City - Miscellaneous, York

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  • City - Miscellaneous
    by balhannah
  • City - Miscellaneous
    by balhannah
  • City - Miscellaneous
    by balhannah
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    TUDOR BUILDING

    by balhannah Written Jan 30, 2012

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    Want a Pizza in a 15th or early 16th century building, well, here in York you can at 48 GoodRamgate Street!

    This late 1500 Tudor building is rather interesting, as compared to others, it has downward curving timber brace's arranged in pair's which is rather unusual! It was a height of three storeys, but now the second floor is an open roof, so there are no attic's anymore.
    It is now a popular Italian restaurant.

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    RED HOUSE ANTIQUE CENTRE

    by balhannah Updated Jan 30, 2012

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    Red House Antique Centre

    I like looking at Antique's, so the Red House Antique shop was an interesting shop for me to visit.
    The shop had a good variety, and I found it very interesting viewing different item's for sale to my home Country.
    Even the building it was located in was antique! A Victorian home of stone and brick, two storeys with attics and cellars built in the early 18th century for the Lord Mayor in 1700 and MP for York from 1697 to 1722.

    If you enjoy antique's, there are quite a few shop's in York

    Open Mon - Friday 9.30 - 5.30 pm
    Saturday 9.30 - 6pm
    Sunday 10.30 - 5pm

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    • Women's Travel

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    GERT & HENRY'S

    by balhannah Updated Jan 30, 2012

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    Gert & Henry

    Gert & Henry's is the name of a Restaurant that is near the Market. The building is an old Tudor House, built in 1600 and restored for use as a Restaurant in 1929. It is a two-storey, gabled and timber-framed medieval building with attic's. At one time, this house used to house 6 families!
    Not anymore, now a Restaurant, and has been for a long time.
    It is on the York conservation Trust.

    Jubbergate, where it's located, was the street of the British in the Jewish quarter.

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    Hidden, but prominent

    by iandsmith Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Possibly the finest facade in all York

    Classified as York's "hidden gem", the Mansion House is a standout when you're going past St. Helen's Square.
    It's still the official residence of York's Lord Mayors and the colourful Palladian facade hides and impressive collection of civic silver, paintings and furniture unequalled by any provincial city in the country.

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    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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    The little Admiral and St. Martin Le Grand

    by Airpunk Written Sep 3, 2010
    St. Martin Le Grand and the Clock
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    In 1942, the city of York was bombed by German aircraft. Although York was not damaged as badly as Coventry or as some part of London, many people died and the Church of St. Martin Le Grand was destroyed. The church ruin is a place of remembrance, a monument in honour of the victims and against war. It was once a beautiful medieval church which was built in the 11th century. It was rebuilt during the centuries and developed a late gothic appearance. A small restored part of the church, re-hallowed in 1968, contains the original medieval stained glass windows which were preserved prior to the bombings. For details on the stained glass windows, please visit the page below.

    The best known mark of this church is its huge clock. The clock itself is a reconstruction of the original 17th century clock built between 1965 and 1966. The original one was heavily damaged during WWII. However, the little figure on the top survived the war. It is called “the little Admiral” and was part of the church since the 18th century. As it survived the air raid, this lovely little man became a much-adored symbol for York’s will to withstand the German attacks.

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    St. Michaels Le Belfry

    by Airpunk Updated Sep 3, 2010

    It is hard to imagine that a church standing right next to the Minster could attracts some sizeable amount of tourists. This one, however, is an exception. It is not only a beautiful example of late gothic architecture, but also the church in which Guy Fawkes (the guy with the gunpowder plot) was christened. It is located close to the Guy Fawkes Inn which was where he was born.

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    Half-timbered buildings

    by Airpunk Written Aug 31, 2010
    This one stands right behind the Minster
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    Although The Shambles is the most famous street for medieval buildings, also College Street and Goodmramgate have some beautiful half-timbered buildings. Beside St. William’s College, the most interesting one is the building right at the corner fo these two streets.

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    King’s Square

    by Airpunk Updated Aug 30, 2010
    Remains of the former graveyars
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    King’s Square is a triangular square, partly built on the spot of a former cemetery. On an elevated piece at the southeastern side of the square, you can still see some of the former tombstones. It was the cemetery of the former Christ Church which was demolished together with its graveyard in 1937. If you love street artists, buskers and similar forms of entertainment, this is the place to go. I even saw some people doing some morris dancing. It was when I was part of a ghost walk and the tour leader presented it to us as something frightening, not suitable for children....

