City - Miscellaneous, York

44 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • City - Miscellaneous
    by balhannah
  • City - Miscellaneous
    by balhannah
  • City - Miscellaneous
    by balhannah
  • ettiewyn's Profile Photo

    Holy Trinity Church

    by ettiewyn Updated Dec 13, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    I had first heard about Holy Trinity Church right here on VT and really wanted to see it, and it did not disappoint me. It is a wonderful, cute little church in a beautiful setting, and absolutely worth a visit. Moreover, there are some very interesting and ancient features to see in this church.

    The present church was built in the 13th century and partly rebuilt in the 15th century. There was already a church at this spot in the 11th century, though, and some evidence of that one is still present today. Holy Trinity is grade I listed, and apart from some small changes made in the 19th century there have been no further changes.
    It is beautifully located in a small churchyard that lies off Goodramgate. You enter through a small gate and feel like in a different world - suddenly it is so calm and it looks like a place in a rural, idyllic village. You cannot imagine that you just came from a very busy street in the middle of a bustling city! I really liked the architecture of the church, it just looks like a perfect English church.

    In my photos you can see some of the most interesting features you can see inside.
    Picture 1 shows the box pews from the 17th century. Not many pews like these are left across the UK because usually they were removed in the 19th century, but in this church they survived. Each of the boxes was rented annually to a family.
    Picture 4 shows a carved grave slab from the 13th century. There is floriate cross carved into the stone, as well as a fish and a cauldron. These indicate the profession of the person who passed away, so probably it was a fish monger or dealer.
    Picture 5 shows a Hagioscope, something I had never heard about before! It is an angled window in the wall of the small side chapel that allows the chantry priest to look at the "main" priest at the high altar and synchronise his actions with him.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • ettiewyn's Profile Photo

    Statue of Constantine

    by ettiewyn Updated Dec 9, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    Close to the southern door of the Minster, there is a statue of Constantine the Great. He was proclaimed Emperor of Rome in 306A.D., right here in York! Of course the Minster was not there at that time, but at the very spot there were the headquarters of the Roman fortress and it is highly probable that the proclamation took place there.
    Constantine was the first Roman Emperor who became a Christian and therefore was utterly important to the course of European history.

    Three weeks after my visit to York I travelled to Milan and saw a statue of Constantine the Great in front of the church of San Lorenzo alle Colonne. Constantine stopped the prosecution of Christians through the Edict of Milan in 313A.D. Seeing two statues of the same person about 2000km away from each other made me realize how huge the Roman Empire actually was!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • ettiewyn's Profile Photo

    St Williams College

    by ettiewyn Updated Dec 8, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    St Williams College is a beautiful half-timbered building located close to the Minster. It was shown to me during our VT meeting and I thought it strikingly beautiful at once, especially when the sun was shining and the white looked so bright.

    The house was built in 1461 and it was a school for the young men educated at the Minster to become priests. It was named after St William, a nephew of King Stephen and maybe a descendent of William the Conquerer. During the 16th and 17th century it was altered a lot and was used as simple tenements. In the Civil War, it was used by King Charles I as home for his printing presses. Today, it can be hired for venues and is also home to a restaurant.

    You are free to walk into the inner courtyard and admire the fantastic framework!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    YORK AT NIGHT

    by balhannah Written Jan 31, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    If you have a chance, visit York at night.
    Thanks to Colin [Brittania2] and Maureen, who took us around and showed us the City lit up at night.
    It was lovely, especially the Minster, worth doing if you can!

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    BOER WAR MEMORIAL

    by balhannah Written Jan 31, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    This is a very nice Memorial that I came across near York Minster. Built in Gothic revival style, it's octagonal and really ornate! It honour's all the York men who died in second Boer War (1899-1902). 500,000 British troops faced a force of 88,000 from the two Boer republics, resulting in the most costly war's the British have been involved in!

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Backpacking
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    ST. JOHN'S UNIVERSITY

    by balhannah Updated Jan 31, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    St. John's University was another historic building that I found attractive. The building's were set amongst lovely green lawn's and shrubbery, what a nice setting for a University!

    The university descends from two Anglican teacher training colleges, which merged in 1974 to form the College of Ripon and York St John.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THE OLD WHITE SWAN

    by balhannah Written Jan 31, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    The Old White Swan is Pub
    It is a collection of around nine buildings and dates back to the 16th century which will place the pub along with the Black Swan, Punchbowl, and Ye Olde Starre Inne as one of York’s oldest.

    Historically, it's quite an interesting Pub. In the back courtyard, there still are timber framed medieval building's, but look for the stone rock that was used as 'mountings' to help people board the stagecoaches of yesteryear and contain four steps.

    One of its' most famous guest's was a 'Mr O'Brian' who was eight foot tall who visited on the 5th of August 1781 by permission of the Lord Mayor.
    The landlord at the time charging a shilling to see the visitor. Poor man!

    As with many Old pub's around York, it has a tale or two to tell.
    It is thought that the pub was a secret meeting place for papists who planned to flee to France. Ghostly figures have been seen huddled around the fire in the early morning, but the fire was left unlit, how had the fire been relit, the Staff said they didn't do it?
    Also there are tales of furniture being flung around by themselves and muffled voices and footsteps.

