Yorkshire Dales National Park Things to Do

  • West Burton, Bishopdale, Wensleydale
    West Burton, Bishopdale, Wensleydale
    by spidermiss
  • West Burton, Bishopdale, Wensleydale
    West Burton, Bishopdale, Wensleydale
    by spidermiss
  • Wensleydale, Yorkshire Dales National Park
    Wensleydale, Yorkshire Dales National...
    by spidermiss

Best Rated Things to Do in Yorkshire Dales National Park

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    BRIMHAM ROCKS

    by LoriPori Written Sep 20, 2008

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    Monday September 8, 2008
    Situated on a hill overlooking Summerbridge and Lower Nidderdale, BRIMHAM ROCKS are a series of shaped millstone grit outcrops, sculpted by erosion during the last Ice Age.
    The curious rock formations are scattered over some 50 acres on Brimham Moor and provide a great variety of weird and wonderful shapes. Many of the rock formations suggest all manner of things, including elephants, hippos, bears (Dancing Bear), Mushrooms and some are said to have an association with the Druids. Most of the rocks owe their bizarre shapes to erosion during and after the Devensian Glaciation Period.
    Brimham Rocks, which is in the care of National Trust, is near Summerbridge and located 4 miles east of Pately Bridge, 10 miles north west of Harrogate and 10 miles south east of Ripon.
    Open all year round from 8:00 a.m. until dusk
    There are no entrance fees, but it cost 3.50 pounds to park (park & display)

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    BOLTON ABBEY

    by LoriPori Updated Sep 21, 2008

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    View of The Priory from the Tea Terrace
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    Set in the heart of the Yorkshire Dales, on the banks of the River Wharfe, the historic estate of BOLTON ABBEY is the Yorkshire home of the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire. Visitors are drawn to its breathtaking landscape - just under 30,000 acres of countryside. You can explore the ruins of the Priory, wander along the woodland, walk along 80 miles of footpaths and heather moorland.

    Open every day from 9:00 a.m.

    Only 5.50 pounds per day for a group of up to 7 people in one vehicle
    Your ticket can be used for all three Estate Car Parks on the date of purchase

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    Dent

    by Ben-UK Written May 19, 2006

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    Dent village
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    Nestling in the beautiful, secluded Dentdale, Dent is a classic Yorkshire Dales village, full of cobbled streets, whitewashed cottages and little shops. Dent was the birthplace of Professor Adam Sedgewick, an eminent Victorian geologist, and a huge granite fountain in the village commemorates his life. The village has existed since Norman times, St. Andrew’s Church having a Norman doorway, and the village even today certainly has an ancient feel about it, especially the streets with the Sun Inn and the George and Dragon Hotel (see 'more photos') -- if you’re in the western part of the Yorkshire Dales, do make the effort to visit this little gem.

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    Kirby Lonsdale

    by Ben-UK Updated May 19, 2006

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    Ruskin's View, Kirby Lonsdale
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    Not actually in Yorkshire (Kirby Lonsdale is just over the county border in Cumbria), but this old market town really marks the western edge of the Yorkshire Dales and such luminaries as Ruskin, Wordsworth, Turner and Constable all considered it well worth visiting.

    Ruskin’s View, my main photo – if you walk through the yard of St. Mary the Virgin church, you’ll come to a spot at the far side where John Ruskin admiringly looked out over the Lune valley and a plaque there says the following – “The view in front of you was described by John Ruskin in 1875 as ‘one of the loveliest in England, therefore in the world’ – painted by Turner in 1822 the scene presents a gentle panorama of river, meadow, woods and hills in almost perfect balance.” – a perfect description of the sight before you.

    Take a walk down Mill Brow in the town centre (see 'more photos')-- at one time a stream ran down the centre of the street to provide the town's drinking water and also powered nearby mills

    Another notable feature is Devil’s Bridge which straddles the River Lune (see 'more photos')– it’s original date is not known although records in the late 14th century tell of repairs to a bridge in the town.

    The town itself is a delight to walk around with lots of shops, cafes, old pubs and a busy market square.

