Knaresborough Travel Guide

  • The oldest chemist shop in England
    The oldest chemist shop in England
    by Drever
  • Knaresborough
    Knaresborough
    by Drever
  • The bottom floor of Knaresborough Castle
    The bottom floor of Knaresborough Castle
    by Drever

Knaresborough Highlights

  • Pro
    Kaysta profile photo

    Kaysta says…

     The views, friendly people, things to see and do 

  • Con
    p72endragon profile photo

    p72endragon says…

     It's pretty much all on a hill! 

  • In a nutshell
    Sjalen profile photo

    Sjalen says…

     Hidden gem in Yorkshire 

Knaresborough Things to Do

  • Knaresborough and Castle

    Viewed from the riverbank Knaresborough resembles a chaotic patchwork of colourful buildings clinging precariously to the sides of the gorge rising steeply from the River Nidd. As I discovered it has much to offer - a castle, the oldest chemist shop in England, historic streets, boating and a mixture of charming buildings - including a house built...

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  • KNARESBOROUGH WOOD CARVEINGS

    WALKING THE RIVER NIDD WHEN VISITING KNARESBOROUGH IS A MUST IT IS VERY PEACEFUL AND HAS REAL CHARM,BUT IF THERE IS ONE THING YOU DONT EXPECT TO SEE IT IS A DRAGON AND A ROCK CARVED CHAPEL,THESE ARE ONLY 2 OF THE THING YOU WILL SEE ,SO GO AND PAY A VISIT.

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  • The Castle

    The castle sits on top of a large cliff and the ruins command a view of the River Nidd and Forest of Knaresborough. On a clear day you can see for miles from up here.All that is left today is the ruins of the keep but it is well maintained and grassed and a pleasant place to walk and sit and of course , enjoy the view.Oliver Cromwell had the castle...

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  • Mother Shiptons Caves

    Mother Shipton was an English witch who lived in the river side area of Knaresborough who made correct predictions on the fire of London in 1666, iron ships and the fate of several monarchs in her lifetime.Perhaps she knew of the petrifying well here - the only one its sort in England where 700 gallons or 3200 litres of water flow over the well...

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  • Art in the Mill

    A mix of paintings, photography , carvings, ceramics , wood, glass and sculpture can be found in this gallery situated in a courtyard setting.The Blue Skies Gallery has a regular changing programme of work from Yorkshire artisits and also artists from further afield.The gallery is situated in an old flax mill dating from 1808.

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  • Tourist Information Centre

    The Tourist Information Centre is just off the Market Place, close to the 12th century castle ruins.

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  • The Market Square

    A good central place to sit and watch the world go by - the shopping streets mainly radiate from here and there is a small market cross here.

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  • The Old Chemists Shop

    This is Englands oldest chemist shop although today its only links with the past and its apothacary links is the Lavender Water made by a Mrs Lawrence back in 1720 when the shop opened.Today the shop is on two levels - the ground floor is a wonderful array of chocolates, old fashioned sweets, toffees, jams and preserves and upstairs (and outside in...

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  • Painted Windows

    A unique thing to see in Knaresborugh are the painted windows in the town centre. The windows and their locations are - Gracious Street (Ginger Lacey - a famous pilot), Briggate (Guy Fawkes - local man who tried to blow up parliament in 1605), Castlegate - three windows (King John, a window cleaner and Mother Shipton), Market Place (Blind Jack - a...

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  • Bilnd Jack public seat

    John Metcalf (1717–1810), also known as Blind Jack of Knaresborough or Blind Jack Metcalf, was the first of the professional road builders to emerge during the British Industrial Revolution.In the period 1765 to 1792 he built about 180 miles (290 km) of turnpike road, mainly in the north of England.He was born on 15 August 1717 in Knaresborough...

