Liverpool Off The Beaten Path

  • Roscoe Street Memorial Gardens
    Roscoe Street Memorial Gardens
    by spidermiss
  • 'A Case History' by John King
    'A Case History' by John King
    by spidermiss
  • 127 Mount Pleasant, Liverpool
    127 Mount Pleasant, Liverpool
    by spidermiss

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Liverpool

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    'A Case History' by John King

    by spidermiss Updated Feb 8, 2015

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    I came across this interesting sculpture of luggage stacked on the pavement on Hope Street. Each suitcase is individually labelled of locals and local organisations who have made a difference in Liverpool especially of those in the arts such as The Beatles. The suitcases might suggest a link with Liverpool's strong migrant history. 'A Case History' by John King was installed on the street in 1998.

    'A Case History' by John King 'A Case History' by John King 'A Case History' by John King
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    Roscoe Street Gardens

    by spidermiss Updated Feb 8, 2015

    Roscoe Street Gardens is named after William Roscoe (1753-1831), an member of Parliament, a historian, a leading abolitionist of the Slave Trade and writer in the 19th Century. The memorial gardens are formerly the site of Renshaw St Unitarian Church (from 1811 to 1899) and where his grave is.

    You can read more about William Roscoe here

    An interesting blog here about the Roscoes of Liverpool.

    Joseph Blanco White, a Spanish writer and political exile, is also buried nearby.

    You can read more about Joseph Blanco White here.

    It was an unexpected but interesting discovery on my recent trip to Liverpool (January 2015).

    Roscoe Street Memorial Gardens Roscoe Street Memorial Gardens Roscoe Street Memorial Gardens Memorial Plaque for Joseph Blanco White Memorial Plaque for William Roscoe
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    Bluecoat

    by spidermiss Updated Nov 3, 2013

    Bluecoat is Liverpool's oldest building. This Grade I Listed building is nearly 300 years old (completed around 1725) and began originally as a religious school, founded by Robert Styth and Bryan Blundell, until at the beginning of the 20th Century. For most of the 20th Century, from 1927, it has been an arts centre and a meeting place for local residents. Bluecoat hosts artists, cultural organisations and independent business. It also has a art gallery (opened in 1968) hosting contemporary exhibitions and live performances.

    You can read more about the history of the building via its website website.

    Bluecoat, Liverpool Bluecoat, Liverpool Bluecoat, Liverpool
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    127 Mount Pleasant

    by spidermiss Updated Oct 13, 2013

    The Grecian style building were known originally as the Wellington Rooms which were built in 1816 and were known as the private assembly rooms of the elite Wellington Club. They attracted Liverpool's high society and the elite!

    In the 1920s these were renamed the Embassy Rooms for special occasion hire but soon after these were auctioned to an unknown buyer. Over the decades the rooms were used a youth club and the basement used as air raid shelter during World War II.

    The building was used as The Liverpool Irish Centre in 1965 (until 1996) and hosted cultural activities and provided an advisory for Irish migrants. The main ballroom was used to host dances, dinners, concerts and so forth for the Irish community.

    Sadly the costs for repairing building enforced the centre to relocate in 1996. The closure was an unpopular decision which resulted in rooftop demonstrations by members of the community. At present there is a big interest in the refurbishment including an Open Heritage Day in 2011 and a Irish Friends of 127 Company was established. You can read more about the company via this website.

    127 Mount Pleasant, Liverpool 127 Mount Pleasant, Liverpool 127 Mount Pleasant, Liverpool 127 Mount Pleasant, Liverpool
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    Memorial to the Engine Room Heroes of the Titanic

    by spidermiss Updated Mar 23, 2013

    This Grade II monument is dedicated to the hereos of the engine room staff who had lost their lives when the Titanic sank in April 1912 and also for other ship fatalities even if the monument is associated strongly with the Titanic. The monument is known as the 'Sacrifice of Working Men' and designed by Sir William Goscombe John. It's is 14.6 metres high in a form of a high obelisk with men (in their working clothes) figures.

    Memorial to the Engine Room Heroes of the Titanic Memorial Close Up! Memorial to the Engine Room Heroes of the Titanic Information about the Memorial Memorial to the Engine Room Heroes of the Titanic
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    Lusitania Propeller

    by spidermiss Updated Mar 23, 2013

    The propeller is part of the RMS Lusitania when it was torpedoed during World War I (1915) off the coast of Southern Ireland. There was a loss of 1,201 lives.

    Here is a useful link which tells you about the history of the tragic event.

    Lusitania Propeller at Albert Dock
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    St Luke's Church

    by spidermiss Updated Mar 23, 2013

    I was making my way from the city centre to meet up with my friends at the coach station when I came across this church. St Luke's Church was known locally as the 'bombed out church' with a public park church yard.

    The church was designed in Gothic style by John Foster at the beginning of the 19th Century and was completed in 1831. The church suffered part of the Liverpool Blitz during World War II (Was bombed on 5th May 1941) and still stands the same since then. Here is a useful website which discusses the history of the church.

