Miscellaneous, Liverpool

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    Nice Heads
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    The Craft of Art
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    Signage
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  • SapineKuu's Profile Photo

    Tiger Tiger Burning Bright

    by SapineKuu Updated Jun 17, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you walk up Water Street (across the road from the Liver Buildings) keep a look out for the old National Provincial Bank Building on the R/H side just before you reach the Town Hall. The huge doors are decorated with two fantastic ferocious looking tigers. Rubbing the fangs is said to bring good luck and was routinely done by Indian sailors who believed it would ensure them a safe onward passage. Recommeded for all VT's!

    I Bite
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    • Arts and Culture

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    Foundation for Art & Technology (FACT)

    by SapineKuu Updated Jun 17, 2006

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    If you enjoy cinema and visual art why not get along to the brilliant FACT Building. This purpose built arts project was designed by the award winning achitects Austin-Smith:Lord and contains two galleries and three ultra modern cinema screens. These show a combination of arthouse, international and mainstream films. The bar areas are a great place to meet up and hang out. Try to catch a film in 'The Box' This is a small screen with sofa seating and you can take your drinks in with you. A great night out.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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    Top Tip - How to Save Your Soul From the Devil

    by SapineKuu Updated Jun 15, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of the strangest sites in Liverpool must surely be the pyramid tomb in the now disused St Andrew's Church Yard. Why a Pyramid? Well, this tomb holds the body of Liverpool's most infamous gambler William Mackenzie. Mackenzie in his desire to secure a winning Poker hand promised his soul to the devil. He won the game but fell ill shortly after. Fearful that his pact would become reality he used his winnings to have this special tomb erected and within it placed his card table and chair. Upon his death he left instructions to be entombed sitting at the table holding the winning cards. Mackenzie reckoned that by being so interred his faustian pact could not be completed and his soul would remain secure. How cool is that!

    My Spooky  Photo of Mackenzies Tomb
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    • Historical Travel

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    A Graveyard of Triumph & Tragedy

    by SapineKuu Updated Jun 14, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you enjoy wandering around old grave yards you will love St James Cemetery in the shadow of the Anglican Cathedral. The setting is lovely and the graves capture perfectly the success and tragedy of the city. This started life as a quarry and required special ramps and tunnels to transport bodies to their final resting place.
    The cemetery will be of particular interest to American VT's as it contains the graves of people from Kentucky, New York, Pennsylvania and many other states.

    This photo is of a grave of some of those who perished in the Ellan Vannin Tragedy of 1909. The ship of 15 passengers, 21 crew plus 60 tons of cargo foundered in heavy seas on the approach to the Mersey Channel having set off from the Isle of Man that morning.
    All those on board tragically perished.

    Ellan Vannin Tragedy Grave Anglican Cathedral  Viewed From The Grave!

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    Water fun in the city

    by Bigs Written Jan 7, 2005

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    Even in the cold cold days around new year 04 this new fountain found a lot of friends. Well, this little girl was desperately forced to walk through by her mum, but she refused to do it. Dave, Sandy husband was brave enough!!! Should be nicer in summer really....

    Williamson Square

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    Titanic Memorial

    by Bigs Written Jan 4, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sabs took me to this column, as she and Steve missed it out last time. We had to wait for the Mersey ferry anyway and it's just a few meters away from the ferry terminal.

    "To the brave men of the engine room" is not mentioned here Steve!

    Thebrave men of the engine room

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    The world of glass

    by ettenaj Written Nov 17, 2004

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    In a seated auditorium , you can witness the fascinating World of Glass at work with regular demonstrations throughout the day from an experienced team of glass artists. Also there is the Kaleidoscope cafe where you can enjoy a tasty snack or a three course meal, whilst overlooking the canal. Then visit the Studio shop for gifts galore.
    Over 30 displays, films and demonstrations.

    glass blowing

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  • drgrcook's Profile Photo

    Old Warehouses

    by drgrcook Updated Nov 11, 2004

    Walk through the Bluecoat gardens and out into College Lane.

    You are now 200 metres from the main shopping street and back in time.

    Opposite are ancient warehouses that will soon be demolished to make way for the massive Chevasse Park / Bluecoat Triangle development.

