Yorkshire Musem, Gardens, Etc., York

33 Reviews

Yorkshire Museum & Gardens Museum Gardens York +44 (01904) 687687

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  • Yorkshire Musem, Gardens, Etc.
    by stevemt
  • Yorkshire Musem, Gardens, Etc.
    by stevemt
  • Yorkshire Musem, Gardens, Etc.
    by stevemt
  • ettiewyn's Profile Photo

    Museum Gardens

    by ettiewyn Updated Dec 9, 2012

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    The Museum Gardens were another of my very favourite places in the city. They are a wonderful area stretching from the river to the Yorkshire Museum, and featuring some interesting sights such as St Mary's Abbey, the Hospitium and St Leonard's Hospital. But apart from these sights, they are just a perfect area to relax. I loved coming here in the evening after a day of walking around and sightseeing, and to just sit down on one of the benches and wind down while enjoying the atmosphere. There are many wonderful trees and flowers, and you can also watch countless of squirrels hurrying along and looking for food.

    The Museum Gardens are a place that is enjoyed by locals and tourists alike. As they are located on the way from the train station to the city, they are even a perfect stop after a day trip by train, and I always liked to take in a little of York's atmosphere before walking back to my accommodation.

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    Museum Gardens - St Mary's Abbey

    by ettiewyn Written Dec 1, 2012

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    Close to the Yorkshire Museum building, there are the ruins of an old abbey. Unfortunately, I could not really see them, because when I visited York the ruins were covered by a large stage construction, erected for the Yorkshire Mystery Play, which is an annual event taking place every summer. Thus, not much of the abbey was visible, basically just the entrance. Through the windows of the basement of the Yorkshire Museum it was possible to see another area of the abbey, but rather an unpretentious one with only a few smaller stones.

    The first abbey in this location was founded in 1055, and in the following decades and centuries it changed hands several times. The abbey was totally rebuilt in the second half of the 13th century and it became one of the richest abbeys in Northern England, but during the dissolution of the monasteries under Henry XIII it was dissolved and destroyed.

    Apart from the ruins in the gardens, there are some other remains you can see around York: The Hospitium, that is located in the gardens, too, and the King's Manor at Exhibition Square which once was the abbot's house. Along Bootham, you can also see part of the old walls that once encircled the whole abbey. Unfortunately I forgot to take pictures of it, although I walked along every day.

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  • ettiewyn's Profile Photo

    Yorkshire Museum

    by ettiewyn Updated Nov 24, 2012

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    I had seen the grand looking building of the Yorkshire Museum from the outside quite often before I actually visited the museum itself, and it lived up to my expectations! Moreover, 2012 was a special year for a visit, as the museum celebrated "1212 - The making of York", in celebration of the thousand year old history of the city.

    When you enter, you first encounter displays about Yorkshire's Roman history, showing many Roman artifacts. These include tomb stones, everyday articles, a Roman mosaic floor, as well as a statue of the Roman god Mars, according to the museum "the finest Roman statue in Britain". This gallery is a partnership gallery of the British Museum.
    You then walk down to the basement where the Medieval galleries are located. Here you can see quite a lot of things connected to the Minster and other churches in York, as well as displays connected to Medieval kings and queens. There are also some wonderful Anglo Scandinavian gold items and weapons.
    In addition to these historical collections there are geological and biological galleries, but I mostly skipped these.

    I could not at all decide which pictures to include in this tip and which not, so in the end I created a separate travelogue - please click here to see my favourite displays of the museum!

    Admission fee: Adults £7,50, concession £6,50, children under 16 free
    Opening times: 10.00am to 05.00pm daily

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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    Yorkshire Museum & Museum Gardens

    by spidermiss Updated Jul 18, 2012
    Yorkshire Museum Gardens, York
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    We had hung around in Yorkshire Museum's Gardens whilst waiting for our boat cruise. We didn't go into the musuem but used our waiting time to take the traditional VT photos as shown. On a future York visit I would love to visit the museum and explore the gardens thorough. Here is the museum's website for further information.

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  • zadunajska8's Profile Photo

    Impressive and very modern for a provincial museum

    by zadunajska8 Written Nov 7, 2011

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    This place seems to have only recently reopened before our visit in November 2010 after a major refurb. I've no idea what it was like before but the museum now is pretty impressive. It's not a huge place but it will still take a couple of hours minimum to get round it all. The Roman and medieval history sections were particularly interesting.

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  • Arizona_Girl's Profile Photo

    Well Done, Lots to See

    by Arizona_Girl Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Roman solider staue

    I love Science Museums the MOST! I love historical museums too. This place is both. I was in heaven. Its next to the ruins of St. Mary Abby, take a bit of time to enjoy it and the gardens. That part is free to everyone. But don't miss the museum. It wasn't an expensive museum to visit (7 pounds). It has a whole range of exhibits.

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  • cheekymarieh's Profile Photo

    The Yorkshire Museum

    by cheekymarieh Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Yorkshire Museum

    It is located within 10 acres of Museum Gardens. It contains Roman, Anglo Saxon and Viking art galleries , as well as the £2.5 million Middleham Jewel, a gold amulet engraved with the Trinity and the nativity, and holding an enormous sapphire.

