Treasurer's House, York

4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars - 13 Reviews

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  • Blue Drawing Room
    Blue Drawing Room
    by Landotravel
  • William and Mary staircase
    William and Mary staircase
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  • Beautiful front and garden.
    Beautiful front and garden.
    by Landotravel
  • ettiewyn's Profile Photo

    Treasurer's House - garden

    by ettiewyn Written Dec 6, 2012

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    The Treasurer's House also features a wonderful garden, and the great thing is that this garden is free to visit - you don't need to pay the entrance fee to the house to go there. There is a small gate in the wall surrounding the garden, and you can just walk in.
    This must be one of the favourites of all the wonderful gardens I visited in the UK. It is such a tranquil and idyllic place, and the enormous presence of the Minster makes it all the more special. There are some delightful statues and a well, and the garden is beautifully maintained and arranged. I really do recommend a visit here if you like to sit down on a bench and have a little break!

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  • ettiewyn's Profile Photo

    Treasurer's House

    by ettiewyn Updated Dec 6, 2012

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    The original treasurer's house at this spot dated back to medieval times and was indeed the home of the Minster's treasurer. Since then the house has been rebuilt and renovated so many times that it does not really resemble the original house anymore, but it is still a very pretty and interesting building. In 1897, it was purchased by the industrialist Frank Green, who made it the home of his large and unique collection of art. Every room is constructed and decorated differently, according to the period it represents and the objects it holds. Thus, you are welcomed by a reconstructed medieval hall when you enter, and in the end you arrive in some wonderful Edwardian rooms.
    Frank Green gave the house to the National Trust in 1930 so that it could become a museum.
    The objects in the collections range from paintings and furniture to antiques and ceramics. And just the architecture and design itself is worth a look!

    The Treasurer's House is famous for another reason, it is supposedly a haunted site where the ghosts of marching Romans were seen in the cellar. The man who saw them wondered why he could only see them down to the knees, the feet and lower legs were not visible. Years later, it was discovered that there had been a Roman road underneath the cellar - the Romans were marching on it and therefore were only seen above their knees.
    There are special tours of the cellar if you are interested in this kind of story!

    I did not do the cellar tour, but I wandered around the house using the audio guide provided. This was very interesting because the guide explains a lot of features, making it much more worthwhile.

    Opening times differ a lot, therefore please see here.
    Admission fee: Adults £5.70, children £2.70, family: £14.15

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  • Landotravel's Profile Photo

    More beautiful than ghostly

    by Landotravel Updated May 19, 2012

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    Beautiful front and garden.
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    Treasurer's House is shown at every York's leaflet as a reference for ghostly tours and quest for mystery. Well, not having seen any ghost and with a refernce guide at hands I can say that this very beautiful ancient residence at York deserves much more than being known as a mere ghostbuster's task. These historically important foundations, the beautifully orned rooms, the atmosphere, the superb small gardens around, etc. make this interesting building another York's must-see.

    It's interesting to note that we can see this building nowadays thanks to the work of a very peculiar and interesting person: Frank Green. This wealthy bachelor Yorkshire art collector devoted much of his efforts to improve the family's social status due to the fact he had not noble ancestors, and did it in the way of refinement and culture, not only money. He had a real passion for interior desing and decoration and, as a recollection of his aims he adquired the house in 1897. He deeply restored the decaying building with the idea of recovering the ancient splendor under a very personal interpretation. He demolished uncongruous aditions, rearranged and refurbished for years and he got finally a real art-piece house with its 13 "period rooms" (rooms that reflect the period of furnitures within) so walking through them means discovering four centuries of furniture, textiles, ceramics, etc.

    At last, in 1900 Green got success with the Royal Visit to the house: King Edward VII, Queen Alexandra and Princess Victoria. In regard of it, the rooms were they slept keep their names. In 1930, after having the house opened to the public from long ago, Green moved to Somerset and gave Treasurer's House to the National Trust being so its first complete historic house. Nevertheless, it seems he menaced to return to haunt the house if any of the furnitures was ever moved!.

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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    Treasurer's House

    by spidermiss Updated Jan 3, 2012

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    Treasurer
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    This property was served as the Medieval treasuer of York Minster, hence the name, during the Middle Ages until the 16th Century. The Treasurer's House was subsequently owned by a number of private owners including Frank Green who was the last private owner. Frank Jones was a successful industrialist in Wakefield during the 19th and 20th Century. He was known to have constantly changed the interior decor of the house during his time there - in fact, from the information leaflet, he wanted each room to reflect a specific period (four centuries in total!). Interestings facts I learnt during my visit was that he was fussy with his food and that he hired a French chef to cook for him! And that his laundry was sent weekly down to London! In 1930, the house with a 300 years collection of antique furniture, textiles and painting were given to the National Trust when Frank Jones moved down South.

    There are a number of ghost stories linking to this property and there are ghosts tour offered at the house, usually in November, and one can enjoy the immaculate gardens at the front.

