Jorvik Viking Centre, York

3.5 out of 5 stars 30 Reviews

Coppergate,York,Y01 9W 01904 643211 Fax:01904 627097

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    Yorvic Viking Centre
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  • Gareth the Viking!
    Gareth the Viking!
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  • The Viking Village
    The Viking Village
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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Think about it.

    by leics Updated Nov 21, 2011

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A Jorvik queue.

    If you are expecting Jorvik to be some sort of theme park ride, you'll be disappointed. It's not.......it's an attempt to present the findings of an incredibly important excavation to the general public, whilst raising funds for continuing research. The unique waterlogged conditions of the Jorvik site enabled all sorts of organic material to be retrieved (from socks to cess) and added hugely to our knowledge of Viking life in York.
    If you are genuinely interested in finding out how people lived in the past, then Jorvik is for you.....but be prepared to queue!

    Updated November 2011: yes, people are still regularly queuing for Jorvik. Allow plenty of time for your visit.

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  • de2az's Profile Photo

    Take the tour

    by de2az Written Jan 15, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ok - no pic for this activity. Its definitely touristy, but if you have about 30 - 40 minutes to spare, take the tour. Its a 'ride' that takes you through the life and times of the Vikings when they settled in Jorvik (York) in AD 876. Definitely interesting (at least to ME!). At the end of the 'ride' there is a room where they explore more of an actual skeletal frame dug up from the archeological dig, pointing out actual fractures, wounds to the skull and other bones from battle. Quite interesting to see and learn about.

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  • planxty's Profile Photo

    You don't have to walk any more!

    by planxty Updated Dec 22, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Jorvik Centre, York, UK.

    I remember visiting the Jorvik Centre in York more years ago that I care to remember and, if memory serves, it was a walk-through experience of a recreation of what a portion of York would have been like when it was controlled by the Vikings and called Jorvik, hence the name. Well, on a recent revisit, it appears time and technology have finally caught up with our Norse forebears and they have taken the legwork out of it for you. More of that shortly.

    On entering the Centre, the first room you enter is fascinating and sets the scene for the subsequent activities. It is effectively an archaeological "dig", in situ, and covered by thick glass so you are literally walking over the remains of a Viking settlement exactly where it was built so long ago. I have seen a similar thing in Brno in the Czech Republic and it really does put all the slightly drier glass-encased artefacts in context. And there are plenty of artefacts to see, all the usual household, decorative and warlike items you would expect.

    On then to the "main event", and an explanation of the title of this tip. An excellent reconstruction of the place as it was 1,000 years ago, peopled by animatronic Vikings going about their daily tasks. But here's the good bit, you no longer have to walk, being instead transported by what the Centre likes to call "time capsules" for which read slow-moving roof-mounted funfair type cars. They are comfortable, even for a tall man like me, and you get a commentary (available in various languages) through the speakers in your headrest. It is a truly multi sensory journey. Watch out for some of the interesting smells!

    Having debussed from the "time capsule", you are into another couple of rooms similar to a museum although with some interactive features such as hologram actors recounting stories of daily life. I was particularly intersted here in a subject relatively recently explored on British TV where researchers have identified a Viking marker in human DNA and have mapped where in the UK the greatest concentrations of Vikings are. I'll not spoil it for you, but it is fascinating.

    The Centre is fully wheelchair accessible, with the following caveat from the website.

    "Due to health and safety regulations, only one wheelchair user can be in JORVIK at any one time. Wheelchair users must be booked in advance."

    Also, a more temporary inconvenience is that due to refurbishment in the early part of 2010 there will be no wheelchair access for about three months. This will also restrict the activities available for able bodied visitors.

    Hearing impaired visitors are catered for thus:

    "We have a ride capsule available that is installed with a hearing loop. (This covers all six seats in the capsule). A written version of the commentary is also available to ensure you get the most out of your visit. "

    There are also facilities for visually impaired visitors:

    "A large print commentary of the ride is available, as is a braille guide for the Artefacts Alive gallery. Guide dogs are welcome in the centre, although the ride may make some dogs nervous."

    I rather like the efforts the Centre have made to accomodate disabled people.

    The Jorvik Centre will appeal to children due to it's interactive nature, although there is plenty to keep adults amused as well. Allow about two hours to see the whole thing properly.

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  • carfan's Profile Photo

    Jorvik Centre

    by carfan Written Jul 12, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Jorvil Centre takes you back in time to the days of the Vikings and up to present day archaeolgical findings.