    In the museum gardens, you will find peacocks wandering among the ruins of St Mary’s Abbey, once the most influential Benedictine monastery in northern England. In the basement of the Yorkshire Museum there is an exhibition on what abbey life was like.

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Museum Gardens

    by Airpunk Written Sep 2, 2010
    Former St. Mary's Abbey
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    On the grounds of the Yorkshire Museum, these gardens are open to the public even at times when the museum is closed. The most impressive bits are the ruins of the former St. Mary’s abbey. They are the remains of a monastery which was founded in 1088 but met the fate of most medieval monasteries in England: Dissolved by Henry VIII. OK, they are not as impressive as Fountains abbey which is just a daytrip away, but still worth a visit and for free. If this wasn’t enough to convince you, the gardens also have a couple of sculptures, the remain of a roman fortress and a medieval building.
    Entry to the gardens is free, check the museum site for the opening times.

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  • Myfanwe's Profile Photo

    The Hospitium

    by Myfanwe Written Jul 18, 2010

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    The Hospitium
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    The Hospitium is situated within the lovely museum Gardens. It is the oldest surviving timber framed structure in York today, dating from the 14th Century. It is now cared for by the York Museum Trust and is used as a venue for conferences, seated dinners and Christmas functions.

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  • Myfanwe's Profile Photo

    St Mary's Abbey

    by Myfanwe Written Jul 15, 2010

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    St Mary's Abbey
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    St Marys Abbey was one of the first monastic houses to be established in Yorkshire after the Norman conquest. It was founded in 1080 by Benedictine Monks and became one of the wealthiest benedictine abbeys. It was dissolved on the orders of Henry VIII in 1539 and subsequently fell into a state of disrepair.

    The Abbey is situated in the corner of the Museum gardens and would be a lovely place to just sit and read a book on a sunny day.

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  • Myfanwe's Profile Photo

    Yorkshire Museum

    by Myfanwe Updated Jul 15, 2010

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    Yorkshire Museum

    The Yorkshire Museum hosts a wealth of collections, including a large number of archeological finds which portray Yorkshire life from Roman times to medieval. The museum was closed during our visit but we hope to call in here next time we're in York.

    The newly refurbished museum opens on Yorkshire Day - 1st August 2010.

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  • Britannia2's Profile Photo

    The Yorkshire Museum

    by Britannia2 Updated Apr 27, 2009

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    Yorkshire Museum
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    The Yorkshire Museum was opened in 1830 by the Yorkshire Philosophical Society, a society devoted to the study of science through public display and study of archaeology, geology and natural history collections. It was one of the first purpose-built museums in the country.
    The museum was built on the site of the medieval St Mary's Abbey and remains of the abbey can be seen on the lower floor of the museum. The story of how the monks lived is told here. The ruins of the Abbey's church, gatehouse and precinct wall can be seen in the Museum Gardens.
    Further on in the museum our Hunters and Hunted gallery focuses on the sea creatures which lived millions of years ago in the time of the dinosaurs.
    Adult- £5Child - £3.50Under 5s - FreeConcessions - £4Residents with a York Card - FreeTwo adults with:One child - £12Two children - £15& £3 per child after that (2007 prices). However once tickets are purchased you can go back for free for up to a year.
    If you do not want to visit the museum the grounds are very welll worth seeing.
    Closes 2/11/09 until 1/8/10.

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  • Aitana's Profile Photo

    St Mary’s Abbey

    by Aitana Written Jul 13, 2008

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    The Abbey of St Mary in York is a ruined Benedictine abbey. The original abbey on the site was founded in 1055 and dedicated to Saint Olave. St Mary's was once the largest and richest Benedictine establishment in the north of England and the abbey was one of the largest landholders in Yorkshire. However, in 1539, during the Dissolution of the Monasteries under Henry VIII, it was closed and subsequently substantially destroyed.

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  • margaretvn's Profile Photo

    the Yorkshire Museum.

    by margaretvn Updated Apr 27, 2008

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    The museum is set in a lovely garden in the middle of York and it shows you about 2000 years of Yorkshire history. There are archaelogical collections covering the Roman, Anglo-Saxon, Viking and Medieval times.

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  • Britannia2's Profile Photo

    St Marys Abbey

    by Britannia2 Written Oct 5, 2007

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    St Marys Abbey ruins

    The ruins of St Mary's Abbey, first built in 1088, are all that remains of one of the wealthiest and most powerful Benedictine monasteries in England.
    The abbey estate occupied the entire site of the Museum Garden and the abbot was one of the most powerful clergymen of his day, on a par with the Archbishop of York.
    The monks would spend their days working in abbey administration, copying books, trading with merchants, providing food and supplies for the monastery, managing the abbey’s estates and helping the poor.
    Visitors can see the remains of the walls of the nave and crossing of the abbey church, where the monks prayed and sang, and the cloister, where the monks washed their clothes, contemplated and were allowed to speak.
    King Henry VIII banned all monasteries in England in 1530s. The monks at St Mary's were pensioned off in 1540 and the abbey buildings were converted into a palace for the King when he visited York.
    Gradually they fell into ruins and were used as agricultural buildings before being excavated by the Yorkshire Philosophical Society in the 1820s.

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