Ingleton Things to Do

  • The loneliest ice cream van??
    The loneliest ice cream van??
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  • Ingleborough from the walk
    Ingleborough from the walk
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  • Looking back to the steps at the entrance.
    Looking back to the steps at the...
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Best Rated Things to Do in Ingleton

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    Yordas Cave

    by nickandchris Updated Aug 5, 2010

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    Entrance to Yordas Cave.
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    A couple of weeks ago we had approached this cave from the other end, from the road from Dent and had been kindly shown in by a family about to explore it.As we had no torch with us a that time, we vowed we would return and so we did, from the road from Ingleton end.

    We were kitted up in full waterproofs and I had wellies on, whereas Nick only had walking boots.We left a note on our motorbike saying where we were going and at what time, just in case anything terrible happened. We took a couple of big torches and were ready. We met a group of men who had just come out of the cave so we were lucky to have the place to ourselves.

    The cave is enormous, even our powerful torches weren't good enough to pick all the formations out. I tried taking a few photos but the spray from the river and he poor light made them rather blurry.

    As Nick only had boots on, he wasn't prepared to walk in the river that runs through the cave so it was up to me to venture further on. Walking upstream in the colossal cavern I came to a slight turn in the wall and followed the thundering sound. Here, through a gap, was a tremendous waterfall cascading from somewhere high above. What an amazing sight!!I was very aware that I was out of sight from Nick and he would be panicking so I didn't dally too long and waded back to him.

    Yordas cave was apparently a show cave in Victorian times but the only evidence nowadays is three concrete steps into the cave. I wonder what happened? A rockfall, possibly? I felt priveleged to have seen this wonderful underground world and it brought back memories of my two pot holing experiences I had had in my younger years.

    There are pot holes dotted all along this valley and we passed a few groups kitting up for expeditions.

    Yordas is Viking for underground river.

    Outside,on the rocks forming the campfire, were two socks, filthy and soaking wet!!

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    Show Caves

    by nickandchris Updated Aug 4, 2010

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    The car park at White Scar caves

    Ingleton is famous for it's showcave, Whitescar, and close by is also Ingleborough Cave, near Clapham. Having visited Whitescar Cave many years ago, we didn't feel the urge to follow the crowds through a guided tour. Looking acoss the valley towards Ingleborough,where the cave is, we could see the car park and it looked pretty busy.

    This cave was discovered in 1923 by a student and today, a guide takes you through a series of tunnels, passing waterfalls and wonderful rock formations into the grand finale, the Battlefield Cavern. This is over 330 feet long and 100 feet high, an awesome sight indeed.

    I don't think we have visited Ingleborough Cave, so I guess one of these days we'll have to make the effort.To reach it you must walk for a couple of kilometres and then, once inside, half a kilometre of concrete paths takes you through this cave.Only a faction of it is open to the public, explorations and discoveries are ongoing today.

    http://www.ingleboroughcave.co.uk/index.shtml

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    Touring The Minor Roads

    by nickandchris Updated Aug 7, 2010

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    The way to travel these roads.
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    The scenery around Ingleton is too good to be missed but seeing it does involve some narrow roads. We did not want to venture along these in our motorhome so off came the motorbike and on went the helmets.

    We first went to Kingsdale valley, passing the tiny hamet of Thornton-in-Lonsdale. This is a great road with lovely views to the limestone crags across the valley.This route has it's fair share of pot-holes, as in underground caves and passages although most involve a bit of a walk to get to.This road finally joins another minor road close to Dent in Dentdale.

    Next up was the road along Thistleton, which runs parallel with the B6255 to Chapel le Dale and Ribblehead. It climbs steeply and narrowly up out of Ingleton just before the waterfall Walk. As you proceed, the road becomes unfenced offering plenty of grassy areas to pull off. We did notice one part where the farmer most definitely did not want you parking on his land, with numerous "no parking" signs in evidence. There are great views to Ingleborough from this valley and it is exceptionally scenic in a wild and barren sort of way. We were intrigued by many of the rivers that simply appeared coming up from the ground, see photo four, this was one of those. These undoubtedly flowed underground, chiseling out all manner of tunnels before re-emerging into daylight. Fascinating to imagine what lay beneath our feet!

