Harrogate Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by alyf1961
  • Things to Do
    by alyf1961
  • Things to Do
    by alyf1961

Best Rated Things to Do in Harrogate

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    Victoria Gardens

    by mickeyboy07 Written Feb 14, 2013

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    Queen Victoria monument
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    These gardens which include the Queen Victoria monument and Bandstand were erected in 1887 and are located in the town centre of Harrogate,opposite the railway station and provide visitors to the town a small oasis in which to relax and enjoy seasonal floral displays and the occasional brass band concert.The four storey Victoria Shopping centre stands behind the gardens and is also popular with both locals and visitors.

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    • Eco-Tourism
    • Architecture

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    St.Peter's Church

    by mickeyboy07 Written Feb 15, 2013

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    Foundations for this church were first laid in April 1870 and was designed by a 'Mr.Hirst' from Bristol.It consists of a nave of five bays,70 ft in length by 27 ft in breadth,with north and south aisle,each 15 ft wide.A tower bearing a spire is situated at the west end of the south aisle.The first Rev. of the church was L.F.W.Foote appointed in 1870.The church has a ring of eight bells in the tower which were cast by 'John Taylor' of Loughborough,they achieved a certain notoriety when they became the first tower in the United Kingdom to have an injunction made on the bells for an offence of noise pollution.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

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    Have a walk around the Valley Gardens

    by Doug767 Updated Apr 10, 2006

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    Entrance to the Valley Gardens

    Have a stroll around the Valley Gardens... Source of Old Sulphur water Springs, Interesting flowers & plants, Childrens play area and paddling pool, model boat pool, 4 tennis courts, pitch & putt course, Cafe to have a cup of tea/ice cream...

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    Crescent Gardens

    by mickeyboy07 Written Feb 6, 2013

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    Crescent Gardens is a small open area in Central Harrogate surrounded by some of the town's main tourist attractions including the Royal Pump Room,Royal Baths and Royal Hall,as well as the Town Hall.There are plenty of lawns and flower beds that bloom in the summer,its the perfect place to sit and people watch or have lunch or rest stop.There is a pay and display car park within the gardens.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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    A VICTORIAN HEALTH REMEDY

    by alyf1961 Written Jan 7, 2014

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    The Royal Pump room was built on one of the sulphur wells found in Harrogate. This sulphur well is believed to be the strongest sulphur well in Europe. The water from the wells became popular during Victorian times when people would take their holidays to the town to drink and bathe in the water. They believed the water had properties that would increase their health.
    The building was designed by Issac Shutt and it was opened in 1842. Harrogate prospered with the arrival of thousands of visitors each year. These visitors included Charles Dickens and Tsar Nicholas II

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    Harrogate and Spa

    by Drever Updated Apr 8, 2014

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    Majestic Hotel
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    Our first view of Harrogate approaching the town from the west was one of towers and domes. These emanate from the churches of St John and St Luke, the Harrogate Conference Centre, the railway station and the green dome of the Hotel Majestic, all of which sprang up in Victorian times.

    Dr Edmund Deane first publicised the area which became Harrogate when he drew attention to a spring there producing the strongest sulphur water in Great Britain in a published paper in 1626. During the 18th and 19th centuries others found more springs – they were rich mostly in iron or sulphur – and Harrogate developed to become one of Britain’s most celebrated spas, offering cures for everything from gout to nervous tension. Dark Yorkshire stone forms the core of the town. This and its Victorian architecture gives the town its sombre dignity which is offset by gardens, parks and stretches of grassland that give the town its open air.

    As the demand for the cure declined in the face of competition from scientific drugs, Harrogate adapted by becoming a major conference, exhibition and tourist centre. However it remains a picture postcard of chintzy Englishness.

    Behind the Crown Hotel stands the Royal Pump Room, an ornate octagonal birdcage construction dating from 1842. We wandered around the museum of local history it now contains. Through a viewing point in the floor we could see the original well-head in the basement. I knocked back a small glass of mineral water at the counter from this spring known as ‘stinking spaw’. It stank of rotten eggs and my wife catching a whiff declined. Anyway I’m sure I felt more energetic next morning so just think what affect the normal three weeks treatment would have.

    We had a wander in the valley gardens in Bogs Field. Here are many of the sulphur and iron waters used in the spa treatment at the Royal Baths. Thirty-Six springs arise within an acre. No two are exactly alike in chemical composition. Several of the well-heads are still there and even the streams look a salty colour. The ducks and trees seemed normal but maybe they have become tolerant overtime.

    Harrogate was where the grand dame of the English whodunit, Agatha Christie came during her baffling 11-day disappearance in 1926 and where the film producers shot the Vanessa Redgrave film version of that still-unexplained event. She had booked into the Old Swan hotel under a false name. Meanwhile, her abandoned car had sparked the biggest manhunt in English history and the first to use an aeroplane. After almost two weeks, a musician in the hotel orchestra recognised the Queen of Crime from a newspaper photograph and told the police.

    A must when visiting Harrogate is to have a tea or coffee and some cream cakes at Betty’s. It opened its doors in 1919 offering a tempting array of delicious Yorkshire and Continental confections in the shop, and an elegant Café Tearoom served teas and meals in the traditional English style. It was an immediate success and has been going strong since then.

