York Minster, York

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    York Minster outside
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  • uglyscot's Profile Photo

    York Minster

    by uglyscot Updated Jun 20, 2011

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    facade
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    This magnificent cathedral dominates York with its lofty spires and its bells that ring out loud, long and clear. I was unable to get more than a quick glimpse of its interior and famous stained glass, because the crowds were too thick, but walking round and focussing on the magnificent facade was enough to satisfy me.
    The Minster is the largest Gothic cathedral in Northern Europe.

    The first Minster was built for the baptism of the Anglo Saxon King, Edwin of Northumbria. It was made of wood and had been built for the occasion, in 627. It was soon rebuilt in stone. As Edwin was killed in battle in 633 the task of completing the new stone church fell to Oswald. It was built on the original site and was enlarged over time.
    In 1069 it was badly damaged by fire when the Normans took control of the city of York.
    After taking control of the city, the Normans decided to to build a new Minster on a new site. About 1080 Thomas of Bayeux became Archbishop and started building the cathedral that became the Minster we know today. Additions to the nave, rebuilding of the central tower
    which collapsed, and the western towers were added. In all it took 250 years to build .

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  • hundwalder's Profile Photo

    Review of York Minster for the first time visitor.

    by hundwalder Updated Apr 4, 2011
    One of the main walls of York Minster.
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    York Minster is definately one of the greatest and best preserved masterpieces of Gothic architecture and stained glass art. It was originally designed as a Romanesque Norman cathedral, but more than 100 years into its construction following a major fire, the original design was scrapped in favor of the flambouyant Gothic style that was becoming popular for European churches. However, many of the Norman elements were retained.

    The tops of the three main towers contain platforms that are shielded by what appears to be defense bulwarks. The towers therefore resemble the rooks of a medieval fortress castle, which is largely what they originally served as. It was determined that the massive stone ramparts built around the city did not provide sufficient protection against the invaders. The cathedral and its towers provided a second line of defense. The lantern near the top of the main tower helped the defenders of the city spot enemies who approached during the night. Because the towers were not to be supported by flying buttresses, they had to be built with very thick walls. Photo #1 shows some of the many spires.

    Photo #2 is an interior view of the cental nave. The intricately vaulted Gothic arched ceiling was strengthened in tension by wooden ribs and ties. The ceiling elements were all outlined in gold long after the original construction was completed.

    The north transept of the cathedral is dominated by the "five sisters" windows ( shown in photo #3 ), which is a brilliant set of five lancet windows topped by five smaller lancets. The windows are all made from many small pieces of glass fused together. These brilliant windows were crafted by an early form of monochroming. It is difficult to imagine that these windows are 750 years old. The Great East Window, completed in 1408, is the largest cycle of monochromed, medieval stained glass windows in the world. The walls of the cenral nave are completely lined with cycles of exquisite stained Christian events.

    With the exception of the stained glass windows and the fascinating arches and pillars, you will no doubt notice the almost complete lack of sculpture and other artwork. During the "reformation" minded reign of Queen Elizabeth I, the cathedral was stripped of memorials, altars, vestments, sculptures, portraits, and tombs. These adornments were features of Catholic churches, and thus had no part in the Anglican minster that the cathedral had been converted into. Because the many sculptures of saints were transformed into sculptures of former British kings, they were allowed to stay in place. Surprisingly enough the many gargoyles protruding from the spires were not destroyed. Possibly the queen was fond of these stone beasts.

    Open to the public: Monday through Saturday 0900 - 1700
    Sunday 1200 - 1545
    Closed a few times per year for important religious events. ( see web link )
    General admission: £ 5.50 adults, £ 4.50 students and 60+ seniors, children under 17 free of charge. Separate admission charge to climb lantern tower, and to visit undercroft. Combinded tickets are available. Additional charge for photography permit. Admission was free of charge when old hund visited in 2001. Perhaps it was just after my visit when the holy church decided that one too many cheapskates had toured the cathedral.

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  • Goner's Profile Photo

    A Massive Cathedral

    by Goner Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    York Minster

    York Minster is one of the most impressive cathedrals I've seen in Europe, it overwhelms the town of York. It's difficult to take a picture of all the Minster because it is so large and because the town surrounds it.

    A good way to view the Cathedral together with its buildings and grounds is to walk the city walls between Bootham Bar and Monkgate Bar. This should be followed by a tour inside the Minster, including the Choir Screen which has fifteen statues of the kings of England from William I to Henry VI. For the more energetic there is a climb up the 275 stone steps of the spiral stairway to the top of the Central Tower, which provides splendid views over York. On clear days you can see more than 35 miles of the surrounding countryside

    The large Rose Window shown in the pictures was originally built in 1500 but due to a 1984 fire it was rebuilt in 1987.

