Hawes Things to Do

  • Rope works
    Rope works
    by Britannia2
  • Wensleydale Pottery
    Wensleydale Pottery
    by Britannia2
  • Inside the creamery
    Inside the creamery
    by Britannia2

Most Recent Things to Do in Hawes

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    The River Ure

    by Britannia2 Written Jul 17, 2010
    River Ure in Hawes
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    The River Ure rises in the hills above Hawes in Wensleydale and flows 45 miles to its confluence with the River Swale at Boroughbridge. The River Ure is unique among the main Yorkshire Dales rivers in that it does not share its name with the dale that it flows through e.g. the River Wharfe in Wharfedale and the River Nidd in Nidderdale etc. The River Ure flows through Wensleydale and through Hawes and as you will see from the photo is quite scenic with a small waterfall as it flows through the village.

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    Wensleydale Pottery

    by Britannia2 Written Jul 17, 2010
    Wensleydale Pottery

    Situated in an old converted chapel the Wensleydale Pottery is an interseting place to visit.
    A complete range of domestic tableware is made here and you can see throwing, turning, decorating and glazing. There is an exhibition of promotional wares and terracotta garden ware also made.
    Ring before you visit to ensure displays are taking place.

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    The Rope Works

    by Britannia2 Written Jul 17, 2010
    Rope works

    We did intend to visit the Rope Works but it was a Sunday and the building was closed. I am sure summer Sunday opening would prove popular.
    However included here for those that can visit in the week - the rope works show just how ropes are made using traditional methods. I think this is just one of the two remaining rope works left in England (the other is in the Medway towns in Kent).
    You get to see the factory and there is a video to watch showing the history of the factory. My sister has been here and says it is very interesting. Small admission charge.

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    Dales Countryside Museum

    by Britannia2 Written Jul 17, 2010
    Dales Countryside Museum
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    This fascinating museum, managed by the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority, tells the story of the people and landscape of the Yorkshire Dales past and present, and stimulates vistors to think about its future. Displays interpret the development of the Dales from prehistoric times to the present day. Themes include: school days, home life, leisure time, religion, transport, communication and tourism, farming, local crafts and industries.
    The Museum itself is housed in an exciting and imaginative conversion of the Hawes railway station in Wensleydale in the north of the Park. It is designed to be fully accessible for wheelchair users and a wheelchair can be borrowed on site. The Museum has many interactive and hands-on exhibits and object handling sessions can be arranged for pre-booked groups.
    (Taken from the official website)
    Hawes National Park Centre - a networked tourist information centre - can be found in the same building as the Museum. There is a shop and Research Area in the centre.

    The Museum is free for children and also offers a range of educational activities. A selection of events, workshops, demonstrations and exhibitions also run throughout the year.
    £3 admission adults

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    • Trains

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    Wensleydale Creamery

    by Britannia2 Written Jun 28, 2010
    Wensleydale Creamery
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    The Visitor Centre here incorporates a museum, viewing gallery, specialist cheese shop and fully licensed restaurant. It is open 7 days a week Mon - Sat 9.30am – 5pm, Sun 10am – 4.30pm (Winter opening times may vary).
    The ‘ Cheese Experience’ tour takes approximately 30 – 90 mins and the optimum time for viewing cheese-making is between 10.00am & 3.00pm. Cheese is not made every day, so phone first to check before visiting if you wish to see the famous cheese in production.
    After visiting the museum we went through to the viewing gallery overlooking the creamery itself and from here we saw cheese-making underway.
    Admission Charges: Adults £2.50, Children (5-16yrs) £1.50, Under 5's are free. Family Ticket (2 adults and 2 children) £7.00
    Thanks to Wallace and Grommit the famous cheese seems safer than ever before - in 1992 the factory actually closed until a management buy out and the W & G films put up sales by 23%!

