Newark upon Trent Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by tim07
  • Things to Do
    by tim07
  • Things to Do
    by tim07

Most Recent Things to Do in Newark upon Trent

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    Civil War Trail.

    by sourbugger Updated May 5, 2014

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    Civil War trail.

    The local council has recently developed a 'town trail' linking together several buildings and places associated with the Civil War times. It begins (appropriately enough) at the ruined castle, and goes up to the marketplace and the church area before heading back to the riverside.

    It takes less than an hour and has been well thought-out. I especially likes the Charles I tea room, which is about as 'quaint' as you can get for Newark. Charles' wife Herietta apparantly stayed here without her husband, but was adequately chaperoned.

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    NEWARK CASTLE GARDEN'S & INFO CENTRE

    by balhannah Written Feb 1, 2012

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    I think the garden's beautify the Castle. There a garden bed's with annual's growing, plenty of pathway's and plenty of seating.
    The Tourist Information centre is located in Gilstrap House where there is a FREE exhibition about the castle, and the town's history during the English Civil Wars.

    The Rotary club have a bronze layout of the town of Newark.

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    NEWARK CASTLE

    by balhannah Written Feb 1, 2012

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    Newark Castle ruin's looked well kept and looked after. They were set amongst nice garden's, and there was plenty of signposted information.

    It is thought, the Castle was originally a Saxon fortified manor house, founded by King Edward the Elder. From 1123-33, Bishop Alexander the Magnificent completely rebuilt the castle, and then in the 13th century, the castle was substantially rebuilt with a new riverside curtain wall, still more alterations in the 15th and 16th centuries, when the castle became more of a palace. King John of England died at this castle in 1216, and during the reign of Edward III, it was used as a state prison.

    After the Civil War, only the gatehouse, including chapel and lodgings, curtain wall and north-west tower now remains. Well worth having a look around.

    The castle grounds are open daily, dawn until dusk. FREE
    Guided tours of the Castle’s towers and dungeons are available.

    There are car parks nearby.

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    OSSINGTON COFFEE PLACE

    by balhannah Written Feb 1, 2012

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    There is a story to the Ossington Coffee Place, which now is a Restaurant.

    This smart building was opened in 1882 by Viscountess Ossington as a temperance hotel, in the hope of tempting farmers away from the demon drink (alcohol).
    Since Newark was at the time the biggest centre of brewing in the country, this was rather laughable! Whether this worked or not, who know's!
    On the death of her husband, she gave the building to the town in memory of her husband, who had been Speaker of the House of Commons. The rooms included coffee room, assembly rooms, club room, reading room, billiard room and dormitories for travellers, as well as providing stabling for forty horses, sheds for carts, a bowling green, and a tea garden.

    Now it is being used as a Restaurant.

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    NEWARK TOWN HALL

    by balhannah Written Feb 1, 2012

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    Town Hall

    Located in the large Market Place is this impressive civic building, built in 1774, in Georgian style.
    I was tricked when I first saw it, as on the front is the name "Butter Market."

    It has balustrade, urns, lion, unicorn and "Justice".

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    WALK - TO SEE THE OLD BUILDING'S

    by balhannah Written Feb 1, 2012

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    Old Bank
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    This Market Town was easy to walk around as it was all flat going.

    I found all type's of building's and Museum's here, like the once premises of the Nottingham and Nottinghamshire Bank. [photo 1]
    There were a lot more sturdy brick building's here, than I had seen else where!
    Now, don't let us forget the Castle ruin's and the River where you can do a cruise.
    Quite a nice Market Town........

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    THE GOVENOR'S HOUSE

    by balhannah Written Feb 1, 2012

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    Govenor's House
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    The Governor of Newark Castle, Sir Richard Willis, lived in this Tudor building during the Civil War. Prince Rupert had his famous quarrel with Charles I here in October 1645.
    The building is 16th century, and has been used as shop's for the last 100year's.

