Leicester Things to Do

  • Gardens from the canal
    Gardens from the canal
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Most Recent Things to Do in Leicester

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    Leicester Town Hall

    by spidermiss Updated May 12, 2014

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    Leicester Town Hall
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    Leicester Town Hall was built on a site of a former cattle market in 1876. It was designed, in a Queen Anne Style, by Francis Hames and took two years to build. Before the town hall was built, civic affairs used to take place at the Guildhall. It used to house a former courtroom, common with many municipal halls across the country. In front of the town hall are there is the beautiful ornamental fountain which was given to Leicester by a former Mayor, Israel Hart, and was also designed by Francis Hart and unveiled in 1879.

    The square was busy when I visited as there was a wedding happening at the same time.

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    Leicester Cathedral

    by spidermiss Updated May 12, 2014

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    Leicester Cathedral
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    It was originally known as St Martin's Church since the Normans built the original church 900 years ago. During the 1400s-1500s, after subsequent extensions, it became the 'Civic Church' and over a century ago Raphael Brandon redesigned the church including an addition of the 220ft spire. In 1927 the church was renamed as Leicester Cathedral and the town then gained it's city status.

    At the Cathedral I learnt a bit about Richard III from the one of the cathedral guides and the plans for former King's reinternment. There's an interesting website about King Richard III and Leicester Cathedral.

    More information about the cathedral can be found here.
    .

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    Clock Tower

    by spidermiss Updated May 11, 2014
    Clock Tower, Haymarket, Leicester

    The Clock Tower was municipally erected in 1868 in remembrance of Simon De Montfort, William Wyggeston, Sir Thomas White and Alderman Gabriel Newton who were Leicester's benefactors. The Grade II listed building was designed by Joseph Goddard and sculpted by Samuel Barfield with the clock supplied by Croydon's Gillett and Bland. The Clock Tower originally served as a traffic island and pedestrian refuge as well as a memorial to the Leicester's benefactors.

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    The Guildhall

    by spidermiss Updated May 11, 2014
    The Guildhall, Leicester
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    The Guildhall in Leicester was built at the end of the 14th Century originally as a meeting place for the Corpus Christi's Guild. A century later, Leicester's corporation began meeting there after the dissolution of the Guild, and the building was extended to accommodate the corporation's needs. The Guildhall was used for civic proceedings and leisure services until the 19th Century. All the local government functions eventually transferred to the new town hall, which was opened in 1876, and eventually the Guildhall became a city museum (and used for theatrical space) from 1926.

    It's currently hosting the Richard the II Exhibition, free entry, and is running until 1st June 2014. Please check the website for further information.

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    A tour of Bosworth Battlefield

    by stevemt Written Oct 21, 2011

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    The Visitor Centre at Bosworth offers interactive displays and a detailed exhibition, along with an interesting film explaining the events of the battle.

    There is also a replica medieval village, and mock battles and tournaments are held here at various times

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    St James Church - Sutton Cheney

    by stevemt Written Oct 21, 2011

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    This church has strong historical links to Richard the third, it is apparently where he heard his last mass before being killed at the battle of Bosworth, just down the road.

    It is indeed an old building, quite small, well worth a visit, and still a working church.

    If you look carefully at the ground on the left of the path leading to the church from the gate, you can just make out a small hollow that would have been the local pond for fish.

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    Visit Bradgate Park

    by stevemt Written Oct 21, 2011

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    Bradgate Park is a historical site as it contains the ruins of the house Lady Jane Grey grew up in. The ruins are open for inspection at times.

    Bradgate Park is also a very popular outing for local people to come with the family and walk off the excesses of xmas lunch etc.

    The park is a lovely place to visit, the deer roam freely, you can walk for miles, stroll the river, and have a cuppa if you wish

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    St Mary de Castro

    by leics Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    St Mary de Castro

    The ancient church of St. Mary de Castro is sited within what once was the bailey of Leicester castle. It is a fascinating example of how church architecture has changed over the centuries, and is also where Geoffrey Chaucer was married.

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    Leicester Cathedral

    by leics Updated Dec 23, 2010

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    Cathedral spire
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    It's taken me ages to get round to going inside but I was pleasantly surprised by this small cathedral (it was only declared a cathedral in 1927, so was not purpose-built).