    In the afternoon, we toured south of Ingleton, as far as The Great Stone of Fourstones, on the Slaidburn road, another wild, moorland road. We took in the village of Bentham and some of the very minor roads back to Clapham Station, hardly passing another vehicle. A wonderful day out on the bike and we had managed to stay dry!!!

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    Great Stone of Four Stones

    by nickandchris Updated Aug 3, 2010

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    From the road.
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    This huge boulder sits atop vast, empty moorland, on the Lancashire/Yorkshire border. It sits above the small market town of Bentham and is in the Forest of Bowland.

    This relic from the Ice Age is not easily missed on the wild, deserted moors. At one time, there were four stones, deposited by a glacier, but as time went on, three of the stones were taken away and most probably used for building material. Very faint indents on the ground signify the position of the lost stones.

    There are many legends about the Fourstones, some found on the website below. One says a witch dropped the stones on her way to build the Devil's Bridge at Kirkby Lonsdale. It is also said that markets were held here, away from plague infested towns. All very interesting, if not a little fanciful. Depends whether you have a good imagination, I suppose!!!

    Nowadays, the stone is well visited, although when we were there, there wasn't a soul about. Steps cut into the side of the rock have worn smooth with age. I let Philip and Nick climb up but didn't attempt it myself! Names carved into the rock date as far back as the 1600's.

    You can park on the road side close by.

    2010 update. Re-visited on yet another bleak day and not a soul in sight!

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    Waterfall Walk

    by bugalugs Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Joe at Thornton Force

    The Waterfall Walk is an absolute must if visiting Ingleton. This walk passes through stunning scenery, through woodland, onto open moors, over streams and past cascading waterfalls. The walk is 4.5 miles/8 kilometers.

    It costs £7.00 to park your car which includes entrance for up to 2 adults and 3 children under 16 years.
    Paying singly it is £3.50 per adult, Child £1.50 under 16.
    There are toilets and a cafe and picnic tables.

    The name of this Waterfall is Thornton Force.

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    Waterfall Walk

    by bugalugs Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Yorkshire Dales is famous for its 'Three Peaks' and in the background you can see one of these peaks which is called Ingleborough. The other two are called Whernside and Penyghent. A path leads up from the village to walk these peaks or you can go a little way further along the main road to Clapham.

    Along here is Ingleborough Cave and Gaping Gill where you can see the highest underground watererfall in Britain. These caves were discovered in 1837 and there are tours every hour on the hours.Tel No. for the caves is 01524 251242

    As you can see in the photo there are benches along the Waterfall Walk so sit and rest your weary legs!

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    Waterfall Walk

    by bugalugs Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    You can take your dog into the Waterfall Walk, however in certain areas, especially open farm/moor land, they must be on a lead.

    Also it is advisable to wear strong shoes/boots, as the terrain can be very muddy if there has been a lot of rain.

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    Chapel le Dale

    by nickandchris Updated Aug 11, 2010

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    St. Leonard's church, Chapel le Dale.
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    This is a tiny hamlet, some two miles from Ingleton, close to the junction of the B6255. St. Leonard's church is the main building here, built in the 17thc and having a fitting memorial to those who lost their lives in the construction of the Settle to Carlisle railway and in particular, between the Ribblehead viaduct (close by) and Dent Head.

    We travelled the minor road from Ingleton to Chapel le Dale, which runs parallel to the B6255. It is a lovely route, the wide valley is full of limestone crags and streams with Ingleborough forming one side and Whernside the other. A few scant farms are dotted along the way but other than that, it's wonderfully quiet.

    Nearby, on the B6255, is the Hill Inn, offering both liquid and solid refreshments! It also has a 5 van only caravan site.

    Having a brief look round the graveyard, I was intrigued by the grave stone in photo 3. I haven't been able to find anything about it.

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    Landscapes.

    by nickandchris Updated Aug 10, 2010

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    Stratas in the rock.
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    This whole area is a nature lover's Paradise. Limestone pavements, clints and grikes with wild flowers clinging to life, reaching for light from their existence amongst the limestone cacks,great rocks from glaciers seemingly halted mid flow and stratad cliffs. Rivers emerging from hillsides, disappearing into cracks into the centre of the earth, caverns and pot holes. Rivers to walk along, fish from, paddle in. Waterfalls to bathe in, wonder at. Wild mushrooms to spot and gather for dinner. It's all there for the taking.Simply take time, slow down and appreciate all that is around you.

