All Saints', York

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  • All Saints'
    by balhannah
  • Inside All Saint's Pavement Church
    Inside All Saint's Pavement Church
    by balhannah
  • Lectern
    Lectern
    by balhannah
  • ettiewyn's Profile Photo

    All Saints Pavement - coats of arms

    by ettiewyn Written Dec 1, 2012

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    As said in the previous tip, All Saints Pavement is the Guid Church of York, and therefore the coats of arms of the different guilts are on display at one wall inside. I thought it was much fun to have a look at them, although I did not know all the words.

    In my picture you can see:

    1. the guild of cordwainers - a cordwainer is a shoemaker, but making very fine leather shoes, so it is a different profession than a cobbler
    2. the guild of merchant tailors, first mentioned in 1387. The coat of arms is supported by two camels, and the motto displayed is Concordia Parvae Res Crescunt, which means (with harmony small things flourish)
    3. the guild of merchant adventurers

    I find these coat of arms and the histories of the guilds very interesting, they have such long traditions and still exist today!

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    All Saints Pavement

    by ettiewyn Written Dec 1, 2012

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    All Saints Pavement is a church right in the city centre, and maybe the most prominent one apart from the Minster. The interior of this church is well worth a visit, as there are many interesting features to see.

    The church was built in the 14th century on the site of an even earlier church. That earlier church was mentioned in the Domesday Book. The present church got its name because it was built in one of the earliest paved streets of York. It is important for several reasons: It is the guild church for the guilds of the city, and it is also a regimental church. Moreover, thirty-four Lord Mayors were buried here.
    The tower is a lantern tower and in earlier times, a light was burning there all night to guide travellers to York.
    Some parts of the church were demolished in the 19th century to make way for the Pavement Market Square, so before that, the church was a bit larger.

    The interior is not very luxurious, but rather simple in style. One of the most interesting things to see is the Anglo-Saxon grave cover - it was created in the 10th century and is taken as prove that there must have been a church at this spot at that time.
    Another piece to note is the brass knocker on the northern door. It is a replica of a brass knocker from the 13th century, and it depicts the "Mouth of Hell". The original is kept in the Minster treasury.

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    ALL SAINT'S PAVEMENT CHURCH

    by balhannah Updated Jan 30, 2012

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    Lectern
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    All Saints, Pavement I was able to enter.

    A church has been on this site since before the Norman Conquest, but the present building is almost entirely 14th- 15th centuries.

    Quite interesting inside! It has some very nice window's, one of them the west window, made out of 15th century York glass with scenes from the life of Christ.
    I took a photo of the Lectern because of the unusual carving of a man with a floppy Hat and a lolling tongue! [photo 1]

    There is an octagonal roofed pulpit, the canopy put on so as to amplify and direct a preacher's voice to the congregation, whether it worked or not, I don't know! It dates to 1634......

    And on the North door, was a 12th century 'doom' knocker which represented the Mouth of Hell, what kind of Beast it was, I don't know that either!

    Moving along, and above the Vestry door is a pair of gloves and sword of the 7th Earl of Northumberland, who was executed in "The Pavement" in 1572, for leading a rebellion agianst Queen Elizabeth 1.
    There was plenty of interest to see, but I never did find the carved Wood Mouse, perhap's you will!

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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    All Saints The Pavement York

    by spidermiss Updated Mar 21, 2011

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    All Saints Church Pavement

    This church dates since the 1500 although traditional and archaelological sources suggest that this was built for St Cuthbert, a Durham Bishop, in 685 AD and that the site existed since the 1100s. The lantern tower and other features were added during the 15th Century with which the tower held a lamp to service as a beacon for the Forest of Galtres' travellers in the 19th Century. Nowadays, the lantern tower is served as war memorial.

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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    All Saints' Pavement

    by Tom_Fields Written Jan 26, 2006

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    All Saints' Pavement Church
    1 more image

    In addition to the famous Cathedral known as Yorkminster, York also has some beautiful parish churches. One of them is All Saints' Pavement. This is the Parish and Guild church of York, and the resting place of 39 Lord Mayors.

    Mentioned in the Domesday Book, this church has had many modifications over the centuries. During the Middle Ages, a lamp was hung at night in the tower to guide travellers.

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    The other church

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 27, 2005

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    The church stands partly in High Ousegate, but principally in the Pavement. It is a very ancient structure, and, according to Drake, is built on the ruins of Eboracum. The body of the church and part of the steeple exhibit a very antique appearance, but the edifice is chiefly remarkable for a more modern erection of exquisite Gothic workmanship on the old steeple. This tower is finished lantern-wise, and tradition says, that anciently a large lamp hung in it, which was lighted in the night time, as a mark for travellers to aim at, in their way to York, over the immense forest of Galtres. There is still the hook or pully on which the lamp hung in the steeple, and iron bars cross the windows, in which the glass might be fixed. This lantern, it is conjectured, was built in the fifteenth century, and there are here several old monuments cotemporary with the supposed erection of the tower. Part of the present burial ground was formerly used as a Herb and Fish market, but in 1782-3 the church yard was enlarged, and the chancel being then taken down, the ground on which it stood was applied to enlarge the market place. At the same time the whole fabric underwent a thorough repair.
    The shop on the right is Marks and Spencer, a not unfamiliar name to the shoppers of England.

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    All Saints Church

    by barryg23 Updated Mar 1, 2006

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    All Saints Church

    One of the oldest churches in York, All Saints, on Pavement, was mentioned in the Domesday Book, as far back as 1086.

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    All Saint's Curch

    by Carmela71 Updated Jun 12, 2003

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    thanks to Stevenstilly, he corrected me, as I had confused this church.

    This is All Saint's Curch

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