Lincoln Cathedral, Lincoln

26 Reviews

Minster Yard, Lincoln LN2 1PX UK 01522 561600

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    Lincoln Cathedral

    by Pomocub Updated Dec 13, 2012
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    Lincoln Cathedral otherwise known as Saint Mary's Cathedral is considered one of the most beautiful gothic buildings in the whole of Europe. It can be seen from practically every location in the city of Lincoln and is by far the most visited and most famous sights of the city.

    Lincoln's first Cathedral was built in 1092 by Bishop Remigious, most of the original Cathedral was destroyed by a fire, it was rebuilt by another Bishop but that was destroyed by an earthquake. The next person to take charge of building the Cathedral was a French Bishop called St Hugh who made the building what it is today. An architectural masterpiece.

    The Lincoln Imp is one of the most famous carvings on the wall of the Cathedral at the top column of the Angel Choir. It was told that the mischievous little Imp was sent down to Earth from Satan and it came to Lincoln Cathedral, the Imp sat on top of the stone column and began throwing stones and rocks at the angel, the angel turned him to stone, so the Imp is still there, sitting on the top of that column in the Cathedral.

    The Cathedral is open 365 days a year however, you can not tour the building on a Sunday as this is a holy day and the Cathedral is only used for church services on this day.

    The Cathedral is hired out once or twice a year by Lincoln University to complete the graduation ceremonies. This is usually in September time.

    There are different types of tours available at the Cathedral (Dates and times are correct in August 2012)

    FLOOR TOUR - Inside the Cathedral
    1st November to the end of February : Daily tours at 11.00am and 2.00pm

    1st March to 31st October : Daily tours at 11.00am, 1.00pm and 3.00pm

    ROOF TOURS - Health and Safety Information must be read before participating - details can be found on the website.
    1st November to the end of February : Daily tours at 1.30pm with an extra tour on Saturday at 11.00am

    1st March to 31st October : Daily tours at 11.00am and 2.00pm

    TOWER TOURS – SATURDAYS ONLY - Health and Safety information must be read before participating, details can be found on the website.
    April : 1.30pm and 3.00pm

    May to September : 12.15am, 1.30pm and 3.00pm

    October : 1.30pm and 3.00pm.

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    Lincoln Cathedral

    by Airpunk Written Jul 23, 2012

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    Lincoln Cathedral at Night
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    Among England‘s Cathedrals, Lincoln has probably one of the most majestic, architecturally interesting and beautiful examples. Lincoln Cathedral is the result of clerical politics right after the Norman Conquest. William the Conqueror wanted to install his fellows in powerful positions and restructure the country in a Norman feudal manner. That included the creation of new dioceses or the restructuring of old ones. Furthermore, Lincoln Cathedral was built – like continental Cathedrals - in the city centre instead of next to a monastery which was the usual way in Anglo-Saxon England.
    Construction began right after the year of the conquest in 1067 but fires, storms and construction faults made rebuilding and restoring necessary well into the 16 th century. This includes the reconstruction of the collapsed crossing tower between 1307 and 1311. The new spire reached a height of 160 metres which made it the first building to be higher than the Pyramides of Egypt. Lincoln Cathedral was the world’s highest building until 1549 when the spire collapsed. The head behind the expansion and reconstruction in the 12 th century was St. Hugh of Avalon, his grave is one of the main points of interest in the Cathedral.
    Lincoln Cathedral is full of small architectural details. The most famous are the Lincoln Imp, one of many decorations in the choir. The little imp attracted particular attention and became the city’s mascot and trademark. The vaults in the south apse are spectacular and known as “crazy vaults”. Other points of interest are the grave of “Little Saint Hugh” which marks out the dimensions of blood libel and anti-Semitism in the Middle Ages.