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    Ingleton Itself...

    by nickandchris Updated Aug 3, 2010

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    Ingleton's main street
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    Once you have navigated yourself around the one way system you will probably have to return to one of the main pay and display car parks. There is limited parking in the town but as we were on the motorbike, we were easily able to park.

    The main street narrows down and on either side are a variety of tourist and every day shops interspersed with cafes and tea rooms, as well as a couple of pubs.

    Photos one and two show the main street, festooned with flags from the gala, a couple of weeks age. I particularly liked the wierd shape of the Barclays bank building in photo 2.

    Photo three is of a small alleyway of original cottages with flower decked window sills. We noticed the old cludgies opposite the houses.

    Photo 4 is taken in the millenium garden with it's rather nice mosaic plaque. We sat and had our coffee here.

    Photo 5 is taken from the garden, looking towards the Swilla Glen viaduct which carries the railway through the town, over the river Greta.

    The town has a tourist information office which provides valuable information for it's many visitors.

    The waterfalls walk starts from the other side of the river, where there is a large car park. Admission charge.

    Ingleborough (2372 feet) is the more famous of the three peaks walk, the other two being Whernside and Pen -y- Ghent.

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    Up The Twiss and Down The Doe Waterfalls Walk.

    by nickandchris Written Oct 19, 2010

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    4 more images

    This is a must do walk, even if it does cost £4.50 a head!!

    Being in the motorhome,The ticket attendant advised us to park in a seperate section of the park, making sure we didn't end up hemmed in.

    The circular walk is some four miles long, taking you up the river Twiss and back down the River Doe. It involves lots of steps and some steep gradients but is a well maintained footpath and well signposted. Walking boots are adviseable.

    After a week of dry weather, the falls were not at their best but still offered a decent enough showing. I won't go into great detail about every fall as you can visit the website for that information, this is just a personal account.

    I always love walking along rivers so this walk was no chore. The differing scenery interested us, gorges and cliffs with trees clinging precariously to the sides (why do they want to grow in these inaccessible reaches??)old quarry workings and open moorland all had their own appeal.

    The highest fall is Thornton Force (my maiden name so of great interest to me!) which forms a curtain in front of the cliff it falls over. I believe you can wallk behind it at times but we weren't brave or stupid enough to do so.

    As you cross from one river to the other, you follow a lane with not a building in sight,where, low and behold, an icecream van awaits your custom. I found it most amusing, so out on a limb!! There is also a snack kiosk before Thornton Force and a tearoom at Beezley Farm.

    Around Beezley there are stupendous views of Kingsdale and Ingleborough, particularly on a clear day!

    Personally, we found the second stage of the walk, the Doe, more spectacular than the Twiss, with many pools and the Baxenghyll Gorge where the river narrows right down and drops significantly.

    Eventually, after passing more disused quarry workings,the walk arrives at the top end of Ingleton from where a downhill saunter leads you back to the carpark.

    More photos on travelogue.

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  • Waterfalls Walk

    by MartinSelway Written Oct 24, 2004

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    The famous Waterfalls Walk has some of the most spectacular waterfall and woodland scenery in the North of England. The walk is 4.5 miles/8 kilometres through ancient oak woodland and magnificent Dales scenery via a series of spectacular waterfalls and geological features.

    You will need to allow 2.5 to 4 hours to complete the full route. The walk follows a well-defined footpath over moderately inclined ground.

    The walk is open seven days a week, all year round, 9.00am until dusk. If you require further information on opening times ring the pay kiosk at the entrance to the walk on 015242 41930.

    Cars £6.00 (including passengers) OR Adults £3.00, Children £1.00, Concessions £2.00

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    Waterfall Walk

    by bugalugs Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Thornton Force

    Thornton Force waterfall has a drop of 14 metres over limestone rocks.
    You can actually (if your adventerous) clamber over the rocks and sit behind the waterfall.
    This is a photo of Joe behind the waterfall.

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    Waterfall Walk

    by bugalugs Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Waterfall Walk first opened to the public in 1885. Before that it had been virtually inaccessable. Paths and bridges were constructed and it opened on Good Friday 11th April 1885.

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    Waterfall Walk

    by bugalugs Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This walk may not be suitable for everyone, parts of the walk are up steep steps and therefore not accessable for some.

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Ingleton Things to Do

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