Whitby Things to Do

  • Steam train pulling into Whitby Station
    Steam train pulling into Whitby Station
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  • A4 Pacific
    A4 Pacific "Sir Nigel Gresley" at...
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  • Looking up towards the Lighthouse (2011/12)
    Looking up towards the Lighthouse...
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Most Recent Things to Do in Whitby

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    Caedmon's Cross

    by Myfanwe Written Aug 23, 2011

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    Caedmon's Cross
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    At the top of the steps leading to the Church and Abbey you will find a great Celtic Cross. This is Caedmon's Cross which is a 19th Century Memorial dedicated to Caedmon, the earliest known English poet. It's worth taking a closer look as it contains some great carvings with intricate detail.

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    Bag yourself some Kippers

    by Myfanwe Updated Aug 23, 2011

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    Fortunes Kippers
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    Fortunes Smokehouse and shop is THE place to buy the most fantastic smoked fish. Established in 1872 by William Fortune, they have been smoking kippers for over 139 years and are the only traditional smokehouse in Whitby. It is situated just a few hundred yards away from the foot of the steps leading to the Abbey. The shop is a small understated affair with rows of freshly smoked kippers on display. We decided to take some home for our tea & it has got to be said it really was the nicest fish I have ever tasted - I want to go back NOW and buy some more :-))

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    St Mary's Church

    by Myfanwe Written Aug 23, 2011

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    St Mary's Church
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    The Parish Church of St Mary has been altered many times during its' 900 year history. Although inside you will find the Georgian style galleries, box pews and triple decker pulpit have remained intact. It is quite different to many of the Churches I have seen. The church also has an Elizabethan altar table, memorial plaques, coat of arms and wall paintings for you to admire.

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    Visit St Hilda's Abbey

    by Myfanwe Written Aug 23, 2011

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    Whitby Abbey
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    The remains of Whitby Abbey sit high up on the East Cliff, the silhouette of this grand building can be seen from miles around.

    The first Abbey was founded on this site in 657 AD by the Anglo Saxons. Lady Hilda of Hartlepool Abbey was appointed as founding Abbess. Following the demise of this Abbey, a soldier belonging to William the Conqueror created the Benedictine Abbey which was to remain until it was destroyed by Henry VIII in 1540 during the Dissolution of the Monasteries. The abbey buildings fell into ruins, and were mined for stone, but remained a prominent landmark for sailors and became famous for helping to provide inspiration for Bram Stoker's Dracula.

    This beautiful ruined Abbey is now in the care of English heritage. Opening times and up to date pricing information can by found by clicking on the website below.

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    Whale Bones

    by Balam Updated Aug 17, 2011

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    For 80 years 1753-1833 The fishermen of Whitby were engaged in whaling. A total of 58 ships sailed during this period making a total of 577 voyages with Seventeen ships being lost.
    A total of 2,761 Whales, 25,000 Seals and 55 Polar Bears were brought back.

    The whale jaw bone arch on the West Cliff was donated by Alaska in April 2003 although the original Whale jaw bone arch was erected sometime after 1853. (It is now displayed in the Whitby Archives & Heritage Centre) Various countries have donated Whale bones to stand here over the years.

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    Whitby Abbey

    by Balam Written Aug 11, 2011

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    Whitby Abbey
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    The first monastery at Whitby was founded in AD 657 by The Northumbrian King Oswy. It was an Anglo Saxon style monastery and was for men and women, It was on this site that Caedmon the cowherd was miraculously transformed into an inspired poet and here that the future of the English Church was decided in 664 by the Synod of Whitby so as you can imagine, It is a very special place although the fantastic Gothic ruins that you can see today belong to the church of the Benedictine abbey built by the Normans from about 1220 and it’s pinnacled east end and north transept still stand high although other parts of the church collapsed during storms and the west front was hit by German naval shelling in 1914.
    199 steps lead up to the Abbey from the town but it’s certainly worth it as it offers some great views over the town and coast. Although you can drive up (follow the signs)

    English Heritage Member Free
    Adult£6.00
    Child£3.60
    Concession£5.40
    Family Ticket£15.60

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    Visit the ruins of Whitby Abbey

    by uglyscot Updated Jun 11, 2011
    The abbey
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    The Abbey sits perched on a headland overlooking the town. It is enclosed within a stone wall. There are spacious car parks .
    The opening times vary throughout the year. In summer the site opens at 10am and closes at 6pm.
    Admission fees:
    Adults £6
    Concession £5.40
    Children £3.60
    A family ticket [2 adults and up to 3 children] £15.60
    Inside the visitor centre there are digital reconstructions of the Abbey, a craft shop, and various events are held from time to time.

    The first abbey, for both men and women was founded by King Oswy of Northumbria. Its first ruler was the Abbess Princess Hild.
    The existing ruins were built by the Normans about 1220. It has suffered collapse from storms and German naval attacks in 1914.

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  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Musicport- World Music Festival

    by suvanki Updated Mar 12, 2011

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    The annual Musicport Festival will be held 4th - 6th November 2011.
    It originated in Whitby in 2000, and is now recognised as the UKs biggest annual indoor world music festival. However, since 2008 the location has moved to nearby Bridlington - So I'll be adding details there later


    Check out the web page for ticket details (went on sale March 1st) and line - up - provisional acts at the moment, and waiting to announce head line acts.