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  • The House in the Rock

    The House in the Rock were built by a linen weaver Thomas Hill. The work began in 1770, It took 16 years to build and consisted of four rooms, in the affect of a lighthouse, one room on top of the other.Thomas Hill, his wife and family lived in the house. The descents of Thomas Hill lived in the house until 1996 when renovating took place. It is in...

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  • KNARESBOROUGH CASTLE

    Knaresborough castle was built around 1100 by a Norman baron. It is situated on a cliff overlooking the River Nidd. Hugh de Moreville took refuge here in the 1170's after assassinating Thomas Becket.Edward I rebuilt the castle between 1301 and 1307.John of Gaunt acquired the castle in 1372 and added it to the vast holdings of the duchy of...

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Knaresborough Hotels

Knaresborough Restaurants

  • Fish and chips

    A traditional Yorkshire fish and chip restaurant that is open from 11.00 until late for take away food although the restaurant closes at 21.00.The tables are as they should be in a fish and chip restaurant with red tablecloth and traditional pottery. The young staff members are friendly and service was fast and efficient on a summer Sunday...

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  • Friendly staff, Good food

    We were pleased to have found somewhere to eat, even more so when we found out how friendly and helpful the staff were.This Cantonese Restaurant has seating for about 60. We were shown to a table in a conservatory area of the dining area. (The Restaurant is reached down a flight of stairs - WC is on the upper floor (near the entrance)When we...

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  • AN OLDE TEA SHOPPE.

    Hannah's house is a delightful cafe. Built in 1622 it is one of the oldest buildings in Knaresborough.The cafe is very quaint with low ceilings and wooden beams. There is more seating upstairs.The food is typical English food. Hot or cold roast sandwiches, lasagne, omelettes, steaks and chicken.OPENING TIMES:-TUES - THURS 10.00 - 16.00FRI - SUN...

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  • DELICIOUS LATTE

    Verralls is a lovely coffee shop near the castle in Knaresborough. There is seating g for 70 people. The usual food served here is sandwiches, omelettes, fish, and general English food [bangers and mash, gammon etc.]They also have special events. February 2010 is the Spanish food festival, with a special menu featuring tapas, paella, Spanish wine...

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  • Pub food

    The pub is situated in the heart of Knaresborough. I visited it for a lunch time meal. There was a welcoming atmosphere & a good selection of pub food & beers.

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  • TRADITIONAL FISH AND CHIPS

    Drakes is a traditional fish and chip shop and fish restaurant.The fish was extremely tasty and the chips cooked to perfection.The cost of £6.40 included fish and chips with bread and butter and a cup of tea [or coffee] and this was well worth the price. THE HADDOCK WAS DELICIOUS

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  • CANTONESE CUISINE

    Monday, September 8, 2008After a full day of touring the countryside and sight-seeing, we ( Hans & I, Suet, Suvanki, Poons and Angiebabe) sure were getting hungry. We pulled into the lovely town of Knaresborough and spotted the RIVERVIEW Chinese Restaurant. So we went in, sat down and ordered our food. Hans had Sweet & Sour Chicken (7.60), I had...

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  • Drakes.

    This place is very popular, and always busy, so you can guess how good the fish and chips are served the english way with tea and bread and butter. If the restaurant is full there is also a takeaway shop.

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  • Fish and Chips not to be missed!

    A great restaurant that i have been going to since i was a child. It has a restaurant where you can sit and eat, and also a seperate take away.I always enjoy whatever i choose on the menu. It a homely atmosphere with nice staff. You don't just to have fish and chips here, there is pie, nuggets, sausage etc. Children have their own selected menu....

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Knaresborough Transportation

  • Train to Knaresborough

    Knaresborough is served by Northern Rail and is on the Leeds to York via Harrogate line. If you get on a Knaresborough bound train in York the announcment will be that you are travelling on a Leeds bound train but if you get on in Leeds the announcement will be you are on a Poppleton bound train even though it is going to York. This is to ensure...