    There's been a church on site for about a thousand years (since 1086), dedicated to Saint Martin. You can see just a tiny part of that original church (see photo) but a lot more of the later Medieval building, including some rather wonderful figures depicting the various woes and ailments to which we are all subject (see my cathedral travelogue). And there's a great deal of later restoration work and Victorian interference as well.

    Nevertheless there are some points of interest (apart from the ailing figures):

    1. A memorial slab to King Richard lll in front of the altar. He was slain at the Battle of Bosworth nearby in 1485 and remains the only English king to die in battle. His body was buried at Greyfriars church but local legend has it that during the reign of Henry Vll it was dug up and thrown into the river Soar which flows through the city.

    2. Some rather intricate coloured gravestones displayed in St Catherine's chapel belonging to the Herrick family.

    3. A few remaining Medieval heads carved as arch supports...these are always fascinating, for the stonemasons took them from life. They are likenesses of real local people from that time.

    4. Some rather lovely carved stone angels supporting the roof trusses. Each one is different. The roof itself has been painted as it would have been in Medieval times (as have the ailing figures) which is very pleasing.

    5. A Medieval copy of the 'Adoration of the Lamb' by the Van Eycks (the original is in Gent, Belgium).

    6. A tiny but exquisite Medieval Russian icon (at present...I don't know why it was on display and am unsure as to whether is is always in the cathedral).

    So...a small place, with no real desire to impress by its grandeur, but still worth seeking out for a visit.

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    St Mary de Castro (Mary of the Castle)

    by tim07 Updated Jun 10, 2010

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    This beautiful old church is located next to the Castle Hall. It was founded in 1107 by Robert de Beaumont after he'd been granted the castle by King Henry.

    Inside the church is a stunning oak ceiling with exquisite woodcarvings. The spire was added in 1400 and replaced after being damaged in 1783.

    The church has a notable history, rumours say that Geoffrey Chaucer was married here in 1336. In 1426 as a small boy King Henry VI was knighted within the castle walls.

    The church is said to be haunted and 'ghost walks' are held here.

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    Leicester Cathedral

    by tim07 Updated Jun 10, 2010

    The original church was built some 900 years ago by the Normans. It was rebuilt and enlarged between the 13th and 15th centuries and became the Civic Church. In Victorian times it was restored and a 220ft spire added. In 1927 the building became a Cathedral.

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    The Guildhall

    by tim07 Updated Jun 8, 2010

    Built in about 1390 the Guildhall is one of the best preserved timber framed halls in the country. It's had many uses and lives such as a meeting place for the Corporation of Leicester, library, Mayor's Parlour, courtroom and Town Hall.

    After a renovation programme it was opened to the public as a museum in 1926. Today it's best known as a performance venue, it attracts acts from all over the country.

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    Jewry Wall Museum

    by tim07 Updated Jun 8, 2010

    The Jewry Wall Museum contains archaeological collections of Leicester's history from Prehistoric, Roman and Medieval times.

    In the grounds you'll find one of Leicester's most famous landmarks, the Jewry Wall. It's part of the Roman towns public baths and is considered to be one of the tallest surving pieces of Roman masonary in the UK.

    The museum is free to enter.

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    Castle Gardens

    by tim07 Updated Jun 7, 2010
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    The gardens were the original site of Leicester Castle, all that remains in them today is the large mound it was built on. They are situated between the Castle Hall and the canal.

    A few minutes walk from the city centre the 4 acre gardens are a peaceful place to relax. There's a rock garden, lawns, flower beds and a landing site for canal boats. Also in the gardens is a statue of Richard III, this commemorates his burial nearby following the Battle of Bosworth.

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    Leicester Market

    by tim07 Written Jun 7, 2010

    Leicester Market goes back over 700 years and is Europe's largest covered market. The market has over 300 stalls selling food produce, flowers, clothes, fabric and bric a brac. This lively and busy market is an enjoyable place to explore.

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Leicester Things to Do

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Visit Leicester Cathedral (maybe the newly-discovered bones of King Richard lll will soon be buried there...watch this space!), explore the Roman ruins at Jewry Wall, see the Rutland dinosaur at...

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