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    Ingleton Waterfalls Walk

    by Ben-UK Written May 19, 2006

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    Hardraw Force
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    Just a short walk from the village of Ingleton, the Waterfalls Walk is a delightful 4.5 miles (7.2km) of woodland paths along the rivers Twiss and Doe taking in the various waterfalls on the way. It’s quite an arduous walk with lots of steps and although the paths are clearly defined, in places it can be quite uneven and muddy, especially after rain, so take your walking boots.

    The walk was first opened in 1885 and is now one of the most popular walks in the Yorkshire Dales – if you’re in this area it’s something you really should do.

    My main photo is of Hardraw Force -- please see 'more photos' for photos of Pecca, Beezley and Rival Falls.

    The walk is open from 9am every day, admission charges in 2006 were as follows :-

    Adults – Pounds 3-50
    Children under 16 years – Pounds 1-50
    Family – Pounds 7-00 (2 adults and up to 2 children)

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    Wharfedale

    by Ben-UK Written May 22, 2006

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    Wharfedale, looking down to Kettlewell village

    Wharfedale starts in the north around Hubberholme and Buckden and then runs south along the route of the B6160 road as far as Grassington, before it heads south-east towards Addingham on the A65 -- the above area is known as Upper Wharfedale and contains many places of interest. Picturesque villages like Kettlewell, Burnsall and Grassington (where there is the Upper Wharfedale Folk Museum), the overhanging rock at Kilnsey Crag (see separate tip), Bolton Abbey (the estate owned by the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire) -- the best way to see it is to just drive along the B6160 at a leisurely pace, take in all the scenery and stop-off at places that take your interest.

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    Ingleborough

    by Ben-UK Written May 19, 2006

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    Ingleborough

    At 2,372 feet (723m) Ingleborough is one of the celebrated 3 peaks of the Yorkshire Dales (the other 2 being Whernside and Pen-y-Ghent). It is frequently climbed as part of the 'Three Peaks Challenge', which is a 24 mile (38 km) circular challenge walk starting and finishing in Horton in Ribblesdale. The name Ingleborough means 'fort on the hill' and remains of an Iron Age fort have been found at the summit.

    My photo was taken from the north end of the Ingleton Waterfalls Walk (see separate tip)

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    Bishopdale

    by Ben-UK Written May 19, 2006

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    Bishopdale
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    Bishopdale is a delightful valley that runs from Aysgarth in Wensleydale down to Cray and Buckden where Wharfedale begins -- from Aysgath in the north, take the B6160 road south and enjoy the rolling pastureland and all the wildlife that live there (see 'more photos' to see some of the residents) ....

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    Wensleydale

    by Ben-UK Written May 22, 2006

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    Wensleydale, near Hawes

    Famous for its cheese, the lush valley of Wensleydale runs east to west across the middle of the Yorkshire Dales and is probably the most visited. In the west there is the waterfall Hardraw Force (see separate tip) which is just north of Hawes (see separate tip) the 'capital' of Wensleydale. Moving westwards you come to the village of Bainbridge and then the falls at Aysgarth (see separate tip), then Bolton Castle and Leyburn.

    It's a pleasure to drive through Wensleydale and admire the scenery, the miles of dry-stone walls surrounding the fields, the wildlife and of course the little villages, each with their own character.

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    Hawes

    by Ben-UK Updated May 19, 2006

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    Hawes
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    Now the main village in Wensleydale, Hawes is a bustling market town surrounded by beautiful countryside. The main street is full of pubs, cafes, and restaurants, indicating its popularity, although for me, the amount of cars parked permanently on the main street seems to take something away from the attractiveness of the village – nonetheless, it’s an ideal base to explore Wensleydale and while you're there, don't forget to try the famous Wensleydale cheese.

    The name Hawes derives from the word Hause meaning a narrow neck of land and the village was granted its Market Charter by William 3rd in 1699.

    The Dales Countryside Museum in Hawes is housed in the former Hawes railway station and is open every day from 10am to 5pm (closed 24, 25, 26 December and 1 January) – the museum tells the story of the people and the landscape of the

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    Ribblehead Viaduct and Whernside

    by Ben-UK Written May 19, 2006

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    Ribblehead Viaduct  backed by Whernside peak.