    The church is used today by Urban Strawberry Lunch Group, an arts group, who offers a eclectic range of arts including music and film. The group also promotes the history and heritage of the church including tours and host anniversary events commemorating the bombing of St Luke's. Please check out their website for further information including access to the church.

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    St James's House

    by spidermiss Updated Mar 19, 2013

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    The building was designed by Richard Norman Shaw, who also designed Scotland Yard fro the Metropolitan Police, in 1894 and were occupied by White Star Line from 1895 till 1927. The building was perfect as the company's head office because of viewing the arrival and departure of ships at the Mersey River nearby.

    The offices were the main focal point on the morning of the Titanic disaster in 1912 where the media and passengers' relatives congregated for news. White Star occupied the building until 1934 when the company merged with rivals Cunard and from then on the business took place in the Cunard's own offices on Pierhead.

    Today the office is known as Albion Building and next to it is St James's interchange for the buses and trains. Still St James's is know as the spiritual home of The White Star Line.

    St James's House (Known as Albion House) St James's House (Known as Albion House)
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    Sailor Home Gateway

    by spidermiss Updated Nov 5, 2011

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    The Gateway was built in the 1852 as the entrance gates to the Sailors' homes. The gates served the purpose of protecting the Saving Banks and also seaman who returned later than their strict 10pm curfew. The Gateway was returned to the city from Sandwell in August 2011 and is dedicated to all the merchant seaman who visited Liverpool on their voyages.

    The Sailors Home was opened in the city from December 1850 until July 1969 and played a significant role is establishing Liverpool's reputation as a world class sea port after the abolition of the slave trade.

    :

    Liverpool Sailors' Home Gateway Liverpool Sailors' Home Gateway
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    "Turning the Place Over"

    by yooperprof Written Aug 31, 2009

    "Turning the Place Over" is an "installation" that was created for the 2007 Liverpool Art Biennial. When I was in town in June 2009, it was still turning. I presume that eventually it may be dismantled, but for now it still continues to amuse and perhaps startle passers-by.

    Richard Wilson is one of the leading artists of his generation. "Turning the Place Over" has been called the most outstanding installation in Britain to be created this decade. Personally I think it's rather trite, but that's just me.

    It is located opposite Moorfields Station in central Liverpool.

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    Hoylake

    by Britannia2 Written Mar 8, 2009

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    We stayed in Hoylake because I could not find a hotel with vacancies in Liverpool within my price range. If you want a trip to the Merseyside coast Hoylake is a good place for a long walk along a promenade with sea views. There are some good restaurants and cafe bars here too and if you want to read more on Hoylake have a look here on VT.
    Wirral Line train that is West Kirby bound from Liverpool.

    Hoylake
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    Port Sunlight

    by Britannia2 Written Mar 3, 2009

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    This is a heritage village on the Wirral. Built in the early 20th century for workers employed in the Lever Brothers factory this is a village of wide open spaces and interesting places to see within the village. See my full Port Sunlight page for details.
    The village is also home to the Lady Lever Art Gallery.
    Train from James Street, Moorfields, Lime Street or Central (Chester or Ellesmere Port bound) to Port Sunlight.

    Port Sunlight and the Lever Gallery
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    Red Squirrel Walk

    by nylo Written Dec 3, 2008

    Formby is one of the few and disapearing Red Squirrel Sanctuarys. We have been there twice now. The first time we only saw 1 red squirrel and it was quite a distance away. (need to go at the best time to see them, but i dont know when that is!) We also saw a very amusing pheasant type bird which we fed nuts to :) This last time we went we only saw a fox. Was quite a large one, and didnt seemed bothered by us humans at all! The walk itself is in a very peaceful location, can get very cold though. You can also walk across the sand dunes to the beach. Theres a childs play ground too.
    Part of national trust, so if your a member its free!

    the friendly fox :)
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    Super-lamb-banana???

    by nylo Updated Dec 3, 2008

    the superlambanana is a piece of art which has now become one of Liverpools icons! Many minitures were made for the European Capital 80 festivites, painted and decorated then placed all around Liverpool! I love em :)

    the original superlambanana
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    Church of Saint Luke (ruins)

    by veigapaula Written Aug 29, 2008

    Located on the corner of Berry Street and Leece Street, on the way up to the Cathedral, coming from Lime Street.
    It was designed by John Foster, and construction of the building began on April 9, 1811, with consecration taking place on January 12, 1831. On Monday, May 5, 1941, St Luke's was hit and burned by an incendiary bomb. Today a project is being develop for its reconstruction.

    St.Luke's Church St.Luke's Church St.Luke's Church St.Luke's Church St.Luke's Church
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Comments (1)

  • NikkiMcDonagh's Profile Photo
    Nov 15, 2012 at 3:34 AM

    The Cavern Club is on Matthew Street not Water Street.

    • northeast80's Profile Photo
      Nov 15, 2012 at 3:45 AM

      Hello, I'm afraid that your comment doesn't show up near the tip you're refering to. Would you be able to go to the member's page and let them know? Thanks.

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