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    Hardraw Force

    by Sjalen Updated Aug 27, 2006

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    I have managed to go to Hawes three times so far without seeing England's highest single-drop waterfall...Even if it really isn't more than a couple of miles outside town I have had no time for hiking and last time when we did, it had been a very dry summer and then the fall is supposedly not worth the trek as there is hardly any water. This is otherwise one of the most famous sights in the area if you can make it, not least for the bizarre history around it - once there was even someone walking on a rope across the fall whilst cooking an omelette. The Green Dragon inn nearby is famous for being the hub of many such summertime events, including the Hardraw brass concerts in September and sword dancing which some say is better than the waterfall itself. This is also where you have to pay a pound to be allowed the walk on to the fall.

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    St Margaret's Church

    by Sjalen Updated Aug 25, 2006

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    I cannot tell you that much about the church in Hawes other than that it has a nice Millennium window which celebrates the town's 300 years as a market town (William III gave it its charter). There are also organ recitals here frequently and it is a typical small town church in a relatively high position overlooking the town centre.

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    • Religious Travel

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    Buttertubs Pass

    by Sjalen Updated Aug 25, 2006

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    On one of the highest points along the Wensleydale to Swaledale road is Buttertubs - wonderfully strange sink hole formations (i.e. carved out by rainwater) which have got their name since farmers going from Swaledale to market in Hawes used to rest here to cool the butter either on the way there or if it wasn't sold as they returned.

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    Sheepdog demonstrations

    by Sjalen Updated Aug 25, 2006

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    From June to August, you can usually watch sheepdogs in action once a week on a weekday evening. Either ask the tourist office before your visit, or look out for leaflets and posters all over the pubs and shops in Hawes during summer. The dogs are amazing as they round up flocks of sheep at the mere whistle of the farmer.

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    Ropemaker

    by Sjalen Updated Aug 25, 2006

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    Do you know how really long ropes are made? Thick ones? If not, this is where to find out. Outhwaite's has been a Hawes institution since 1905 but ropes have been made in Hawes long before that as the company was originally owned by the Warton family and people were ropemakers around here as early as 1725 at least. Today, you can see ropes being made for all sorts of purposes including church bells, farming and household use. There is also a shop where lots of things made of...you guessed it, rope, can be bought.

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    Crackin' cheese!

    by Sjalen Updated Aug 24, 2006

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    Immortalised through Wallace and Gromit, the Wensleydale Creamery is where the real stuff comes from. Cheese has been made in the dale since the 1150s when Cistercian monks started making it, before farmers took over after the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the 16th century. I wonder what they would all say today if they knew that their cheese has its own visitors centre where you can see the cheese being made. Just note that cheese isn't made every day of the week so if that is important to you, check before your visit. On days when it is made, it is usually between 10.00 and 14.30. Otherwise, just enjoy the viewing gallery in general and walk through the museum with its artefacts from dairy history. Afterwards, you can shop for cheese yourself, including flavoured with different things such as cranberry, or just have a snack in the restaurant.

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    Dales Countryside Museum

    by Sjalen Updated Aug 23, 2006

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    This is a great little museum...in fact, not that little anymore, which shows life in the Dales throughout history. A Norman invasion, sheep farming and lots more is dealt with here. Personally, I find the lead mining bit with a recreated mine interesting. I am just so fascinated by the way people in the Dales lived in the middle of nowhere on a fellside just to work the leadmines in a miserable environment that cannot have been as gorgeous to them as it is to us today. Then when the mines closed, lots of families had no income and had to abandon the Dales for the big industrial cities where they didn't belong at all...

    The museum is merged with Hawes old railway station and therefore has a real living feel to it as it tells you of how the railway came to Hawes, making it outgrow other Upper Wensleydale villages. This is also where you find the local National Park centre full of information and souvenirs.

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    Askrigg

    by Sjalen Written Aug 21, 2006

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    Askrigg

    The village where most outdoor scenes in the James Herriot "All Creatures...." TV series were filmed (another being Reeth and the opening scene Arkengarth, both in Swaledale), this is a lovely little village tucked away on its own between Hawes and Aysgarth. My picture is not that good but you can still see the village nestling off the main road.

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    Wensley falls

    by Sjalen Updated Aug 25, 2006

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    Failing Hardraw, I have had to make do with the small river Wensley's falls in central Hawes. Not at all as dramatic but quite nice to have them in the middle of town still.

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    • National/State Park
    • Family Travel

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Hawes Things to Do

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