    Opening Times:
    Summer 07.00-20.30
    Winter 07.00-18.00
    Admission: no charge, but a donation is requested

    I see now they charge to visit the Minster:
    Entry into the Minster
    Adult: £4.50
    Children (under 16s): Free

    Entry to the Undercroft, Treasury & Crypt
    Adults: £3.00 Children: £1.50
    Entry to the Tower : Adults: £2.50
    Children: £1.00

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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    York Minster

    by spidermiss Updated Mar 20, 2011

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    A lot of history has been made at this Gothic Minster, the largest medieval cathedral, since the 600 AD! Those who had made a mark at Minster are buried there including Emperor Constantine; Edwin of Northumbria, an Anglo Saxon King and past and present Archbishops including St William of York

    The very first Minster was built in the 7th Century and was a small wooden church. During the 12th Century, the Normans who acquired York built a Minster on the very same spot and replaced the previous one. The church enlarged and Walter Gray, the archbishop, in 1215 comissioned for the church interiors to be added including transepts, the naves, the Lady Chapel and the Quire. The interiors were completed over three centuries and the Central and Western towers were added to the Minster.

    Today, the Minster remains intact despite fires in the 19th Century and extensive renovations in the 20th Century. Work to and the discovery of the Minster is still ongoing by The York Minster Revealed project which is supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

    On our visit in March 2011, my friend and I went on a Tower Tour where we climbed 275 steps to the top and we got great views of York down below and the amazing architecture! One criticism is that we were not given much time at the top and the staff were keen for us to ascend and descend as soon as possible! On a future visit to York, I would like to explore the Minster itself more thoroughly.

    It costs us 5.50 GBP (March 2011) to go up the tower.
    If you want to visit the Minster itself including the Undercroft, Treasury and Crypt, it would cost you 9 GBP but you get a free audio guided tour.

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    York Minster

    by Airpunk Updated Sep 2, 2010

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    Perhaps York’s best-known attraction and surely one which represents York’s history better than any other. It was built on the site of a former Roman Fortress and has been the center of Christianity in Northern England since the 7th century. This church from 637 dedicated to St. Peter still forms the base for the present building. In later centuries, the church was destroyed several times by fire or Danes and from 1220 on, the church began to take its present appearance. A fire in 1984 damaged parts of the transept. During the restoration works, children were encouraged to design a part of the new transept, giving it a very colourful appearance.

    Among the items in the Minster you shoudn’t miss are following:

    -Five Sisters Window: Five original 13th century stained glass windows
    -Great East Window: Largest medieval stained glass window in the world
    -Rose Window: In the southern transept, commemorating the union of the Houses Lancaster and York after the ascension of Henry VII.
    -15th century choir screens with depicitions of all English Kings from William the Conqueror to Henry VI. (Henry VI only fitted in because of a miscalculation of the masons. Note that his niche is smaller than the others).

    Note also one of the bosses (the decorations where the stone beams meet on the roof). One of them, where Maria was breastfeeding baby Jesus was replaced by prudish victorians by a boss where she feeds him with a bottle…

    Even if you are not interested in history, you can easily spend an hour in this building. People with an affinity for the past should take three hours for it. For the latter group, there is a free optional guided tour through the building which is included in the price. The entry fee includes a visit to the crypt with a great exhibition about the history of York minster which I highly recommend. The exhibition will even lead you through the ruins of the Roman fortresses and the early medieval parts (or ruins in some cases) of the church. Free audioguides are available too. A visit to the tower is possible, but will costs you an extra 5 pound bill per adult (or four per child as of Mid-2009).

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  • Arizona_Girl's Profile Photo

    Breathing Church

    by Arizona_Girl Written Jul 21, 2010

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    The York Minster was much more impressive to see than West Minster. Yes West Minster had all the famous people there, but that was all it had going for it. York Minster boasts all sorts of history. Beautiful views from the top (don't go up the stairs if you are claustrophobia). The largest collection of mid-evil stained glass in all of England. I enjoyed the architecture of the building. The reverent feel of it. I spend half my day in the church. I do regret not taking the opportunity to go down to the underground section. I hear it was really cool and I missed out.

