Earlestown Travel Guide

  • St Helens Canal, Earlsetown
    St Helens Canal, Earlsetown
    by sandysmith
  • down by the canal
    down by the canal
    by sandysmith
  • Derby Row, Vulcan Village
    Derby Row, Vulcan Village
    by sandysmith

Earlestown Transportation

  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    by sandysmith Updated Jul 13, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We arrived in Earlestown by train from Liverpool Lime Street. Earlestown train station was built at the point of intersection of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, opened in 1830, and the Warrington and Newton Railway, which opened in 1831- these two early railways, incidentally forming the first steam railway junction. This junction gives the station its unusual triangular triangular junction with platforms on all 3 sides! Its best to check at the ticket office which side your train goes from before heading to the platforms - quite often the timetable notices have a sub number on the train times, indicating which platform too. There are also frequent services from, Manchester (Victoria and Piccadilly), Warrington (Bank Quay), Chester and then to North Wales.

    railway Junction at Earlestown

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Earlestown Off The Beaten Path

  • Village Green

    Ok so there's not much to see here rerally so we just enjoyed some liquid refreshment in the pub by the village green which is surrounded by 1840's (although restored) cottages that were built for the railway and foundry workers.

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  • Vulcan

    We made the detour from the canal path to Vulcan village - its a bit of a trek as you have to go through the housing estate and right round to the village - it looks a lot closer but there is the Manchester to Liverpool railway line blocking your direct route!The village had a renowned rubber factory but the iron foundy is also renowded for its...

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  • Vulcan village

    The village itself is small with cottages on rows names after cities like London and Sheffield. Just before entering the village proper is this train memorial in the grass. I don't think it will rival Darlington's brick train though ;-)

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Earlestown Sports & Outdoors

  • Canal Path Detour

    Seen here from the St Helens Canal towpath are the cottages in the nearby village of Vulcan - once home to an important rubber industry but more importantly for the iron foundry which built locomotives for the Liverpool and Manchester Railway Company. Before you cross the Sankey Brook the canal can be crossed at Hey lock to make a detour to the...

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  • St Helens Canal Walk II

    Halfway round the St Helens Canal walk a private access road leads to Bradlegh Old Hall - this was a historic moated house wher Richard III once stayed. All that remains today is the moat and old gatehouse.

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  • St Helens Canal Walk I

    The town of Earlestown itself was not the subject of our visit but rather a pleasant 3 mile walk along the St Helens Canal towpath, across the Sankey brook and along a lane flanked by fertile farmland on one side and oak trees on the other and eventually heading full circle back to the swing bridge of the canal.

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Earlestown Favorites

  • Sankey Viaduct

    The Sankey viaduct was opened in 1830, built by Stevenson to carry the Liverpool & Manchester Railway, the first ever passenger service in the world.It was built to cross the canal rather than take the railway acrosss the more usual swing bridges. So this viaduct is historic: the first English Canal of the Industrial Revolution being crossed by the...

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  • Mucky Mountains

    The Sankey brook used to be called "Stinkey brook" as it became the dumping ground for chemical companies in the vicinity. The Mucky Mountains are the remains of old alkaline waste tips from companies such as Muspratt's Vitriol Works which produced Soda . For every ton of product there were two tons of waste- yuk! The area has now been regenerated...

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  • Sankey Brook

    This was the supposed waterway to be developed as the Sankey canal for transporting the coal but its developer Henry Berry craftily realised it would never be wide enough for that purpose and pulled the wool over the eyes of those who would be against such pioneering ideas of a brand new canal! He deliberately did not tell the Sankey Brook...

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