    You board a "time machine" and are wisked back in time to the Viking days. On leaving the machine you board capsules which take you through a typical Viking Village. A commentary tells you what you are looking at and a detailed outline of viking life. Blue Peter recently had one of its presenters added as a figure in the village along with one of the Blue Peter dogs!!

    After leaving the capsule, you find yourself in the area that covers what has been found during archaeological digs.The centre piece is a complete viking skeleton.

    From there you move to the small and expensice gift shop!

    While i enjoy the Jorvik centre, i always come away feeling "was that it?".

    Also you are are not allowed to take pictures as you move round the village.

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  • Myfanwe's Profile Photo

    The Jorvik Viking Centre

    by Myfanwe Written Jan 11, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Yorvic Viking Centre
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    The Jorvic Centre was created on the very site where between the years 1976-81 archaeologists from York Archaeological Trust revealed the houses, workshops and backyards of the Viking-Age city of Jorvik as it stood 1,000 years ago. Street life & day to day living can be seen as you step aboard a car which takes you to sample the sights and even smells of Viking life. In addition to this Viking 'street view' there are many great exhibits on display for you to peruse at your leisure. I enjoyed my visit to the Viking Centre although some of the smell as we travelled around the streets will leave a lasting impression!

    There is a great gift shop here, selling all sorts of Viking memorabilia.

    As with some of the other Attractions in York, the entrance ticket is valid for 12 months from the date of purchase.

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  • Arizona_Girl's Profile Photo

    I was actually impressed

    by Arizona_Girl Updated Jul 21, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This had all the ear markings of a really bad tourist trap. Yes in some ways it actually was. I give you that. A lady on the bus had said they had done it earlier that day and was actually impressed. I gave it a try and had the same response. They had an impressive collection of artifacts from the Jorvik days of York. I was not impressed with the corny ride they put us on, but the displays were actually really well done and informative. I was glad I took the lady's recommendation.

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  • ettiewyn's Profile Photo

    Jorvik Viking Centre

    by ettiewyn Updated Nov 24, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    I visited the Jorvik Viking Centre because I love history and the advertisement and travel guides made it sound as if it was a fantastic place to get up close with the Vikings, an attraction not to be missed - but I must say that I was very disappointed. I'm not saying you should not go there, but be careful what to expect...

    Jorvik is the Viking name of York. The Vikings invaded the area in 866, and they stayed nearly a hundred years. During this time, the city flourished and became an important trading post and harbour. In the 1980s, there were many excavations in Coppergate, where a lot of Viking things were found. These excavations helped to understand what Jorvik looked like and how the Vikings lived in the city. There were four buildings where countless everyday articles were found, as well as workshops, leftovers, animal pits, fences and fireplaces.
    At exactly that spot, the Jorvik Viking Centre was build and organized by the Archaeological Trust. When you enter, you can first see a part of the excavation area - it is covered by glass and you can walk above it and discover how it looks like. There are a few presentations about the Vikings and how they arrived in the area, as well as some exhibits.
    You then start a time warp experience, as you sit down in a kind of chairlift and are transported into Jorvik. You can not leave the chair, but are taken around a recreation of the Viking city - you can see many different Viking buildings as well as the Vikings themselves, life-size models (puppets, not real people). It is an audio experience as well, as the models tell you about their lives and also talk among each other about their daily business. You can see their buildings and workshops, their animals and food, their looks and clothing.
    So what did I not like about it? I don't know, I just found it not too interesting, and somehow I expected something different. I would have liked a recreated village where I can walk around and linger around in places I like better - not being shoved around without any power to control where I stay and where not. I also understand that it should be agreeable for children, but I still would have liked more information and not just the basic things...
    When you leave the time warp, there is an area that is more like a museum, with many interesting displays such as things excavated from the different workshops, weapons and jewelry. The exhibits were no doubt very interesting and I liked them, but nearly every display also had the depiction of a Viking (this time a dressed up man or woman, not a created model), telling you about their business when you come closer - and sorry, that was just too much. I would have liked to look at the exhibits in peace and quite for a few minutes without being bombarded by loud multimedia from all directions.

    I do understand the concept, to bring information to people in a non-academic way and to make it interesting and funny also for those who would usually not be that interested, by created a sort of experience and show instead of a traditional museum. I really do see the idea behind it, and there were some things I found interesting, but altogether, it was not my cup of tea, and I also thought it to be too expensive.

