent study with the Bay Veterinary Group. It was a lot of fun. I got to see both small and large animal medicine. Riding around the English countryside like James Herriot is loads of fun.

    Related to:
    • Study Abroad

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  • Canal side walk

    by MartinSelway Written May 22, 2005

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    Lancaster Canal

    The canal runs right through Lancaster, and is one of many things that helps to make this a special city.

    My favourite part of the canal is the walk from the Town Centre to Aldcliffe - I used to live in Aldcliffe while studying at At Martin's College, and so have walked this route hundreds of times.

    It's a great spot to stop at the Water Witch pub, or have a look at the very expensive and exclusive property across the other side of the bank in the private estate.

    At the Aldcliffe you can head off down the minor road to the coastal estuary or carry on the canal path.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Archeology
    • Hiking and Walking

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Lancaster Things to Do

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