    The whole area was devastated by bombs during the 2nd World War and for years has been waste land covered by car parks with the odd building occupied by a variety of tenacious businesses.

    Stand at the base of the warehouse and see the gouges in the brickwork where the goods, swung from the horsedrawn carts by the overhead hoist, hit the walls. Look up, the hoists are still there.

    Close your eyes and imagine the throng of carters, draymen, labourers and foremen shouting and sweating as they handled the never-ending piles of goods that passed through Liverpool in its heyday.

    On a cold morning the visible breath of the horses and men would mingle with the scent of untreated wool, molasses, timber, unwashed sweating bodies and horse droppings.

    Life was cheap and accidents frequent, no hard hats or Health and Safety Executive and no lawyers to claim compensation for widows or workers disabled for life and reduced to a future of begging at best. No wonder that Liverpool was the first place in the world to have a Public Health Medical Officer.

    Wander round the area, there are many of these buildings - they will soon be gone.

    Further photos

    Last view of the old.
    Related to:
    • Archeology

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    What A Divvy

    by steventilly Updated May 18, 2003

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    In St. Andrews churchyard on Rodney Street is this strange memorial. Or at least it looks like a memorial. It's acually a grave. One W. Mackenzie, an ardent gambler, wanted to be buried standing up, holding a winning cards hand. This is the result.

    W. Mackenzie, R.I.P.

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    St. Nicholas' Church

    by steventilly Written May 15, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Standing just over the road from the waterfront is St Nicholas' church. We walked past it on the way into town, and I took this pic because I like dthe look of it. Later when Sabs read a article about public art in Liverpool we saw that its grounds contains a statue called "The Blitz" that looks to be an interesting piece of art. Take a look for it if you pass St. Nicks (the momument is at the roadside of the church grounds, looking across to the Liver Building)

    St Nicholas' Church

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    Oldest Pub in Liverpool

    by sandysmith Updated May 14, 2003

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    I noticed this place just recently walking back towards the pier head for the ferry.

    Liverpool's oldest pub "Ye Hole in Ye Wall" dates back to 1726 and was built on the site near to the first purpose built Quaker meeting house.
    Thursday night they have free curry and rice when its Quiz night!
    The street it is on is one of Liverpool's medieval streets too.

    ye hole in ye wall
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Beer Tasting
    • Food and Dining

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    Docker's Clock

    by sandysmith Written May 13, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This unusual six sided clock can be seen on the river cruise. Known as the dockers' clock as it could be seen from all the compass points. The only other one like it can be found in Russia so its a shame that it is so neglected.

    Just behind the clock is he Stanley Tobaccco warehouse - the largest bonded warehouse in the world.

    docker's clock
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    • Architecture

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  • A STRANGE GRAVE

    by sabsi Written May 6, 2003

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    Next St. Andrew's Church in Rodney Street there is a 15 foot high pyramid which actually is a grave!!! W. Mackenzie, a real gambler, wanted to be buried upright at a card table holding the winning hand. So they built him a pyramid grave.

    The pyramid grave
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Casino and Gambling

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    St Peter's Church

    by royharper Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Location of the historic first meeting of John and Paul. I met the grounds caretaker here who worked for the church back in 1957 (July 6) when John and Paul first jammed together at the St Peter's Church Hall accross the street. The gentleman explained that a few years prior to my being there, the church replaced the stage flooring with new wood, so the original stage that John and Paul played on no longer existed. HOWEVER, he happened to save a good bit of the old flooring and was pleased to present me with a small piece of it as a gift! I can't begin to tell you what a special momento this item is to me. I will always cherish it, as well as the insightful and entertaining conversation offered by this wonderful gentleman.

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  • chrisr's Profile Photo

    A visit to St. Georges Hall is...

    by chrisr Written Aug 24, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A visit to St. Georges Hall is definately a must. They only open it once a year - and that time is NOW.
    If you go round this time of year you will see the world famous Minton tiled floor. It covers the whole of the main hall, tiles are approx 1cm x 1cm in size... so you can imagine how long it took to lay, and also the number of tiles is amazing.It used to be used as the main Crown Court building. The holding cells are still there, if you ask nicely they may show you them if they are closed when you visit.

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