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    INSIDE LINCOLN CATHEDRAL

    by balhannah Written Feb 1, 2012

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    Inside, are the cathedral's two stained glass rose windows, one is the Dean's Eye from 1220 to the north, and the Bishop's Eye 1330, in the South. There are lot's of beautiful window's

    St. Hugh's Choir, dating from 1360-80, has beautifully carved wooden stalls and carved bench-ends. The choir screen or pulpitum separating choir from nave dates from the 1330s and contains carvings and traces of original paint.

    In the Seamen's Chapel (Great North Transept) is a window commemorating Lincolnshire-born Captain John Smith, one of the pioneers of early settlement in America and the first governor of Virginia. The library and north walk of the cloister were built in 1674 to designs by Sir Christopher Wren.

    There are people interred in Lincoln Cathedral ....
    Richard Fleming (died 1431), Bishop of Lincoln, in the first corpse tomb ever, in a chantry on the north wall.

    Plenty of interest to see as you wander around.

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    LINCOLN CATHEDRAL THE OUTSIDE

    by balhannah Updated Jan 31, 2012

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    William the Conqueror commissioned this beautiful Cathedral to be built.
    Before I even enter this Cathedral, I am in awe of what I am seeing. Built in Lincolnshire Limestone and in gothic style, it had some excellent sculpture's.

    A frieze and related sculpture is believed to date from the time of Bishop Alexander (Bishop of Lincoln from 1123 – 1148). Some have been decaying, so they have been taken down and now are displayed indoors, in the Chapel of St James. Carved copies were made of the original northern panels.

    It was in 1092 that this Cathedral was built by Bishop Remigius and consecrated. Remigius, a Benedictine monk, was the first Norman Bishop of the largest diocese in medieval England.
    In 1141, or possibly earlier, there was a fire which severely damaged the Cathedral, it was rebuilt, then an earthquake in 1185 caused structural damage.
    It has been repaired over the year's and is a magnificent sight, especially from the bottom of the hill in Lincoln, it tower's over the City.

    ENTRY.... free of charge and gaze at the nave; you can spend time of quiet in the Morning Chapel; you can visit the shop.
    If you want to explore further THERE is an entry charge of....
    Adults £6.... Concessions £4.75.... Children £1

    OPEN....365 days.....

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    CATHEDRAL TOWER'S

    by balhannah Updated Jan 31, 2012

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    The Three tower's

    Between 1307 and 1311 the central tower was raised to its present height, then between 1370 & 1400, the western towers were heightened.
    All three towers had spires, and at that time Lincoln Cathedral was reputedly the tallest building in the World, holding this record for 249 years from 1300 to 1549.
    When the central spire collapsed in 1549 it was not rebuilt.

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    Lincoln Cathedral: true top task!

    by Landotravel Updated Nov 14, 2011

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    A mighty front welcomes you
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    Been to Lincoln means visiting its enormous, surprising and mighty Cathedral. Its sight is iconic but when being at its feet it's really overwhelming. In fact, this one was the tallest building in the world for 200 years!. And it's more surprising knowing that this building dates from as early as XIth century!. Its main front -West front- is quite completely Norman and it's the mainly preserved part from that era.

    Everything here is amazing and numbers are so. Entering inside explains you why. High complex Purbeck marble pillars, beautiful nerved and arched roof and coloured stained glass windows made it all mostly in Early English Gothic around the original Norman building configure a place able to house more than 2000 people. Being in here is another supernatural experience. Its height, its powerful shape, its coloured great Dean's eye and Bishop's eye rose windows and orned stone, the magnificent St Hugh's chorus with its intrincately carved flowered screen, the chapter house, the cloister, etc. etc.

    Reading about the building, you can learn that the original Norman church was greatly destroyed by an earthquake and the new Gothic one begun to be built from the opposite side to the remaining Norman West face which led to rectify some details when the new building had to be linked with it. Funny enough, the roof is not straight at this point for they had to end it with some displacement. But effort was worthy. The new church was by far bigger than the old one and was made to be great among greats. It's astounding to note that the actual enormous towers were, in fact, higher for they were originally ended by wooden spires that doubled its height!