    One of our highlights was having lunch in their lovely tea room. My friend had home made soup and I had sandwiches (from local produce) and accompanied by Yorkshire tea. The lunch cost us 5-6 GBP each. There is also an opportunity to indulge in a Yorkshire Cream Tea.

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  • Myfanwe's Profile Photo

    The Treasurers House

    by Myfanwe Written Jul 17, 2010

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    The Treasurers House
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    The Minster Treasures lived in this Grand house until the Reformation. The last Treasurer was William Cliff who in 1547 remarked "as the treasure has been confiscated, there is no need for a treasurer!" The present building dates mainly from the 17th/18th Centuries. The house stands within the area of the Old Roman Barracks and the cellar is said to be haunted by a band of Roman soldiers who reputedly appeared to be marching on their Knees from one wall and disappearing into the opposite wall. Strangely when the cellar was excavated, a Roman road was found two feet beneath the floor.

    Nowadays, the house and its' contents are in the care of the National Trust. You can take a look around the rooms, visit the ghostly cellar or take a look around the edwardian servants quarter.

    Check out the website below for prices and opening times.

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  • Balam's Profile Photo

    The Treasurer's House

    by Balam Updated Jul 7, 2010

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    The Treasurer's House
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    The Treasurer's House is a stone Dutch-gabled house built on the site of the home of the Treasurer of York Minster and has beenbuilt over a Roman road you can pay extra to go on a guided tour of the cellar said to be haunted by Roman soldiers or to the Attic rooms that were the Edwardian servants' quarters .

    The house was bought by Frank Green in 1897 and restored with each room being decorated in the style of a different period.


    House: £5.40, child £2.70, family £13.50. Groups £5.40.
    Ghost Cellar: £2.15, child £1.60.
    Attic: £2.70 child £2.30
    Charges to cellar and attic apply to National Trust members.
    Free children's trails, audio, welcoming guides. Free access to the tearoom, art gallery and walled garden.
    .

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  • margaretvn's Profile Photo

    the Treasurers House.

    by margaretvn Updated Apr 27, 2008

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    This is a lovely, mainly 17th century, house which is built over a Roman road and it is named after the Medieval treasurer of York Minster. There is a series of period rooms showing decoration, glass and china from the 16th to the 20th century.

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  • Britannia2's Profile Photo

    Treasurers House

    by Britannia2 Updated Mar 23, 2008

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    The Treasurers House is a 17th/18th century house in the heart of York near the Minster. There are four centuries of styles on display in the house and although we have never been in the house it is recommended by friends.
    The grounds are worth seeing and are free to access - it is a pleasant place to take a sandwich in the summer - although one of Yorks most famous tea rooms is in the house.
    Not very good for disabled access so check before you go if a wheelchair user.

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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Treasurer's House

    by Tom_Fields Updated Jan 26, 2006

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    The Treasurer's House

    This was originally the home of Yorkminster's treasurer. He was responsible not only for the Minster's assets, but also for playing host to distinguished visitors. Originally built shortly after the Norman Conquest, it was burned in the fire of 1137, and rebuilt in the 13th century. The house had considerable modifications later on, and presents an eclectic melange of styles. It is now a property of the National Trust, and is open to the public.

    It is also reputed to be the most haunted house in northern England. The most notorious ghost story concerns a Roman legion that has been observed marching through the cellar. People say that the soldiers are visible only down to their knees. An archeological dig revealed an ancient Roman road, running though the property, about two feet below ground level. Go figure.

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    The Treasurer's House

    by sandysmith Written Jul 28, 2003
    Treasure's House

    This building was originally the home of the medieval treasurers of York Minster. It dates mainly from the 18th century but contains work of the 13th and 14th century. It stands on the site of the Roman Imperial Barracks, remnants of which remain. The house was presented to the National Trust in 1930 upon the death of industrialist Frank Green, the last private owner.

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  • cheekymarieh's Profile Photo

    Treasurer's House

    by cheekymarieh Written Jun 20, 2003

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    Treasurer's House

    The building is now owned by the National Trust but was formerly the home of the cathedral treasurer's home. That position was abolished between 1547 and the 19th century. The main exhibits within the property are period furniture. The gardens are particularly worth a look around. They are laid out as a typical country garden.

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  • hayward68's Profile Photo

    Treasurer's House

    by hayward68 Updated Sep 22, 2002

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    Treasurer's House

    The history of the house dates from about 1419 and it was used as the residence of the Treasurer of the Minster. Most of the building dates from the 18th century though.
    It was built over a Roman Road and in the basement a close circuit tv shows a section of this road. The basement is also supposedly haunted by Roman Legionnaires who once walked this Roman road.

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  • Treasurer's House

    by sabsi Updated Jun 26, 2003

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    Treasurer's House

    This used to be the home of the treasurer of York Minster. It is now a medieval museum with a nice little park in front where you can spend all your time taking close up pictures of flowers ;-)

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