    Carrying the renowned Settle to Carlisle railway, Ribblehead Viaduct, built between 1870 and 1875, is a classic piece of railway engineering but its construction sadly caused the loss of life of many railway workers ('navvies'). The viaduct has 24 massive stone arches 104 feet (32 m) above the moorland and it runs for 440 yards (402m) next to the peak of Whernside. Such was the loss of life (possibly in excess of 200) that the railway company paid for an expansion of the nearby graveyard at Chapel-le-Dale.

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    Askrigg

    by Ben-UK Written May 19, 2006

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    Askrigg village
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    A classic, unspoilt, Wensleydale village -- and I suppose that's the reason they chose it to be the home of a long-running TV series, James Herriot's 'All Creatures Great and Small' which ran from 1978 to 1990.

    Askrigg goes back a long way -- it received its market charter in 1587, but that was only because nearby Wensley was virtually wiped out by the plague in 1563. Askrigg therefore enjoyed prosperity for many years but the age of the steam railway brought a sudden decline as the main Wensleydale train station was to be situated at nearby Hawes -- and thus Hawes became the 'capital' of Wensleydale as it is today.

    So now Askrigg receives visitors interested to see the home of the vet of the TV series who bring some welcome trade to Askrigg once again.

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    Bolton Castle

    by nickandchris Updated Nov 7, 2007

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    Castle Bolton
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    A most splendid ruined castle situated in the village of Castle Bolton on the northern side of Wensleydale. It was built by Lord Richard Scrope in 1379 to guard the dale. It is presumed the village was built at the same time.
    From July 1568 to Jan. 1569 Mary Queen of Scots was held prisoner here. She managed to escape for a few hours before being re-captured near Leyburn. and once again imprisoned.
    The castle remained in the hands of the Scropes family until 1630 when it passed to the Orde Powlett family. It was wrecked during the Civil War following a Parliamentary seige and for a long time the ruins have been open to the public and prove to be a huge attraction.
    Some of the rooms have been fitted out in the period and depict various scenes of castle life. There are also audio guides in a couple of rooms.
    Re-enactments are often a castle feature and in season the Sealed Knott perform jousting and feasting activities amongst others. We were very taken with the oxen being roasted over the huge kitchen fireplace on our first visit. This visit the castle didn't seem as big, or should I say there didn't seem to be as many parts of the castle open to tourists, only one tower was open and the courtyard was closed as the roof was being re-fettled. I'm sure we saw more, on our first visit.
    Outside are gardens being restored. These include a herb garden, a maze and a vinyard. Not ideal to linger in in the pouring rain!!

    Open:- April - Oct. 10am to 5pm.
    Nov. - March 10am. to 4pm.

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    Thornton Force

    by Ben-UK Updated Jul 13, 2013

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    Thornton Force

    In the north-west corner of the excellent Ingleton Waterfalls Trail you'll find Thornton Force,
    a delightful waterfall formed as the River Twiss cascades 14 metres over a limestone cliff -
    it inspired the great artist William Turner and I'm sure it'll inspire you as well :)

    Below a link to the Ingleton Waterfalls Trail :-
    http://www.ingletonwaterfallstrail.co.uk/

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    Aysgarth Falls

    by Ben-UK Updated May 19, 2006

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    Aysgarth Upper Falls
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    The falls at Aysgarth are in 3 parts, Upper, Middle and Lower (see 'more photos') -- they're not high-dropping falls, rather gentler falls as the River Ure tumbles over limestone steps. There's a Yorkshire Dales National Park Information Centre here with a 'pay and display' car park -- from there the paths to the falls are well signed. The falls are on private land and there is an 'honesty box' donation of 1 pound on the approach to the Upper falls -- from there you walk back towards the Visitor Centre, past the stone bridge and pick up the path to the Middle and Lower Falls -- this path takes you through beautiful bluebell woods with much wildlife about. The distance is about 1 mile (1.6km) from the Upper Falls to the Lower Falls.

    The Information Centre has computerised and hardcopy information about the falls and also serves food.

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Yorkshire Dales National Park Things to Do

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