    This place has plenty of interesting details: beginning the nave there's a very old dark Tournai marble baptizing font dating from 12th century. Inside the nice St Hugh's choir the precious wooden stalls hold some detailed "misericords" dating from XIVth century. The Angel Choir shows the famous "Lincoln's Imp", a small stone figure with horns and claws, a kind of small devil placed in one arch. The stone tomb of Richard Flemig, bishop of Lincoln, dating from XVth century is surprising for it shows a double corpse: the upper one is the bishop in splendor while the lower one is a kind of decaying corpse with the signs of pain and suffering, a kind of metaphore about life and death. And near it, the nice Eleanor of Castile's -Leonor de Castilla in Spanish- tomb, really a semi-tomb for in here are only buried the queen's viscera; the body is buried at Westminster. She was married to king Edward I and died at XIIIth century near Lincoln.

    At the shop it's possible to get some nice illustrated guides for children that are much better than the standard ones to learn about all these details and much more. The importance of the place deserves it, sure!

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    Bishop Alexander's Tomb

    by iwys Updated Feb 10, 2009

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    Bishop Alexander's Tomb

    Bishop Alexander was born in Blois, France, and was nephew of Roger, Bishop of Salisbury. He was elected to the see of Lincoln in 1123. He built several castles and rebuilt Lincoln Cathedral after the fire of 1141. He died in Normandy in 1147, returning from a trip to Rome.

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    The Bishop's Eye

    by iwys Updated Feb 10, 2009

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    The Bishop's Eye

    The circular, stained glass window at the end of the south transept of Lincoln Cathedral is known as the Bishop's Eye. The window was built in 1320, but the stained glass now on view is made up from fragments of Medieval glass inserted in 1788. The bishop after whom the window is named is Bishop John Dalderby who died in 1320.

    It is an incredibly beautiful window: even more beautiful than the larger East Window.

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    Lincoln Cathedral

    by iwys Updated Feb 10, 2009

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    Lincoln Cathedral
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    When you see Lincoln Cathedral it simply takes your breath away. It was once the world's highest building and it is no exaggeration to say that it is still one of the most magnificent buildings in the world.

    The cathedral was orginally built by Bishop Remigius in 1092. It was badly damaged by a fire in 1141, followed by an earthquake in 1185. It was then rebuilt by St. Hugh. The spire was completed in 1311. With a height of 524 ft (159.7m), it was the tallest building in the world for more than 200 years, until the spire was blown down by a storm in 1549. In case you were wondering, St. Olav's Church in Tallinn then took over the title of tallest building in the world until its spire was destroyed by lightning in 1625. The current dimensions of Lincoln Cathedral are: 147m long, 52.5m wide and 82.5m high.

    Recent visitors have included Tom Hanks, who was here to film three scenes for The Da Vinci Code.

    Admission: Adults £4
    Children, Students & Seniors £3

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    Lincoln Cathedral

    by kayleigh06 Updated Oct 22, 2007

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    We was just passing by here when we seen that we could go to a Castle and Cathedral in more or less the same grounds.

    When we got here, I didn't know what to expect when we pulled up as I hadn't heard of the Cas tle and Cathedral before. What a shock I got when I seen it.

    The old Cathedral which was the tallest building in the world for over 200 years and then a tower had fell down and was never rebuilt.

    The outside of the Cathedral has such an amazing design and all the detail which has been put into the architecture (both inside and out) is wor th the visit alone.

    When we got there, there was a lot of work going on to help keept the structure of the building up. They take a lot of care with this building and it goes to show.

    Inside the building, there is a lot of black gothis design to it. The Cathedral still holds a Mass every Sunday (as we found out when we srrived to the Cathedral) and when the Mass is going on, you aren't allowed to look around the Church un til it is over. Although you are allowed to go and join in with the Mass if you wish to.