    More than one million customers each year visit Betty’s so often there are queues of people waiting to get in. It is a real Agatha Christie experience, as it hasn’t changed that much since the 1920’s - luxurious finger licking cakes and pastries, afternoon tea to die for and a fine array of coffees and teas. We luckily got a seat near the large glass windows and watched the world go buy in refined and genteel splendour.
    Not cheap but well worth the experience.

    Harrogate's draw as a spa has revived following restoration of the Victorian Royal Baths, a splendid Grade-II listed building in the town centre. Inside it is a colourful Moorish fantasy with Islamic arches and screens, painted ceilings, glazed brickwork and terrazzo floors. Visitors can spend a few hours in the Turkish Baths moving between rooms of varying temperatures to steam and clean. Treatments involving rubber hoses and funnels are no longer available but images appear in sepia-tint photographs lining the entrance hall.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography

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    Royal Pump Room Museum

    by Airpunk Written Jan 27, 2014

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    Royal Pump Room Museum
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    If you have time to see only one thing in Harrogate, pick this. The Royal Pump Room sums up all Harrogate is about. It houses a small museum which describes Harrogate's history, especially the height of the spa fever in the Georgian and Victorian times. At the end you can taste a glass of water from the sulphuric spring. The taste is... let's say: unusual. As the lady at the reception desk said: Most people do not ask for a second glass.

    Admission fee is 3,85 GBP, discounts for children/concessions available. You should plan around 30-45 minutes for the main exhibition. Sometimes, a temporary exhibition is also shown in here.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

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    Valley Gardens

    by tim07 Updated Nov 28, 2010

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    The English Heritage Grade II Listed Valley Gardens along with woodland known as The Pinewoods cover an area of 17 acres. The gardens contain more mineral springs than anywhere else.

    The gardens are a delight to walk round, they also contain historic buildings such as the Sun Pavilion and Colonnades. They are open 24 hours a day all year and entry is free.

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    Montpellier Quarter

    by mickeyboy07 Updated Feb 8, 2013

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    This district of the town centre is were you will find Harrogate's nightlife,also local popular shops and tea rooms,including 'Betty's Tea Rooms' which are regionally renowned.They are owned by 'Bettys and Taylors of Harrogate'-the same company that makes 'Yorkshire Tea'.
    You will also find the 'Mercer Art Gallery' here,home to the districts art collection with over 2000 works of art mainly from the 19th and 20th centuries.The area does have a French flair to it with its European style buildings and boutiques and cafe's.Well worth a visit.

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    Harrogate International Conference Centre

    by spidermiss Updated Mar 22, 2012
    Harrogate International Centre
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    This complex hosts conferences, exhibitions and entertainment. The main auditorium holds up to 2,000 seats and there is the Edwardian Royal Hall that holds 1,000 seats. The Queen Suite offers an abundance of space and can be divided up to 10 individual rooms.

    I attended my graduation ceremony for my diploma at HIC in March 2012. I achieved my Diploma of Higher Education in Humanities with the Open University in July 2011. It was a wonderful day to celebrate the hard work that went towards my diploma and has motivated me to complete my degree and overall University studies.

    There is more information available on website.

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    A VICTORIAN HEALTH REMEDY

    by alyf1961 Written Jan 7, 2014
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    The Royal Pump room was built on one of the sulphur wells found in Harrogate. This sulphur well is believed to be the strongest sulphur well in Europe. The water from the wells became popular during Victorian times when people would take their holidays to the town to drink and bathe in the water. They believed the water had properties that would increase their health.
    The building was designed by Issac Shutt and it was opened in 1842. Harrogate prospered with the arrival of thousands of visitors each year. These visitors included Charles Dickens and Tsar Nicholas II

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    St. Peter's Church

    by Airpunk Written Jan 27, 2014
    St. Peter's Church, Harrogate
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    St. Peter's Church is a small neogothic beauty, located in the city centre of Harrogate. It was built in 1870 and is known for its eight 19th century bells.

    The fact that the church became the first to received an injunction for noise pollution in the late 19th century (for ringing the bells too loud) says a lot about Harrogate's inhabitants.

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    Valley Gardens, Stray and other parks

    by Airpunk Written Jan 31, 2014
    Valley Gardens, Harrogate
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    Harrogate has a green belt which encircles the inner city in the west, south and east. There are beautifully laid out gardens, fountains and many details to see.

    To the west, you will find the Valley Gardens, 17 acres of well-kept paths, grass and flowers. Here, you will also find a tennis court and a playground. Valley Gardens are Grade II listed and part of the overall spa town concept.

    The Stray in the south and east of the city centre are dominated by lawns and trees and are a more down-to-earth recreation area compared to Valley Gardens.

    Right next to the pedestrian zone, you will find Montpellier Gardens and Crescent Gardens which often also has a couple of flower arrangements.

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    Montpellier Gardens

    by spidermiss Updated Apr 9, 2013
    Montpellier Gardens, Harrogate
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    After we had breakfast at Betty's, I had a wander around the gardens whilst my parents did a bit of shopping before we returned to the hotel and get ready for the graduation ceremony.

    I enjoyed having a brief wander around the green space/gardens which are near the historic Montpellier Quarter.

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    Royal Pump Room Museum

    by Doug767 Updated Apr 10, 2006

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    The Royal Pump Room Museum shows an interesting insight into the heritage of being a 'Spa Town'.
    Taste the foul 'Sulphur Water' .... if you dare!

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Harrogate Things to Do

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