Micklegate Bar Museum, York

9 Reviews

Micklegate, York, North Yorkshire YO1 6JX +00 44 (0)1904 634436

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  • Micklegate Bar Museum
    by ettiewyn
  • Micklegate Bar Museum
    by ettiewyn
  • Micklegate Bar Museum
    by ettiewyn
  • ettiewyn's Profile Photo

    Micklegate Bar

    by ettiewyn Updated Nov 26, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Micklegate Bar originally dates back to the 1100s, but only the lower storeys are from that time. The upper parts were added in the 14th century. In the Middle Ages, it was the most important of York's city gates. This also becomes evident in the name, as "Micklegate" derives from Mykill Gata, meaning "great street". In order to defend the city, the gate also had a barbican, which was removed in the 19th century. But it was also home to many living and dead people: The rooms were rented out since the 12th century, and the head of traitors were skewered upon pikes and exhibited on the gates.
    It is the custom that when the ruling monarch visits York, he or she must stop at Micklegate Bar and must ask the mayor for permission to enter.

    Today, the gate is a museum, and you can learn more about many aspects that were important in Micklegate Bar's history. There are exhibitions about how the city was defended, and also about the people who lived here and the traitors whose heads met their fate on the gate's walls.
    There is a lot of information and there are also interesting historical items and replicas to see. In addition, the building is an attraction in itself, and I think I would pay an admission fee just to see the interior, even if it wasn't a museum - the old walls and stones, the low ceilings and just the overall atmosphere of such an old building... Fascinating!

    Photo 2: A German sallet from the 15th century. This is a replica and you can lift it to see how heavy it is. Unbelievable that people could wear these for hours, let alone fight wearing them!
    Photo 3: A padded coif from the early Middle Ages, made of linen or calico and stuffed with straw. It was worn under the helmet to cushion the head. Again a replica.
    Photo 4: A watchman's uniform.

    Admission fee: adults £3,50, concession £2,50, children free - included in the York Hidden Secrets Pass!
    Openen times: 10.00am to 04.00pm in summer, 11.0am to 03.00pm in winter, open daily but closed in December and January. The Museum will be closed if the city walls are not open.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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    Micklegate Bar Museum

    by Sjalen Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Micklegate was one of the most important gateways to York and the city entrance to and from the south of England. Amongst its more gruesome history is the fact that it was used to hang the heads of executed people from, to show the citizens of York what would befall those who tried to rebel against the King. One such rebel was Richard III's father the Duke of York, before the city later turned to the Yorkist case in the War of the Roses and Richard's brother, then King Edward IV removed his father's head when he came to power. The museum shows all this in its section on the War of the Roses, which also tells you of Charles I and his base here when fighting the Scots and during the Civil War later. There is also a section on local families who lived in the gate when possible in more peaceful times. All in all, a small but very interesting museum for history buffs.

    Mickelgate Bar without heads
    Related to:
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    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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    A spesial man

    by blackmamba Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On our second and last day we had plan to see Mickel gate museum...
    A nice man was working there, he did tell us alots of history and told us to walk in to the round towers.. on one side you can se how fare down it is... on the other side... iiiiiiiiik.. well he did say that we coud se how high the tower is.. well.. I did not come so fare, befor I knew it a "man" did stand infront of me... a doll man from the past.. sceard the hell out of me..
    The building is old and the sters a bit creepy.. but we made it to the top.. great to se the heads of great british men ;)
    I also lost mine :)
    So if you are planing a trip to York.. you have to make time to Mickel gate Bar

    me

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    Micklegate Bar

    by Balam Written Oct 11, 2010

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When the medieval city walls were completed the gate called Micklegate Bar became the main entrance into the city. The oldest parts of the gateway (Bar) date back to the 12c but this ancient gateway has changed over the years.

    The Bar was restored and refurbished by The York Archaeological Trust and the Micklegate Bar Museum reopened in the Spring of 2010.

    28th May - 31st October Open 7 days a week 10am - 3pm

    1st November - 31st November Open 7 days a week

    11am - 3pm (weather dependent)

    1st December - 31st January 2011
    Closed

    Micklegate Bar Micklegate Bar Micklegate Bar Micklegate Bar Micklegate Bar
    Related to:
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    • Castles and Palaces
    • Budget Travel

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Micklegate Bar

    by Airpunk Written Aug 31, 2010

    Micklegate Bar is one of the four preserved main gates of York and was its main entrance. When a royal visit was expected, this was always the gate to be used. The name comes from the nordic myla gata, meaning “great street”. Bar is the barrier used to prevent other from entering the city without paying the respective toll. And if you werer note weclome in this city or are regarded as a traitor, your head may appear on top of this gate. At least, that’s how it was in the Middle Ages. The gate was built in the 12th century, but rebuilt and expanded in the 14th, resulting in today’s gate. Today, it houses a small museum about the history of the gate and some general items related to the history of York. Some of the plastic heads of “traitors” seem there since the Middle Ages, judging from the spiderwebs around them… Anyway, the museum is one of the five so-called “hidden secrets” of York. If you visit the museum, ask for this free “hidden secret” discount card. If you pay the full price at one of these attractions, you will only pay half the price at the other four. The “hidden secrets” are Barley Hall, the Richard III museum, Micklebar Gate Museum, the Roman Bath and the Merchant Adventurer’s Hall.

    Micklebar Gate View from Micklegate Bar The hidden secrets of York The exhibition inside the tower The gatehouse from inside the city
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  • Aitana's Profile Photo

    Micklegate Bar

    by Aitana Written Jul 13, 2008

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    Micklegate Bar was the traditional ceremonial gate for monarchs entering the city, who, in a tradition dating to Richard II in 1389, touch the state sword when entering the gate.
    A 12th century gatehouse was replaced in the 14th century with a heavy portcullis and barbican.
    Traitors' decapitated heads used to be displayed on the defenses. One of them was Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York (1461).
    Nowadays, the upper two floors contain a museum of the bar.

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  • Goner's Profile Photo

    Micklebar

    by Goner Updated May 4, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Micklegate (the name derives from the Viking "myla gata" or "great street") marks the main entrance to the city. It is also the traditional entry point for kings and queen's visiting York. The gatehouse is four stories high, and contains living quarters on its upper floors. A simple gatehouse was constructed here in the 12th century, but elaborate defenses were added in the 14th century. There is a small museum inside now which traces the history of the Bar and the city itself. Micklegate Bar was also the place where traitor's heads were displayed to deter rebellion - some heads were left there for years.

    Mickelbar
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

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    City Wall and Gates

    by hayward68 Updated Sep 20, 2002

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    Wander the city walls of York and take the time to examine the various gates leading to the city. These walls were first built in Roman times and were added to over the years and are some of the best preserved walls in England.
    The gate pictured is called Micklegate and the main road to the south went through it. It was the focus for civic events, such as the greeting of a monarch, and was used to display the severed heads of traitors. Some of the heads displayed here were those of Richard Duke of York (1461), Earl of Devon (1461) and Earl of Northumberland (1572).

    Micklegate

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  • M.E.R.V's Profile Photo

    Micklegate

    by M.E.R.V Written Sep 22, 2003

    in the past, heads on display on the gate. today, cars drive through the gate now to get to the other side of the city.

    bad foto soz...

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