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    Holy Trinity Church

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 25, 2005

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    Follow me folks
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    If you're looking for a slightly different experience, this is a place I can recommend. If you've been overwhelmed by the overkill splendour of the Minster then this is about as opposite as it can get.
    Holy Trinity is located just off Goodramgate, in the north of old York. This quiet church is primarily 15th century but most of the exterior dates from the 17th and 18th centuries. The interior is simple (as shown in pic 2), verging on plain, but is notable for its irregular 17th century box pews, and some fine medieval stained glass.
    You might also note while inside a channel carved from the quoir to the altar. This is so the conductor could see and take his cue from the priest.
    The churchyard is a lovely oasis, where locals sit and eat their lunches in peace, just yards from busy shoppers in Goodramgate.

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    Statue of Constantine

    by ettiewyn Updated Dec 9, 2012

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    Close to the southern door of the Minster, there is a statue of Constantine the Great. He was proclaimed Emperor of Rome in 306A.D., right here in York! Of course the Minster was not there at that time, but at the very spot there were the headquarters of the Roman fortress and it is highly probable that the proclamation took place there.
    Constantine was the first Roman Emperor who became a Christian and therefore was utterly important to the course of European history.

    Three weeks after my visit to York I travelled to Milan and saw a statue of Constantine the Great in front of the church of San Lorenzo alle Colonne. Constantine stopped the prosecution of Christians through the Edict of Milan in 313A.D. Seeing two statues of the same person about 2000km away from each other made me realize how huge the Roman Empire actually was!

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    Hidden, but prominent

    by iandsmith Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Possibly the finest facade in all York

    Classified as York's "hidden gem", the Mansion House is a standout when you're going past St. Helen's Square.
    It's still the official residence of York's Lord Mayors and the colourful Palladian facade hides and impressive collection of civic silver, paintings and furniture unequalled by any provincial city in the country.

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    Oddities

    by iandsmith Updated Sep 1, 2006

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    Nice buildings, hold your nose

    Ogleforth is on the route route from Monk Bar to York Minster. The street is thought to be a Sacandinavian name which means the ford haunted by an owl. It may alternatively have belonged to someone called Ugel.
    As another alternative, according to Dave, it could have meant, as it was used at the time, as an open sewer.
    There are some Georgian buildings in the street. Should you wish to see some streets as they originally appeared you could do worse than check out the Castle Folk Museum where you can enjoy everything without having to worry about the weather. They even have a hansom cab travelling down a cobbled street for authenticity.

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    Holy Trinity Church

    by ettiewyn Updated Dec 13, 2012

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    I had first heard about Holy Trinity Church right here on VT and really wanted to see it, and it did not disappoint me. It is a wonderful, cute little church in a beautiful setting, and absolutely worth a visit. Moreover, there are some very interesting and ancient features to see in this church.

    The present church was built in the 13th century and partly rebuilt in the 15th century. There was already a church at this spot in the 11th century, though, and some evidence of that one is still present today. Holy Trinity is grade I listed, and apart from some small changes made in the 19th century there have been no further changes.
    It is beautifully located in a small churchyard that lies off Goodramgate. You enter through a small gate and feel like in a different world - suddenly it is so calm and it looks like a place in a rural, idyllic village. You cannot imagine that you just came from a very busy street in the middle of a bustling city! I really liked the architecture of the church, it just looks like a perfect English church.

    In my photos you can see some of the most interesting features you can see inside.
    Picture 1 shows the box pews from the 17th century. Not many pews like these are left across the UK because usually they were removed in the 19th century, but in this church they survived. Each of the boxes was rented annually to a family.
    Picture 4 shows a carved grave slab from the 13th century. There is floriate cross carved into the stone, as well as a fish and a cauldron. These indicate the profession of the person who passed away, so probably it was a fish monger or dealer.
    Picture 5 shows a Hagioscope, something I had never heard about before! It is an angled window in the wall of the small side chapel that allows the chantry priest to look at the "main" priest at the high altar and synchronise his actions with him.

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    The Romans have landed

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 26, 2005

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    Self explanatory really

    Yes, well we know all that. Around the city on your tour you will see references to the Roman presence on plaques such as you see here.
    At times you have to use your imagination more than a little with the original Roman street now almost overpowered and swamped by "modern" architecture but, at other times some of the presence is clear to see.
    What's not immediately clear is just how significant their presence was. No fewer than five rulers made it to York and, surprisingly to me at least, one died here and another was proclaimed emperor here.
    The famous travelling Hadrian was the first but Septimus Serverus had to come across the channel to quell the insurgency from up north. Thinking he had settled the matter he then repaired to York but the northern tribes opened up again and, the toll on his health was such that Serverus died here.
    Caracalla and Constantius put in an appearance before one of the greatest, appropriately named Constantine the Great and ultimately responsible for the Holy Roman Empire, was proclaimed emperor in this very town.

