Local traditions and culture in York

  • Pavel at ?Ebby Bla?
    Pavel at ?Ebby Bla?
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • A City Centre Map, York
    A City Centre Map, York
    by spidermiss
  • York Hogroast
    York Hogroast
    by leics

Most Viewed Local Customs in York

  • Goner's Profile Photo

    The Clergy & The Law

    by Goner Updated Apr 9, 2004

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    Our second day in York we hurried back to York Minster to see what we had missed at this amazing cathedral and low and behold, it was closed to the public because of the local barristers and clergymen were taking their yearly walk, in full regalia - powdered wigs and regal robes - down the street to York Minster for special services. This is a 400-year-old tradition. Now isn't that special. Well we thought so and took too many pictures. No one seemed to know why this march was made each year. We were disappointed that we couldn't see more of this awesome cathedral.

    The Procession

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    British Money

    by HORSCHECK Written Mar 12, 2005

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    Even though the United Kingdom is a member of the European Union (EU) since 1973, they don't have the EURO as currency. The currency of the United Kingdom is still the British Pound. 1 Pound is worth 100 Pence. You can get your money with your credit or debit card from ATMs or just by exchanging your local money at one of the bureaux de change.

    Five Pounds note
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  • londonlover's Profile Photo

    Ghost Tours Run Rampant in York

    by londonlover Written Jul 9, 2004

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    Like an ancient city, York has its share of ghost stories, but there must be at least 10 different guided "ghost" tours of York done each night. On the recommendation of our B&B hosts, we chose the Ghost Hunt, which is hosted by a theatrical but distinguished "Andy Dextrous." The stories are only half the fun, since the semi-interactive storytelling in atmospheric city streets is the real highlight.

    Setting the stage for ghoulish tales...

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Portable food from the Cornish Pasty Bakery.

    by leics Updated Dec 7, 2006

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    Pasties are pastry containers which hold, traditionally, a hot filling of beef, swede, potato and onion. They originated in Cornwall, but can now be found all over the country. They are brilliant for eating as you wander around, especially if it's a bit chilly!
    York has two excellent pasty shops.....one on Colliergate and one on Coney Street. They have a variety of pasties, in 3 sizes and with different fillings, as well as selling drinks, sandwiches, baguettes and panini. They're open till midnight on Friday and Saturday. Pasties from 99p.

    Super pasties.
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  • londonlover's Profile Photo

    Guided Walking Tour of Historic York

    by londonlover Written Jul 9, 2004

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    This sign is just outside Goodramgate, on the western side of the city, and this is the meeting point for a daily walking tour let by a local guide. It lasts for about two hours, and depending on the guide, will give you various insights into modern and historic life in York, its customs, background, and architecture. A very nice introduction to the city.

    Click for a close-up of the important info

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  • Fire Hazard

    by sabsi Updated May 13, 2003

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    At least four times in its history York minster was party destroyed by fire. In 1984 there was another fire - caused by lightning - which destroyed the south of the minster.

    Now when you light a candle in the cathedral you will find something very unusual: Fire Blankets!!

    Fire Blankets!

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  • DAO's Profile Photo

    THE BIG ISSUE !

    by DAO Updated Jan 24, 2007

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    Sometimes they get lost in the crowd. Other times they are very noticeable. Sometimes you just hear them shouting “BIG ISSUE”! The Big Issue is a magazine with a difference. It is sold by people who are homeless or just barely housed. They have been through it all, usually an addiction. Now, they want to make a life for themselves. Big Issue sellers are clean and they must buy the magazine they sell. They sell it to you and they keep the mark-up profit for themselves. They are independent business people now trying to make their own lives better. They run a business and are not asking for handouts.

    The inspiration for the Big Issue magazine came from ‘Street News’, a newspaper sold by homeless people in New York City. Gordon Roddick of The Body Shop saw this in action during a visit and wanted to brink the concept to the UK. He and Mr. A. John Bird launched The Big Issue in London in September 1991. Originally it was a monthly publication.

    It proved a success and went weekly in June 1993. It spread to other cities with Regional titles:
    Manchester (The Big Issue in the North)
    Glasgow (The Big Issue Scotland)
    Cardiff (The Big Issue Cymru)
    Bristol (The Big Issue South West)
    Birmingham (The Big Issue Midlands).

    It has also gone international in places like Sydney, Cape Town and Los Angeles.

    Before you think the magazine is boring, buy a copy. It has news, music, sports, art reviews and more. Just to keep it in perspective it also has a ‘missing’ section. Not a handout but a hand up. Buy one and have a read. You may find yourself becoming a frequent reader.

    The Big Issue is based at:
    1-5 Wandsworth Road, London SW8 2LN

    SOMETIMES LOST IN THE CROWD
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  • ATLC's Profile Photo

    Recipe: Yorkshire Parkin

    by ATLC Updated Sep 21, 2002

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    Oats grow better than wheat in the north of England. and oatmeal is an essential part of parkin, the traditional northern form of gingerbread. This is a modern, lighter recipe, which includes more wheat flour.
    ----
    225g self-raising flour
    225g oatmeal
    225g margarine
    225g light soft brown sugar
    110g treacle
    110g golden syrup
    150 ml milk
    2 eggs
    4tsp ginger.
    ----
    Mix dry ingredients. Melt margarine, sugar, treacle and syrup together, then mix into dry ingredients. Beat eggs with milk and beat in.
    Pour into greased and lined 25x18 cm tin. Bake for 1 hr at 170 degr. Celsius. It will still be soft and will sink in the center. Do not overbake. Keep 2-3 days before eating.

