St George’s Hall, Liverpool

8 Reviews

St George's Pl Liverpool L1 1JJ UK +44 151 225 6911

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  • St. George's Hall, Liverpool
    St. George's Hall, Liverpool
    by Airpunk
  • Main Hall, St. George's Hall, Liverpool
    Main Hall, St. George's Hall, Liverpool
    by Airpunk
  • Victorian Ventilation and heating system
    Victorian Ventilation and heating system
    by Airpunk
  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Sculptures and details around St. George's Hall

    by Airpunk Updated Oct 10, 2013
    Queen Victoria in her younger years
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    Take your time and have a look at all the status and sculptures around St. George's Hall. On the eastern side, there are equestrian statues of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. It is one of only a few showing the Queen in younger years. On the steps, you will see the famous 19th century Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli. Further north, close to the Walker Art Gallery, there is a column with a bronze sculpture of the Duke of Wellington.
    St. John's Gardens are located on the western side of St. George's Hall. Here we have another famous 19th century Prime Minister, William Gladstone. Around a dozen of sculptures depicting statesmen, businessmen and military men from the late 19th and early 20th century are shown here. The monument dedicated to the victims of the 1986 Hillsborough disaster is located just below St. John's Gardens and is described in a separate tip.
    Good descriptions of the statues as well as of sculptures and reliefs of the neighbouring buildings (e.g. the Railway Hotel at Lime Street) can be found on the page below.

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    St. George's Hall

    by Airpunk Written Oct 10, 2013
    St. George's Hall, Liverpool
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    When we entered we just expected to see a nice music hall and move further on. Instead, we saw a good exhibition about St. George's Hall as a court and prison building which was the second role next to a music hall. And it was all for free!
    The exhibition was mainly about crime in the 19th century and the different types of punishment. More than often, it were poor people who faced deportation or prison treatment for petty crimes such as stealing food when in need. There was also some information about life in Victorian Liverpool.

    In 1838 and 1839 competitions were held for designs for a new music all and a new court building. Both were won by a young architect called Harvey Lonsdale Elmes who suggested that both buildings can be merged into one and create a monumental structure which would surpass all comparative buildings in the country. Elmes died in 1847, therefore he did not see the opening of the building in 1854. When it opened, it had a revolutionary ventilation system which has some original parts on display today. St. George's Hall is still in use for its original purposes: Music concerts and other events requiring a large hall as well as justice. The only thing which has been removed are the prison cells.

    The building is marked by a Neoclassical style with a mix of Greek and Roman elements. Still, it caused an outrage because some of the reliefs showed.- naked people. In 2004, St. George's Hall became part of Liverpool's UNESCO World heritage site.

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    St. George's Hall

    by yooperprof Written Aug 26, 2009

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    19th Century Exhibition Building that is part of Liverpool's World Heritage Site. The building contains several impressive public rooms, most notable of which is the Grand Concert Hall, one of the finest interior spaces in all of Britain. (Sir Nicholas Pevsner called St. George's one of the finest neo-Grecian buildings in the world.)

    The Hall occupies a prime piece of Liverpool's city centre, adjacent to the Walker Art Gallery and immediately across from Lime Street Station.

    Recent restoration of the building carried a price of some 23 million pounds, and was completed in 2007, in time for Liverpool's year of the Capital of European Culture.

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    St George's Hall

    by stevezero Written Nov 28, 2005

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    St George's Hall, Liverpool
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    St George's Hall is one of the many fine Georgian buildings to be found in Liverpool.
    Completed in 1854, it represents the prosperity in Liverpool in the 19th century. A regular visitor to the hall was Charles Dickens who held many of his readings in the 'Small Concert Hall'. The interior is dominated by the main hall 169 feet long with a floor of Minton tiles which is normally protected from the feet of the day to day users, but opened to viewing usually once a year.

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    St. Georges Hall

    by Bigs Written Jan 8, 2005

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    St Georges Hall

    Maybe the biggest building in the city center (apart from the Anglican church). We could watch it from our hotel room. It's surrounded by Liverpools busiest streets though. Take a stroll around. Next to this building there is the Walker Art Gallery with changing exibitions. Watch out what's on there....

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  • ST. GEORGE'S HALL

    by sabsi Written Jan 5, 2005
    St. George's Hall

    St. George's Hall is one of the finest neoclassical buildings of Europe and it was our next door neighbour from the hotel. It is surrounded by other very nice old buildings (eg the Walker Art Gallery) We like to stay in representative neighbourhoods ;) St. George's Hall was finished in 1854 as law courts and concert hall of wealthy 19th century Liverpool. It is used for conferences and events today.

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    St George's Hall

    by drgrcook Updated Nov 13, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St George's Hall in November

    Built between 1842 and 1854, the architect was 23 year old Harvey Lonsdale Elmes who died of tuberculosis in 1847 at the age of 33, while recuperating in Jamaica, before seeing his masterpiece completed.

    For those arriving at Lime Street Station, St George’s Hall and its adjacent buildings provide an architectural vista equalling anything in the world and are a powerful but elegant reminder of the Liverpool’s wealth in the nineteenth century.

    The website is excellent with detailed views and descriptions. Unfortunately the events calender is two years out of date!

    The beautiful Minton-tiled floor is covered by a wooden floor that is removed once a year to reveal the perfectly preserved tiles. The Assizes that were once held there have moved away and it is now used for cultural events.

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  • M.E.R.V's Profile Photo

    St. Georges Hall

    by M.E.R.V Updated Jan 9, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A museum. And perhaps the most prominent building in Liverpool itself. It's a shame I didn't get to go in(was too late!)but my sis says there really nice paintings in here. Just looking so posh all the time...meow!

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