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  • Myfanwe's Profile Photo

    York Minster

    by Myfanwe Written Jul 15, 2010

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    York Minster
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    York Minster is the largest medieval Cathedral in England. It is a wonderful gothic building which dominates the City. It was built over the military headquarters of the Roman Garrison. It started its' life as a small wooden church in 627 AD and was built for the Anglo Saxon King Edwin. Edwin introduced Christianity by marrying a Southern Christian Princess called Ethelberga. She brought with her a Priest called Paulinus, later to become the first Bishop of York. A Norman Cathedral was started in 1080, taking about 20 years to build. It was this Cathedral whichwas re-built from about 1220 that resulted in the present day Gothic Cathedral.

    When you're walking round the outside don't miss the wonderfull craftmanship of the gargoyles and carved statues.

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  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    York Minster

    by Sjalen Updated Jun 18, 2010

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    The largest Gothic cathedral north of the Alps and a must for church goers and non-church goers alike, this is truly one of Europe's great sights and the main reason for some to visit York. The crypt still has Roman remains from Emperor Constantine's time if that appeals to you - there has been a place of worship here for a very long time. You can visit the tower with views of Yorkshire in good weather (see fourth and fifth photo) but try to do it early since queues can otherwise be long. York being in the flat Vale of York, this is one of the few places in the city itself with good views for miles. The staff managing the tower are a bit brusque and because of the queues, they have a calling system urging you to move on up there if you stop.

    The stained-glass windows are world famous, not least the Rose Window but several others are also worth admiring. Another interesting bit is the Chapter House (the conical looking building at the back) where the Minster finances were discussed and which has strong links to Richard III. One part of the Minster was badly damaged in a fire in 1984 which my now husband happened to see since he lived in one of the few hilly parts of the city (it happened after a thunder storm following a service where god's existence was questioned - spooky) and don't miss some children's contribution to the repair works after a competition in BBCs Blue Peter. When asked what symbolised modern man enough to merit it a place in the Minster, the winning children desiged 'man on the moon' and a whale amongst other things and they can be seen on bosses in the ceiling when you queue to the tower visit.

    The Minster opens 7.00 and stays open until 18.30 unless there is something special going on. However, during services it is of course not open to sightseeing (Sundays before 12.00 is a no-goer) and Easter is a particular time to carefully check opening hours. Evensong or Advent is also a nice time to visit and but then you cannot walk around of course, just listen to music. Bring a cardigan even on a warm summers day - you will visit a huge stone building and it is not warm, especially since heating it would nibble away even more at the already huge costs for running this magnificent building where repairs are always ongoing in one corner or other due to the sheer size of it. This is the reason you nowadays have to pay an entrance fee if you visit at other time than for services - as with many other churches around Europe, the state now pays nothing to keep this architectural gem open. If you want to know more about the architecture and history of the Minster, you should visit its offices at St William's College (see tip) where there is also a tea room.

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  • tim07's Profile Photo

    York Minster

    by tim07 Updated Apr 2, 2010

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    The Minster has to be one of the World's greatest cathedrals. The First Minster in York was built in the 7th century, first of wood & then of stone. It survived the Viking age but was badly damaged by fire when the Normans took control of the city in 1069. The Normans built a new Minster on a fresh site to replace the damaged one. Early in the 13th century work began to transform it into the Minster we see today. The work was completed in the late 15th century, taking about 250 years.

    The main purpose of the Minster is as a place of worship, services take place daily. As well as this the Minster has so many beautiful & historic things to offer the visitor. The Knave, Crypt, Chapter House, magnificent stained glass windows and a climb up the tower.

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  • alyf1961's Profile Photo

    YORK MINSTER

    by alyf1961 Updated Feb 10, 2009

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    YORK MINSTER

    York Minster is the largest gothic cathedral in northern Europe. It was built between 1220 and 1470.The Emperor Constantine lived here, and the foundations of the Roman buildings in which he lived can be seen under the central tower. The windows are beautiful and well preserved. There are many windows, chapels and memorials to see at the cathedral.
    admission charge includes an audio tour

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  • Herwig1961's Profile Photo

    Masterpiece of architecture

    by Herwig1961 Written Nov 14, 2008

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    York minster.There are a lot of VT. members which have much more knowledge about history and height and other details.They stated their tips and there is not much to add.I came rather randomly to York(only a short stay)and didn`t even know about this beautiful church.I was and I am still impressed by this cathredal!