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  • ATLC's Profile Photo

    Recipe: Yorkshire teacakes

    by ATLC Written Sep 21, 2002

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    500g strong flour
    45g sugar
    40g lard or butter
    110g currants
    140ml cold milk
    140ml boiling water
    2 tsp instant dried yeast
    1 tsp salt
    ---
    Mix flour, sugar, currants, yeast and salt. Pour water over fat and allow to melt, then mix in milk. Add to dry ingredients and mix well. Cover with damp cloth and leave to rise in a warm placce for about an hour, until doubled in size. Knead lightly, divide into six and shape into flattened rounds. Place on a greased baking tray and cover with a damp cloth. Leave to prove for another hour, or until doubled in size. Bake for 10-15 min. at 220 degr. celsius.

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  • ATLC's Profile Photo

    Recipe: Yorkshire apple pudding

    by ATLC Written Sep 21, 2002

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    120g self-raising flour
    1 beaten egg
    300 ml. milk
    1 sharp apple
    50g lard or 2tbs vegetable oil
    ---
    Put flour in bowl. Make well in centre and put in egg. Start beating, bringing in flour gradually, then slowly add milk. Peel and core apple, then grate into batter, and stir. Put fat into a 25x18 cm baking tray and place in a preheated oven at 220 degrees Celsius. When fat is hot, pour in batter quickly. Bake for 25-30 min. until browned and cooked through. Serve sprinkled with caster sugar, or with honey or golden syrup.

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Street performances and buskers.

    by leics Updated Nov 21, 2011

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    I've seen some brilliant buskers and street performances in York, musical and otherwise.

    There's always someone, somewhere doing something.....the yellow statue man (who has a tendency to unexpectedly chase unsuspecting females, just to make them squeal), the windy man (no, not that sort of wind), flautists, violinists, drummers, dancers, escapologists, magicians, singing dogs and local bands of all types.

    It really adds atmosphere to the place, and there is never any hassle about giving money.

    This year (2011), on a grim November Sunday, I very much enjoyed the man with the glass balls. He was very skilled indeed.

    South American musicians Driffield Silver Band (obviously)
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  • DAO's Profile Photo

    THE KIDS ARE BREAKING UP! BRIT LIFE ©

    by DAO Updated Jul 18, 2008

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    ”The children break up on Friday” Truly chilling words. Will their tiny arms and legs suddenly fall off? Will they become decapitated suddenly? All of them? This tip has been written on 18 July 2008. They day the kids break-up in England. Before you become very scared or are afraid you will see little body parts littering the roads in school uniforms – it’s OK. Really. ‘Breaking up’ is a British expression meaning the schools are closing for the summer holidays or other breaks during the year and the children are off school for a while. The first time I heard it I could only imagine complete carnage.

    BRIT LIFE ©

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Hog roasts.

    by leics Updated Nov 21, 2011

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    In the distant past, meat was roasted by turning it on a spit over an open fire. That doesn't happen in ordinary houses now, but the idea of hot roasted meat placed between two pieces of bread, with added sauces, is still very popular. Often called 'hog roasts', these shops (or mobile catering vans) usually provide a choice of hot pork, beef or poultry (sometimes lamb too) with various added extras.

    I like my 'hog' with added apple sauce, stuffing (sage and onion is traditional) and crackoling (the crispy roasted skin of the beast).

    One of the best in York is 'Dave's' on Goodramgate......the portions are huge and extremely tasty.

    I first wrote this tip in 2004 (crikey...how time flies!). 'Dave's is now called 'York Hogroast' but it's the same place, with he same huge portions. Still a really excellent, and very reasonably-priced way of 'filling a gap'. Especially on a chilly, gloomy November Sunday! :-)

    They've got another branch at 4 Stonegate.

    York Hogroast And it's not just 'hog'...
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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Police on bikes.

    by leics Updated Jun 3, 2004

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    Because York still has its Medieval street pattern, it's difficult for emergency vehicles to get through the crowded areas quickly. so there are police on mountain bikes, and paramedics too. They are exceptionally speedy...... the one in the picture was pedalling hell-for-leather back into town so we only caught the back of him as he whizzed by.

    Biking policeman.
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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    First Point of Call!

    by spidermiss Updated Sep 17, 2011

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    Visit York Tourist Information Centre is a useful calling point for visitors to York. The official tourist information centre can help visitors with tourist attractions, securing accommodation and directions. The centre stocks resources including flyers, maps and general information. Souvenirs are also for sale.

    The Tourist Information Centre is located at:
    1 Museum Street
    York
    YO1 7DT

    York Tourist Information Centre A City Centre Map, York

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