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  • Train

    As Knaresborough is situated on the railway line between Leeds & York, it's so easy to get there from both cities. I travelled from Leeds, during the daytime there are 2 trains an hour & the journey took 45 minutes. Coming by train from Leeds also means that on entering Knaresborough you get to cross the magnificent viaduct.The website below will...

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  • Trains

    From Leeds or York (both mainline stations), get the train to Knaresborough. It is usually the Harrogate train, but double check especially late at night or early in the morning, as they don't always go all the way!

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Knaresborough Local Customs

  • St. John's Church

    dates from the NOrman period onwards and the Slingsby family tombs are a special feature. The church bells were used to guide traders to Knaresborough on Market Day. This bell ringing on Tuesday nights still keeps the tradition alive.

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  • Our Lady of the Crag

    A tiny 12 by 8 ft chapel and only 7 ft high, carved out of the rock face near Low Bridge. It is though to be the third oldest wayside shrine in England dating from 1408.St. Robert of Knaresborough lived like a hermit beside the river. 800 yrs ago, kings, bishops and commoners came to speak with this holy man. It is now an important place of...

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  • Knaresborough Hotels

    6 Hotels in Knaresborough

    163 Reviews and Opinions

Knaresborough Warnings and Dangers

  • CatherineReichardt's Profile Photo

    by CatherineReichardt Written Oct 17, 2011

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    Visiting churches is one of the absolute highlights of a trip to Europe, and provides a fascinating insight into the culture which has shaped European cultures of the past couple of millenia.

    Unlike some other religions - where access to places of worship may be restricted to members of that religious group or a specific gender - the vast majority of Christian churches will allow tourists to visit at most times, including routine services (although some may charge an admission fee for doing so, and access may be denied for private events such as weddings and funerals). However, tourists need to bear in mind that most churches are still active places of worship, and so visitors need to exhibit a certain sensitivity to display respect to the culture and avoid giving offence to people at prayer.

    The following guidelines are based on wonderful advice offered by Homer (homaned) - who does this for a living - in a forum response, and although specifically written for Christian places of worship, would apply equally to places of worship for other religions

    So, here is a general list of do's and don'ts for people wishing to photograph during a church service:

    READ THE SIGNS
    If photography is not permitted - because, for example, it may damage paint on delicate murals - this will usually be indicated by a pictogram of a camera with a red line through it. Under most circumstances, you can assume that photography will be allowed (unless otherwise indicated), but may not be permitted during services. If in doubt, ask for clarification - this shows respect and will very seldom be met with anything other than a helpful response.

    TURN OFF YOUR FLASH!
    Every camera on the market has a button on it which will turn off the flash. The number one most alarming and distracting thing that can happen during a liturgy, and one which will even get you kicked out of some churches, is the bright flash that goes off when you take a picture. Not only is it distracting, but it usually makes the picture turn out dark, because your camera's flash only has about a 10-15' range. Turn off the flash, and hold the camera up against your eye, using the viewfinder, and you will likely get a better picture (and you definitely won't have any red-eye problems!).

    DON'T MOVE AROUND ALL OVER THE PLACE! (UNLESS YOU HAVE PERMISSION)
    Instead of walking all over down the main aisle and in front of everybody, pick a good place from which to take a picture at the beginning of the liturgy, and stay there. Unless you're a professional photographer with practice at stealthily moving during liturgies, you're a distraction, and you're being disrespectful. Even if you're a pro, try to stick to one out-of-the-way place, and use a zoom lens and zoom in to get pictures. Walking in front of people is a surefire way to distract and disrespect and closing in on priests or other celebrants just to capitalise on a photo opportunity is offensive.

    TURN OFF THE CAMERA'S SOUND!
    Every camera has some way to mute all its 'cute' beeps and clicking noises. If you press a button, and hear a beep, or if you take a picture and hear an obnoxious shutter clicking sound, you need to turn off those sounds (the muting option is usually in one of the menus). Along with the flashing, it's an obvious sign that someone is taking pictures and not showing much respect for those trying to pay attention to the liturgy.