    Also, check out past festival dates, for an idea of the types of music, and other events-film, cooking etc.

    Throughout the year, Musicport holds concerts and events in Whitby and Bridlington, and continues as a non-profit making organisation, promoting live music and music education through Whitby and the surrounding area.

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    Henrietta Street

    by suvanki Updated Mar 12, 2011

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    Henrietta Street, Whitby

    This street is lined with terraced cottages, most of which now appear to be holiday cottages. Also, on the right hand side is Fortunes Kipper shop and smokehouse (see my Fortunes tip)where kippers are cured over oak chippings

    This street is quite atmospheric, especially if no one else is about, as you can feel as if you've stepped back in time.

    The street dates back to at least the 16th century,when upto 130 houses were constructed along Haggerlythe Cliff.

    In 1787 and 1871, landslides resulted in destruction of the houses, with coffins from the cemetery above falling down the cliffside.

    The sandy beach below, is known as Collier Hope, as it once sheltered coal ships, that travelled regularly between Newcastle and London.

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  • Britannia2's Profile Photo

    Whitby Abbey

    by Britannia2 Updated Aug 13, 2010

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    Whitby Abbey
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    Whitby Abbey is a ruined Benedictine abbey sited on the East Cliff, 199 steps above Whitby harbour - you can drive up to the Abbey or walk up the 199 steps from the town on the East Cliff side. There is a large car park and access to the ruins from the car park is via a lift in the visitor centre so disabled access is good but the ground can be dificult for pushing wheelchairs.
    The abbey was destroyed by Henry VIII in 1540 during the Dissolution of the Monasteries. The abbey buildings fell into ruins, and were mined for stone, but remained a prominent landmark for sailors and helped inspire Bram Stoker's Dracula and the ruins are now owned and maintained by English Heritage.
    2010 prices are £5.80 for adults with children at £2.90. Concessions are £4.90.

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    Moors Centre, Danby

    by Britannia2 Updated Aug 13, 2010

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    Moors Centre

    Originally the Centre was Dawnay Lodge, a family home used by Sir John Dawnay, 1st Viscount Downe. Built of locally quarried sandstone, dressed in the traditional herringbone fashion, the building has recently been renovated internally and externally.

    John Dawnay, (later the first viscount – 1681) bought Danby Manor (23,000 acres) and in due course grouse shooting was developed over the common lands. In order to accommodate the family, their guests and servants of the shooting parties, Dawnay Lodge was substantially adapted and expanded and became known as Danby Lodge.
    The Lodge was transformed into The Moors Centre in 1976 by the North York Moors National Park. The popular Centre welcomes as many as 130,000 visitors a year as well as providing a base for 11,000 young people discovering more about this special area.
    About 7 miles from Whitby.

    Facilities include gifts, books and map shop, tea room, information centre, lecture theatre, school studies centre and offices. Car parking is available and there are many excellent and varied walks onto the moors, Danby Castle or along the River Esk.
    Many varied organised events at very reasonable prices - on the day we visited a guide was taking people out on an adder hunting afternoon.

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    Captain Cook Memorial Museum

    by Britannia2 Updated Aug 13, 2010

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    The museum is set in the house where a young James Cook came to serve his seamans apprenticeship. This fine looking building is now a museum that contains a collection of items such as letters written by Cook , original paintings, ship models and maps. There are also some of things on display that Cook brought back form his world travels.

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    Whitby Whalebones

    by Britannia2 Written Aug 13, 2010

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    These famous whale bones commemorate the whaling industry in the town from the 18th and 19th centuries.
    The original Whale jaw bone arch was erected some time after 1853 and is now displayed in the Whitby Archives and Heritage Centre. A replica was presented to Whitby by Norway in 1963. The current replacement was donated by Alaska in April 2003 - Miss Alaska from the beauty world came to Whitby in that month to make the donation.
    The bones have to be replaced every 30 years or so because of the elements taking their toll on the bones.

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    The Lighthouse

    by Britannia2 Written Aug 13, 2010

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    Base of the lighthouse
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    The old lighthouse can be found on the West Pier and it was built in 1831. It is built of the yellow/brown stone found in this area and is 83 feet high with a lantern on the top. The light is visible for 10 miles but only displays a green light when a boat is expected.
    Its demise as a real working lighthouse came in 1914 when the new West Pier light came in to use and this is still in use today.
    Today the Port of Whitby operate the lighthouse in the summer months and the view from the top is very good but it is a long climb to the top.
    Prices in 2010 are - adults £1.20 and children 70p.

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    100 year old swing bridge

    by joanj Written Nov 25, 2009

    The Whitby Swing Bridge is over 100 years old, and joins the east and west sides of Whitby.

    It was built in 1908 spanning 2 sections 75ft. Each section can be operated independently, swinging horizontally. It is manned 2 hrs either side of high water and vessels request an opening via VHF radio.

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Whitby Things to Do

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