    Admission fee: Adults £9,25, Senior/Student £7,25, Child £6,25, family of four £26, family of five £29
    Opening times: from 10.00am daily, until 04.00pm in winter and 05.00pm in summer

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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Jorvik Viking Centre

    by Tom_Fields Written Jan 26, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Jorvik Viking Centre

    If you want to learn about York's history, especially its Viking heritage, this is an excellent place to start. The centre has exhibits, and a re-created Viking village. It also has displays of local archeology.

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  • ettenaj's Profile Photo

    yawnvik centre

    by ettenaj Written Sep 20, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    inside Yorvik Centre

    We queued for ages for this attraction, and were really dissapointed with it when we finally got in. Not a cheap 15mins, but we did get lots of fresh air waiting to get in. The only good thing I found was that each carriage had built in speakers so you select your own language.

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  • zadunajska8's Profile Photo

    Different, but not worth the money or the hype

    by zadunajska8 Written Nov 5, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Before going to York we had heard so much about this place and it seemed to be one of the main draws to the city. Unfortunately it didn't live up to the hype (which we had been warned by a couple of friends!). It is certainly different to your average museum as you get the ride through the mock Viking village with some quite life like models and very realistic buildings and artifacts along with the smells of the day. Unfortunately this was over much quicker than expected. The displays before the ride we could not get to see because of the 2 school groups which were using that room at the time. The displays after the ride looked good but the level of information was not as good as that provided in some of the other museums in York and again we had trouble seeing anything because here there was a school group running wild! The attraction is greatly overpriced for what it is and many of the items in the gift shop we had seen in the Yorkshire Museum at much lower prices. It was still interesting to go but was ruined by the presence of so many children with little supervision. I wondered if they were trying to aim at a more childrens/theme park type of audience rather than adults who are genuinely interested in history? Overall, disappointing, but if you are taking kids they will probably love it.

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  • tvor's Profile Photo

    Not worth the money

    by tvor Written Nov 28, 2012

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    Excavation model in the Viking Centre
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    I had heard the Jorvik Viking Centre was good. This was from several people who had been there a number of years ago, so I thought I would like to see it. They all said it was great, lots of earthy and even gruesome displays and really awful smells, which were to show you how it really would have smelled in the villages of the day. We discovered that it was a disappointment, at least to us.

    We made our way to the Yorvik Viking centre and paid almost 10 pounds each. There's a room with some displays and a glass floor over a model of the excavations in the area where the original Viking settlement was found. You get in a little cart on a track and are moved through a village with a narration. But it wasn't gruesome, there was no smell, and it was littered with animatronic villagers talking in some ancient language to you in reply to the narrator who then translated. It felt very sanitized and even Disneyfied, not really appealing to adults, not us anyway. There was a display room with lots of artifacts they've found in York while excavating, all Viking aged items including skeletons, coins, jewelry, glass etc. Overall, not really enough to be worth 10 pounds. It might appeal to families more, I guess, but we could have happily skipped it, had we known.

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    Jorvik Viking Centre

    by Drever Written Mar 6, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Jorvik Centre

    Many Vikings travelled here from their Scandinavian homeland during the period from 800 to 1050 AD until wars led to the end of their time. Although they gained a fearsome reputation originally they were full-time fishermen and farmers who spent much of the year at home. Only in the summer months did they rally to the call of a local leader and venture across the sea to raid, trade or seek out new lands to settle.

    In the late 1970’s, archaeological discoveries at Coppergate in the centre of the medieval town of York led to revelations of the Vikings age in York. Unusual oxygen free conditions in the soil helped preserve many materials that normally rot away. The city’s Archaeological Trust therefore took the decision to recreate the excavated part of Jórvík, as the Vikings called the town. It created the figures, sounds and smells, as well as pigsties, fish market and latrines, to bring the town of 25th October 975 fully to life using innovative interpretative methods.

    The JORVIK Viking Centre opened in 1984 as an educational entertainment exhibition to reveal the age of the northern settlers. An extension in 2011 added two new galleries. When you enter the centre you stroll down to a spacious room with a glass floor. Beneath the floor are the remains of an excavated part of the Viking settlement. Around the rest of the room are video shows, photos and artefacts from the dig for study as you wait for the main attraction.