    Is it true! Is is haunted! I wonder!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    LADY ROW COTTAGE'S

    by balhannah Written Jan 31, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Lady Row
    1 more image

    This row of joined together Cottage's are known as "Lady Row."

    They date from 1316 and are the earliest row of houses surviving in the city.

    The houses are very simple, made of plastered timber framing with roofs of curved tiles.
    The original row was 128 feet long and only 18 feet deep, and had two storeys and eleven bays. Each bay formed a single home with one room on each floor, but at least one tenement occupied two bays. They were built as a home for the poorer people of York.

    Seven of the bays remain largely intact today, others have been replaced by taller brick buildings. In 1827 there was a proposal to re-open the whole churchyard to the street by pulling down Lady Row altogether, thankgoodness this threat was never realized!

    I found these on Goodramgate street. They nearly hide the view of the Holy Trinity Church, and there is a reason for this. The houses were built in the original churchyard and their rental income was used towards the church's running expenses.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    PETERGATE

    by balhannah Written Jan 31, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Petergate was the main cross road of York.
    I noticed a statue sitting on top of the "Shared Earth" shop. It was the statue of Minerva, Goddess of Wisdom, sitting with an owl and a pile of books, a reminder of the days when this was the street of bookbinders and booksellers.
    This point is also the main road intersection of Roman York and the entrance to the Roman military headquarters.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    YORK ART GALLERY

    by balhannah Updated Jan 31, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Art Gallery

    The York Art Gallery opened its doors to the public in 1879, then in 1892 became the City Art Gallery.

    The gallery looks out over Exhibition Square, also created in 1879, and to the city walls and York Minster. The centrepiece of the square is a statue of York artist William Etty which was erected in 1911 and a fountain.
    The Art gallery display's paintings and ceramics and holds exhibition's that change every few month's.
    Paintings are displayed in six areas over the two floors of the gallery and are divided into themes such as people and places.

    OPEN... daily from 10am until 5pm, except 25 and 26 December and 1 January.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    ST. MICHAEL LE BELFRY

    by balhannah Updated Jan 31, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    A lovely old style car sat out of the front of the church waiting for the Bride & Groom to emerge from the historic Church. What a day, cold and wet, but at least the rain had stopped for a moment!

    This is another Church located close to the Minster. The Angilican church was built in the time when King Henry VIII broke with Rome. It has Tudor architecture and contains 14th to 16th century glass. The facade is mainly Victorian style.

    The church is famous for being the place where Guy Fawkes was christened on 16 April
    1570
    Guy Fawkes was christened an Anglican in this Church, but later converted to Catholicism which led to the failed 1605 Gunpowder Plot.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THE THREE LEGGED MARE

    by balhannah Written Jan 31, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The name got us in! It is a York Brewery!

    Cask Beer and nine real ales on offer at any one time, it was a good chance to try some English Beer. Not only English, but they serve Beer from countries around the world.

    This is an independent Brewery that does a Brewery tour which includes beer sampling and a memento of your visit from a range of merchandise available from the brewery shop.

    TOUR....Adults £6.00....Senior Citizen £5.00....14-17 years £3.00
    Children 13 year olds and under go free

    Tour Times
    Monday-Saturday all year..12:30pm 2:00pm 3:30pm 5:00pm
    Sundays from May to September....12:30pm 2:00pm 3:30pm 5:00pm

    Related to:
    • Beer Tasting

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    ST. WILFRID'S CHURCH

    by balhannah Written Jan 31, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    St. Wilfrid's is a Roman Catholic church built in Gothic Revival style, and is located near York Minster. The Arch over the main door is stunning! It has the most detailed Victorian carving in the city.
    This isn't the original Church that was built in 1585, that one was demolished.

    The present Church was completed in 1864, and is rich in sculptures, paintings and stained glass. Since 1998, the current parish priest of St. Wilfrid's is the Very Reverend Canon Michael Ryan.

    Mass is celebrated here regularly every Saturday at 10.00am and it is open to visitors during the week.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Backpacking
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    ST. WILLIAM'S COLLEGE

    by balhannah Updated Jan 31, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St William's College was a pretty half-timbered and stone building, built in the 15th century.
    The building was built in 1453 for the Minster Chantry priests and St Williams College was founded 1461. Charles 1st had the Royal Mint and printing press here in the Civil War. It is now used as a meeting place for various events.
    Over the centuries the building has been used as lodging and a private house.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    STATUE OF CONSTANTINE

    by balhannah Written Jan 30, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Constantine

    Constantine, born in 272A.D to Constantius and Helena.
    I saw this big bronze statue of the Roman Emperor, sitting down and looking down on his broken sword, beside the York Minster, not far from what was the site of the Roman Legionary fortress.

    Helena was a devout Christian, promoting the faith in her charity work and for taking part in pilgrimages to the Holy Land. For this she was eventually proclaimed a Saint, and is remembered in York England by having St Helen's church.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: York

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

93 travelers online now

Comments

View all York hotels