Goodramgate including Our Lady's Row, York

4 Reviews

Goodramgate, York YO1 7LF

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Goodramgate including Our Lady's Row
    by balhannah
  • Lady Row
    Lady Row
    by balhannah
  • Goodramgate including Our Lady's Row
    by Sjalen
  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    LADY ROW COTTAGE'S

    by balhannah Written Jan 31, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This row of joined together Cottage's are known as "Lady Row."

    They date from 1316 and are the earliest row of houses surviving in the city.

    The houses are very simple, made of plastered timber framing with roofs of curved tiles.
    The original row was 128 feet long and only 18 feet deep, and had two storeys and eleven bays. Each bay formed a single home with one room on each floor, but at least one tenement occupied two bays. They were built as a home for the poorer people of York.

    Seven of the bays remain largely intact today, others have been replaced by taller brick buildings. In 1827 there was a proposal to re-open the whole churchyard to the street by pulling down Lady Row altogether, thankgoodness this threat was never realized!

    I found these on Goodramgate street. They nearly hide the view of the Holy Trinity Church, and there is a reason for this. The houses were built in the original churchyard and their rental income was used towards the church's running expenses.

    Lady Row
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Lady Row

    by Sjalen Written Jun 20, 2010

    Goodramgate has a funny name which some people say comes from King Guthrum (Guthrumgate is the older name of the street) who was defeated by King Arthur, or it was named after a local warrior. Others say it was named after a lady called Gudrun, and to me as Swedish, this makes sense since the street was laid in the 11th century late Viking times to connect two Roman gates and Gudrun is a very Scandinavian name and just adds to the many other in this part of England (where Arthurian legends are not common).

    Built for the old church behind them, Lady Row from 1361 is the major sight in this street full of shops and pubs, and that is since not only is this row of houses lovely, it is also the oldest row of buildings in York. The upper and lower storeys of the building are different, with the upper part leaning out, a so called "jettied" house, which only adds to the medieval look. There are shops in the houses (in my days as a York citizen even a tea room) so you can see them inside but it's the outside that tells you most since you cannot see all the old features in the shop areas.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Our Lady's Row

    by iandsmith Written Dec 31, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You can tell by the tortured lines of the exterior that this street is either (a) very old or (b) built by a now-defunct building company. If you guessed (a), you'd be 100% correct; then again, you'd probably score well with (b) also.
    Our Lady's Row is famous because it houses some of the oldest buildings in England still standing, possibly even the oldest. They date back to the early 1300's but these days house shops.

    New, but really old
    Related to:
    • Women's Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Galahad's Profile Photo

    Goodramgate

    by Galahad Updated Feb 24, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The street gently curves towards the centre of the city from Monk Bar. The 14th century Lady's Row is in the centre of my photograph.

    Goodramgate 20.1.05
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: York

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

20 travelers online now

Comments

View all York hotels