    In a "time car," you travel back through the street market of 975 peopled by faithfully modelled Vikings. You go through a house where a family lived and down to the river to see the ship chandlers at work and the unloading of a Norwegian cargo boat. The cars take six individuals, takes about 20 minutes to complete the time travel, and give a commentary explaining what you are viewing.

    You get off the ride into rooms full of characters of Viking life with clips of actors explaining their roles. I was particularly interested in that of the woodturner as I do some woodturning myself. He occupied an important place in the settlement as he produced the cups, plates and bowls. Others though like the metal worker, cobbler and ship wrights were equally important.

    Artefacts and human remains excavated have helped explain how the ancient Vikings of Jorvik lived and died. Analysis of the remains revealed the variety of afflictions and diseases they suffered from, and what was in their diet. The new Last Vikings of Jorvik exhibit gallery look at the final battles of the Viking age which shaped the early middle-ages city of York and foreshadowed the arrival of the Normans.

    Kids can join the archaeological investigation at DIG. There recreated excavation pits allow amateur explorers to handle real artefacts and decide what their use might have been and how that helps explain the story of how people lived in Roman, Viking, and Medieval times.

    The Jorvik Centre is open from 10am to 5pm (last admission) April through November and 10am to 4pm from November to April.

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  • jobekenobi's Profile Photo

    Travel back in time

    by jobekenobi Written Sep 17, 2006

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    This is a museum with a twist - you go back in a time machine to the viking age and take a ride on a ship (?) thorugh the viking setllement of Jorvick, then return to the present dayfor a look round the find which the archeologists foudn on site. Very interesting and fantastic for kids as its very interactive and they get their own commentary on the ride. However, it doesn't take very long to look round this facility and the queus were very long so i was glad we had prebooked online and didn't have to wait (It was a ittle bit cheaper too!)

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  • yooperprof's Profile Photo

    Jorvik Viking Centre

    by yooperprof Updated Jul 13, 2006

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    The main entrance and gift shoppe

    Travel back in time to experience the sights and smells of medieval Jorvik!

    Hold onto your seat as the Time Travel Machine whisks you through crowded streets and alleyways!

    Wonder at the amazing finds from unexpected archeological discoveries!

    Be Entranced at the antics of the animatronic figures!

    Discuss Viking lore with costumed role-players - who fortunately speak modern English!

    Check out the tourist tat in the fine gift shop on your way out!

    Okay, Jorvik Viking Centre is a little bit hokey. I could have done with the "time travel" folderol, particularly the Who-ish figure in the lab coat who gives the main spiel about the "ride through ten centuries" that all visitors have to go through.

    But I give some credit to the people who organized this place. They really do have a treasure trove of important and fascinating artefacts from the Viking Era, and they are just trying to present the material in a manner that will be interesting and relevant for our over-stimulated age. From a museumological perspective, the Viking Centre breaks new ground.

    There are two distinct parts of the Experience: the first is a "ride" that takes visitors through a reconstruction of Jorvik (York) as it is thought to have been at the time of the Viking settlements here. I especially liked the blasts of often foul smells that are unleashed - very rarely do people have a chance to experience the smells of the past, and they certainly were powerful back then!

    In the second part of the experience you get out of the "time travel car" and walk through a series of more conventional exhibits; however, there are costumed role-players who interpret various experiences, and who offer a helpful personal perspective through their costumes, actions and explanations.

    Overall, it's worth it.

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    Jorvik Viking Center

    by Airpunk Written Sep 2, 2010

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    Jorvik Viking Center
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    Maybe this one was the largest disappointment in York, maybe I would have better enjoyed it if I were nine. The queue is usually deterrent, especially during the busy summer season. At least the actors – they do not only appear inside of the museum, but also entertain the kids in the queue – are good. Anyway, for that queing time and for that money, I expected somewhat more.
    The first part of the museum consists of multimedia shows as well as a fun fair – style ride through York in the viking era. It is also the part where the focus lies on and as I said, especially aimed at kids. The exhibition with archeological finds was OK, but it was somewhat spoiled by all the masses of visitors pushing you through the exit. If you are here for some light entertainment, are in York with kids or have seen everything else, I would recommend the visit. Otherwise, there are way better attractions in York which are even less expensive and suitable for kids as well (Castle Museum, Railway Museum,…). To avoid the queue, come very early or very late, at least during summertime. There is even a pre-booking service on their website for a small fee which can be used to jump the queue.

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