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    Enjoy the entertainers!

    by lou31 Written Jun 18, 2005

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    Purple man.

    This colourful character really earned his quid. I was fascinated by these entertainers. They completely paint themselves and their clothes, shape their accessories and stand completely still! Remarkable how they can transform themselves into a real like statue.
    They obviously go to great lengths with their costumes and can be quite deceiving!
    I'd hate to see what happens in a downpour though.

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    YORK AT NIGHT

    by balhannah Written Jan 31, 2012

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    If you have a chance, visit York at night.
    Thanks to Colin [Brittania2] and Maureen, who took us around and showed us the City lit up at night.
    It was lovely, especially the Minster, worth doing if you can!

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    Street scenes

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 27, 2005

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    Sorry, I'm into zips
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    The first shot is of a shop I never expected. They sell buttons, which is just as well, because Duttons for Buttons has over 16,000 different types. You can mail order from them, well, their Harrogate store anyway. Amazing.
    The Lowther (2nd pic) is a pub serving a variety of beers, wines and spirits as well as traditional pub grub. They also act as a bed and breakfast and have three guest rooms equipped with a television, shower and tea and coffee making facilities. Parking is available.

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    The clock

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 27, 2005

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    Spot the sun.

    This clock, should you see it, has a statue of an admiral on top of it. This statue was designed to follow the sun but, according to Dave, it hasn't worked for a few years. Having spent the majority of our first two weeks with umbrellas in hand, I could totally relate to the admiral's problem.

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    St Williams College

    by ettiewyn Updated Dec 8, 2012

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    St Williams College is a beautiful half-timbered building located close to the Minster. It was shown to me during our VT meeting and I thought it strikingly beautiful at once, especially when the sun was shining and the white looked so bright.

    The house was built in 1461 and it was a school for the young men educated at the Minster to become priests. It was named after St William, a nephew of King Stephen and maybe a descendent of William the Conquerer. During the 16th and 17th century it was altered a lot and was used as simple tenements. In the Civil War, it was used by King Charles I as home for his printing presses. Today, it can be hired for venues and is also home to a restaurant.

    You are free to walk into the inner courtyard and admire the fantastic framework!

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    A poignant reminder

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 26, 2005

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    Across the world

    Caroline Stuttle, just in her 20th year of life, was murdered. It hit home a little more to me perhaps because she was murdered in Australia, Bundaberg to be precise, while seeking the pleasures of life in a far off country. Probably killed by a transient drug addict seeking money. How tragic.

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  • Tips from a resident

    by fulford Written Apr 11, 2007

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    York is always busy with tourists, but they do not always find the best things to do.

    St Crux church in Whip-ma-whop-ma gate does the best cup of tea
    The best ghost tour starts from outside the Kings Arms pub
    The riverside pubs next to the City Screen cinema are great for a lunchtime meal when it is sunny (walk down the alley way towards the cinema from Coney Street)
    The art gallery is free, has excellent exhibitions and a good cafe
    Dick Turpin's grave can be visited in St Georges churchyard, George Street
    York is a great place to hire a bike because it is flat and has good cycle paths (for example along the river or along a disused railway line to Selby Abbey)
    If you are going to Jorvik either book in advance or go one hour before it closes to avoid the long queues

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    STATUE OF CONSTANTINE

    by balhannah Written Jan 30, 2012

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    Constantine

    Constantine, born in 272A.D to Constantius and Helena.
    I saw this big bronze statue of the Roman Emperor, sitting down and looking down on his broken sword, beside the York Minster, not far from what was the site of the Roman Legionary fortress.

    Helena was a devout Christian, promoting the faith in her charity work and for taking part in pilgrimages to the Holy Land. For this she was eventually proclaimed a Saint, and is remembered in York England by having St Helen's church.

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  • February break, Jorvik viking festival, York, Eng.

    by JoltingJoe Updated Jan 8, 2009

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    Vikingra!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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    Jorvik viking festival is a long established annual event that has appeal for all the family! There is a programme of events for you to follow most of them are free, but you can pay to participate in some very good events. I have been on the saga and song night which was excellent, the viking light spectacular with fire works display to finish. This year Im going on a coach tour to some churches ravaged by viking raids, which are on the outskirts of York and not usually easily accessible. If you are into the Vikings you can buy a range of jewellery or everyday objects, clothing, drinking and blowing horns, trinkets and leather drinking mugs. You can buy these goods at Barley Hall, the Jorvik centre or in Marquess in Sampson Square. On occassion they have talks by specialists talks by Archeologist at local seats of learning.
    Visit Jorvik viking festival web page for a programme Visit the museum gardens for a free battle show that will keep the whole family amused all morning. For refreshments I recommend a pot of tea and sandwich from a cafe next to the market, you can sit upstairs with a nice view. Find the Black Swan on Peasholme Green for a nice pint in a very old pub!

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