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    Lincoln Cathedral: Tallest Building Until 1549

    by supercarys Written Apr 23, 2007

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    Lincoln Cathedral at Night

    Lincoln Cathedral has a rich history running from 1072 when it was first ordered to be built by William the Conqueror. At one stage it was the tallest building in the world, until its spires fell down in a storm in 1549. It remains the tallest cathedral in Europe without a spire.

    In recent times, the cathedral was used in the filming of "The Da Vinci Code"

    One of the popular things to do is find the famous Lincoln Imp, who is sitting with one leg resting on the other somewhere inside the cathedral. The myth says that two imps were blown into Lincoln by the West Wind to cause mayhem (known as the Devil's Wind just outside the cathedral because it blows so fiercely). One of them got into the cathedral and tripped up the bishop, teased the choir and started breaking windows so an angel turned him to stone and he's been sitting in the cathedral ever since. Clue: He is about one foot tall.

    The views from the cathedral walls (outside) are spectacular as the cathedral is set on the top of the only hill in Lincolnshire - you can see for miles and miles.

    Opening times:

    Summer weekdays 7.15 am - 8.00 pm, Saturdays and Sundays 7.15 am - 6.00 pm
    Winter weekdays and Saturdays 7.15 am - 6.00 pm, Sundays 7.15 am - 5.00 pm

    Admission:

    Adults £4.00
    Concessions £3.00
    Children 5 -16 £1.00
    Children under 5 Free

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    Lincoln Cathedral and the Da Vinci code

    by sourbugger Written Mar 8, 2007

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    Westminster cathedral refused permission for the 'Da Vinci' code to be filmed there. Lincoln came to the rescue, allowing it's chapter house to 'double' for Westminster. This of course had nothing to do with the reported £100,000 the filmakers paid.

    Not everyone was happy with the arrangement : Sister Mary Michael, a Catholic nun, conducted a solitary vigil outside in protest against the " blasphemous use of a Holy place to film a book of heresy". No standing on the fence there then.

    The artwork that was added to the walls still remains at present - but I don't know if it will remain as a permanent feature.

    Interestingly, Dan Green (author of Da Vinces pile of claptrap) , has said that the statue of Alfred Lord Tennyson (poet and leading Priory of Sion member), maybe a pointer to the location of where Mary Magdalene is buried - in Lincoln Cathedral itself. Utter cobblers.

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    Listen to a whopping big organ

    by sourbugger Written Mar 6, 2007

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    NOT Colin Walsh.

    I was all ready to make lots of silly jokes about playing with your organ in a cathedral (nudge - nudge), and how you need a good blow through your pipes for optimum performance (wink-wink), but I shall refrain.

    Some people say that Lincoln's organ spoils the look of the cathedral, as the enormous instument (sorry, sarted off again) is situated in the middle of the vast space.

    Regular recitals are given, and the website below will detail when. It is also often in full voice during services or being practiced on at other times.

    A mighty monster to behold.

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    An impish little tip

    by sourbugger Updated Mar 5, 2007

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    Lincoln imp

    This amusing little carving can be found near the high altar at the rear of Lincoln Cathedral, at just above head height on the left hand side. It would appear that the stone carver came up with the the little statue himself - it doesn't have any religious connotations.

    Local legend has it that the imp was blown to Lincoln on the winds during the building of the Cathedral. He caused amazing amounts of mayhem and confusion. As he surveyed his work he was turned into a statue by a passing angel.

    Believe what you like, but the imp has become a symbol of the city, most obviously on the shirts of the 'red imps' - the Lincoln City Football club.

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    Don't forget the Chapter House...............

    by leics Written Mar 18, 2006

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    Wall-painting

    .....................in Lincoln cathedral. It has a wonderful 'umbrella' roof, and beautiful wall-paintings. It's rare for these to survive in UK religious buildings, so make sure you don't miss them. You don't have to pay extra.

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