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    Monument to Emperor Constantine

    by Airpunk Updated Aug 30, 2010
    Monument to Emperor Constantine

    Constantine the Great was proclaimed Emperor while he was in York. Although he was proclaimed Augustus (chief emperor) in 304, he only accepted the title of Caesar (emperor) and gained full power in 324. It was not until 306 when Constantine entered office.
    The monument is placed close to the spot where he was proclaimed emperor. Its commemorative plaque honours him for the role he played in spreading Christianity in the western world. However, his real attitude to Christianity is still doubted. Constantine’s monument was presented by the York civic trust and unveiled on July 25th 1998. Today, the monument is probably the best known tribute to York’s Roman past, although many ruins and exhibits are also open for visitors. For more Roman York and Emperor Constantine, visit the Minster and pay special attention to the ruins of the Roman Fortress in the undercroft.

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    • Archeology

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    Constantine the Great

    by joanj Updated Nov 23, 2009

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    Bronze of Constantine the Great
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    Outside and to the left of the steps leading out of York Minster, there is a bronze statue of Constantine the Great.

    A Plaque on the side reads :- Near this place Constantine the Great was proclaimed Roman Emporer in 306. His recognition of the Civil liberties of his Christian subjects, and his own conversion to the Faith, established the religious foundations of the Western World

    The statue was provided by the York Civic Trust and unveiled by the Rt. Revd. and Rt . Hon. Lord Coggan D.D. Former Archbishop of York and of Canterbury on the 25th July 1998..

    He was born around 272AD and died May 22nd 337.

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  • February break, Jorvik viking festival, York, Eng.

    by JoltingJoe Updated Jan 8, 2009

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    Vikingra!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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    Jorvik viking festival is a long established annual event that has appeal for all the family! There is a programme of events for you to follow most of them are free, but you can pay to participate in some very good events. I have been on the saga and song night which was excellent, the viking light spectacular with fire works display to finish. This year Im going on a coach tour to some churches ravaged by viking raids, which are on the outskirts of York and not usually easily accessible. If you are into the Vikings you can buy a range of jewellery or everyday objects, clothing, drinking and blowing horns, trinkets and leather drinking mugs. You can buy these goods at Barley Hall, the Jorvik centre or in Marquess in Sampson Square. On occassion they have talks by specialists talks by Archeologist at local seats of learning.
    Visit Jorvik viking festival web page for a programme Visit the museum gardens for a free battle show that will keep the whole family amused all morning. For refreshments I recommend a pot of tea and sandwich from a cafe next to the market, you can sit upstairs with a nice view. Find the Black Swan on Peasholme Green for a nice pint in a very old pub!

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  • Tips from a resident

    by fulford Written Apr 11, 2007

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    York is always busy with tourists, but they do not always find the best things to do.

    St Crux church in Whip-ma-whop-ma gate does the best cup of tea
    The best ghost tour starts from outside the Kings Arms pub
    The riverside pubs next to the City Screen cinema are great for a lunchtime meal when it is sunny (walk down the alley way towards the cinema from Coney Street)
    The art gallery is free, has excellent exhibitions and a good cafe
    Dick Turpin's grave can be visited in St Georges churchyard, George Street
    York is a great place to hire a bike because it is flat and has good cycle paths (for example along the river or along a disused railway line to Selby Abbey)
    If you are going to Jorvik either book in advance or go one hour before it closes to avoid the long queues

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    Oddities

    by iandsmith Updated Sep 1, 2006

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    Nice buildings, hold your nose

    Ogleforth is on the route route from Monk Bar to York Minster. The street is thought to be a Sacandinavian name which means the ford haunted by an owl. It may alternatively have belonged to someone called Ugel.
    As another alternative, according to Dave, it could have meant, as it was used at the time, as an open sewer.
    There are some Georgian buildings in the street. Should you wish to see some streets as they originally appeared you could do worse than check out the Castle Folk Museum where you can enjoy everything without having to worry about the weather. They even have a hansom cab travelling down a cobbled street for authenticity.

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    York Minster!

    by CheekyDee Written Jun 7, 2006

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    York Minster interior
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    York Minster is just a huge architectural work of art, to think how long it took to build with no modern machinery. Men toiling away with such detail and basic tools it's mind boggling to be honest! It's situated a short walk from the river and it's huge structure stands out in the horizon. The interior is just as stunning as the exterior, in some ways more so! Plenty of kodak moments in there, and moments of silence and awe as well. When you walk in there's such an atmosphere, hard to describe, but a mix of amazement, wonder, beauty, and sadness. Churches always make me a bit sad sometimes.

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    Street scenes

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 27, 2005

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    Sorry, I'm into zips
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    The first shot is of a shop I never expected. They sell buttons, which is just as well, because Duttons for Buttons has over 16,000 different types. You can mail order from them, well, their Harrogate store anyway. Amazing.
    The Lowther (2nd pic) is a pub serving a variety of beers, wines and spirits as well as traditional pub grub. They also act as a bed and breakfast and have three guest rooms equipped with a television, shower and tea and coffee making facilities. Parking is available.

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    • Family Travel

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