    TURN OFF the 'focus assist' light!
    If your camera can't focus without the little laser-light that shines in everyone's eyes before your camera takes a picture, then don't use your camera. You have to turn that light off! It is very distracting to be watching a lector or priest, and see a little red dot or lines pop up on his face all of the sudden. It's as if some rifleman is making his mark! Turn the light off (again, look in the menus for the option to turn off the 'AF assist' or 'focus assist' light). If you can't turn it off, put a piece of duct tape or some other opaque material over the area where the light is, so the light won't shine on someone.

    TURN OFF THE CAMERA'S LCD!
    You should never use the LCD to compose your shots anyways; just put your eye up to the viewfinder, and that will not only not distract, it will also steady your camera against your face, making for a better picture (especially if you don't have the flash on). And if you must review the pictures you've taken, hold the camera in front of you, down low, so people behind you don't notice the big, bright LCD display on your camera

    CERTAIN PARTS OF THE CEREMONY ARE PARTICULARLY SENSITIVE
    Photographing the blessing of the eucharist (bread and wine) and distribution of communion to the congregation are considered to be particularly sacred parts of the service, and it is offensive to photograph these activities.

    The main thing is to try to be respectful of the culture and of other people present at the service. Don't distract. And, if you are asked to not take pictures, or if there's a sign saying 'no photography allowed,' then don't take pictures. You can always ask a priest's permission before the liturgy, but if he says 'No,' put away your camera and enjoy the freedom you have to focus on the privilege of being able to share an experience with people who consider these religious rituals core to their culture and identity, rather than focusing on your camera's LCD!

    Homer's Rules ... Homer rules!

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Knaresborough Tourist Traps

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    by Sjalen Written Sep 1, 2003

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    Mother Shipton is a legend in Yorkshire. It is clear that a woman with that name has lived in Yorkshire although it could also have been in York. No one is sure if it is in the 15th or 17th century either as she is mentioned in both. What IS clear, however, is that this lady was telling prophesies, although those too have been showed to be fraud :-) If she lived near the Dropping Well or not, I don't care. Today, the well is Knaresborough's most well known sight on its own merits. People come to it to put objects under the water flow and see how they calcify - a process which of course was seen as very mysterious before science could explain it. On a good summer day, it can get very crowded.

    Unique Suggestions: Bring a teddy bear (not your childhood favourite!) and put it under the water, then study all other bears before it. They don't look like they did in the shop that's for sure!

    Fun Alternatives: Stroll around the scenic town.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Adventure Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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Knaresborough Favorites

  • HISTORIC KNARESBOROUGH

    Monday, September 8, 2008After a full day of sight-seeing in the Yorkshire Dales, we ( Hans and I, Sue (Suet), June (Poons), Angie (Angiebabe) and Sue (Suvanki), were getting hungry. We stopped in the lovely town of Knaresborough and found a Chinese Restaurant, where we all had a bite to eat.KNARESBOROUGH is in North Yorkshire, 16 miles from...

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  • Public house.

    The pub with the prophetic title. This pub is situated on the river side near Harrogate to Knaresborough road bridge. Over the bridge is The Yorkshire Lass pub.

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  • Stroll-friendly town

    I just love hopping off the bus at the Market Place and then walk downhill to the river via lots of wonderful cottages I wish I owned, like this one at Waterbag Bank - so called as it was from here water was carried up hill to town.

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Explore Deeper into Knaresborough
Knaresborough Castle
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Castle grounds
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Viaduct
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Rowing boats
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The Oldest Chemist Shop
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Mother Shiptons Cave
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The Court House Museum
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Castle
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Walk along the riverside.
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Castle ruin.
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Knaresborough Castle
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Mother Shipton's Cave
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Ripley Castle
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Rowing on the river
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