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    YORK MINSTER - YORK'S ICONIC LANDMARK

    by LoriPori Updated Sep 26, 2008

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    West Front - View from Low Petergate
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    The second largest Gothic Cathedral in Northern Europe (largest is Cologne Cathedral) is York's most Iconic Landmark. YORK MINSTER was built over a span of 250 years. The present building was begun in 1230 and completed in 1472. The Minster is 158 metres long and each of its three towers are 60 metres high. The place was Huge. I can't describe my feeling when I first laid my eyes upon it. Besides the Mosque/Cathedral in Cordoba, Spain, I have never seen anything so magnificent.
    In my General Tips area, I will talk individually about the main features of York Minster, like The Nave, Chapter House, North Transepts, the Quire, etc.
    You can also climb the Tower for breathtaking views of York. I declined, but Hans opted to climb the 275 steps to the Tower.

    2008 Prices:
    The Minster - Minster, Quire & Chapter House
    Adult 5.50
    Senior/Student 4.50
    Child (16 & under) free

    Minster Plus - Minster + Tower or Undercroft
    Adult 7.50
    Senior/ Student 6.00
    Child 2.00

    Do Everything - Minster + Tower + Undercroft
    Adult 9.50
    Senior/Student 8.00
    Child 3.00

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  • margaretvn's Profile Photo

    York Minster

    by margaretvn Updated Apr 27, 2008

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    York Minster
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    Visit York Minster - it has to be the highlight of a visit to the city.
    York Minster is the largest Gothic church north of the Alps and I think it is also the most beautiful. It is 163 metres long and 76 metres wide across the transept. It houses the largest collection of medieval stained glass in Britain. The Minster was probably started as a wooden chapel used to baptize King Edwin of Northumbria in 627. There have been several cathedrals on the site, including an imposing 11th century Norman church. Todays Minster was started in 1220 and completed 250 years later. A fire in July 1984 destroyed the south transept and the restoration cost 2.25 million pounds.
    The Rose Window with its central sunflower is really beautiful, this is now being restored. The some of the stained glass in the Minster dates from the late 12th century.
    Opening times for the Minster:
    mon-sat:09.00 - 17.00 (09.30 nov-mar)
    sunday 12.00 - 15.45

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  • hundwalder's Profile Photo

    Great Gothic cathedral of Yorkshire

    by hundwalder Updated Apr 6, 2008

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    York Minster from the northwest corner.
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    York Minster is the second largest Gothic era cathedral in northern Europe, exceeded only in size by The Cologne ( Koln ), Germany dom. The cathedral is 160 meters ( 524 ft. ) long, 76 meters ( 249 ft. ) wide, and the distance from the marble floor surface to the top of the ceiling arches is a dizzying 27 m. ( 90 ft. ). In other words, the central nave could be converted into a football stadium, although the Archbishop of York has strongly discouraged all attempts to do this. The twin west towers are each 56 m. high, while the central lantern tower defiantly rises to a height of 71 meters. Because of the cathedral's overwhelming size and the other buildings tightly packed around it, it is nigh impossible to get a single photograph of the entire building from ground level. Photo #1 was the best I could do. Photo #2 is a closeup view of one of the twin towers.

    The seemingly impossible undertaking of building this enormous cathedral commenced in AD 1080, when virtually the entire population of Great Britain lived in shabby little huts with dirt floors. The new cathedral was built largely on the foundations of the original church, which dated back to about the year 650. The first church was in turn been built on the foundations of the Roman fortress that the Christian emporer Constantine once called home. Keeping this in mind there is little wonder why the massive cathedral experienced so many foundation problems over the centuries that followed.

    After the citizens of York had toiled feverishly building this great shrine for more than 200 years, a band of ragged but fierce Scots under the leadership of William Wallace, decided to rebel against the tyranical and highly ambitious King Edward I. In order to show Edward that they meant business, they sacked and captured the city of York ( largest city in northern England at the time ), and beheaded the Lord Mayor. It is reported that the Scots also did considerable damage to the half finished cathedral. However, the people of York were a can do lot. They picked up the wrecked pieces, and started immediately with the restoration and construction. The great shrine to God and the godlike kings was pronounced officially completed in 1472, only 160 years after Wallace's devastating seige. This was indeed an incredible accomplishment.

    Stay tuned for old hund's next York Minster tip, where he actually tells a little about the fascinting architecture and art.

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  • Ben-UK's Profile Photo

    York Minster

    by Ben-UK Written Oct 15, 2007

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    York Minster

    Building started on the present cathedral nearly 800 years ago in 1220, but after parts collapsed in later years it would be 250 years until it was finally completed and consecrated in 1472. Unfortunately I didn't have time to go in during my visit so I can't offer a personal description -- their website is below.

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