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    YE OLDE WHITE HART

    by balhannah Written Feb 1, 2012

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    The historic building in my photo, is what used to be, "Ye Olde White Hart," a very important Inn during and after the Civil war, and the busiest coaching Inn in town in the 1830's.
    Originally a house called The White Hart, it dates from the 14th or early 15th century. The rectangular arch on the left was the entrance for coaches and is characteristic of all old coaching inns.

    Located in the south-east corner of the Market Place and now the premises of Nottingham Building Society, who have restored this old building.

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    ST. MARY MAGDALENE CHURCH

    by balhannah Written Feb 1, 2012

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    St. Mary Magdalene
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    This Church is said to be one of the finest parish churches in Nottinghamshire.
    It is one of the largest churches in England, with a 252 ft west tower that can be seen from anywhere in Newark, so you know what to do if you get lost, head for the Tower!
    The spire dates from 1230, while the rest of the church was rebuilt in the 14th and 15th centuries.
    Inside, it's a mixture of Norman, early English, and Tudor Gothic.

    THE CHURCH IS OPEN.... 08:30-12:30 & 1.30 -4PM Mon-Sat, plus Sun afternoon.

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    THE CASTLE BARGE

    by balhannah Written Feb 1, 2012

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    Guess what the Castle Barge is?

    The Castle Barge is Newark's famous floating pub!

    This old grain barge, built in 1923, was converted into its present form in 1980. Serves typical bar food daily although the range is small (small galley), it is reasonable value.
    It is open from 10.30 till late, and has an outdoor sitting area

    The pub is situated just on the edge of Newark by the bridge near the castle.

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    RIVERSIDE PARK

    by balhannah Written Feb 1, 2012

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    Newark Castle
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    This was our first stop in Newark, the Riverside Park located alongside the River Trent.

    A large park and display car-park was located here, and Toilet's. The park is a large lawned area, from where we had a great view of the Castle from the waterfront.
    This park is used for a lot of the Town event's, such as music concerts, food fairs, funfairs and duck races. It looked like you could swim in the River here.
    Every Wednesday an auction market is held on the Riverside Park arena, next to the car park on Tolney Lane.
    There is a pathway alongside the River, looks like you can walk for quite a way.

    When were saw how close the Town was, we left the Car in this car-park and went walking from there.

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    St Mary Magdalene

    by leics Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Aim for the spire!
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    A large and airy Medieval church, right in the centre of Newark, with many interesting bits and pieces within.

    Dating from the 1400s, with gargoyles and architectural twiddles on the outside.

    Inside, brasses and Medieval stone carvings, misericords and choir stall woodwork from the early 1500s, a very early crypt (may be inaccessible), chantry chapels and artworks.

    My travelogue has more information.

    Well worth visiting.

    Give at least 1GBP donation if you want to take photos. Churches like this cost a lot of money to keep in good repair, and they are worth every penny.

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    Mary Magdalen Church

    by Sjalen Written Mar 16, 2011

    Around 1180 is the first time that this Norman church is first mentioned, but only the crypt is still left from that time. There are however the remains of an earlier Saxon church underneath this one too, so the place has long been sacred. The glory days for the church was around 1220, but up until the 15th century it was expanded here and there and is today seen as quite a big church for its place.

    A chapel with 12th century stained glass is amongst the real gems here, but also some 17th century "graffitti". The 72 metre tall church tower is said to be the fifth tallest amongst parish churches in England and is one of the first things you see in Newark as you arrive (see the photo on my intro page).

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    Newark Castle

    by Sjalen Written Mar 16, 2011

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    Trying to catch a train, I never crossed the road

    A Saxon king built a fortress along the river here and it is quite easy to see why the location was chosen, and the castle in its heydays was called the "Key of the North". In 1073, when Newark still belonged to Lincolnshire, the Bishop of Lincoln took it over and started the building of a castle, which was then improved and continued in Norman style 1123-33 by another bishop. It was used as a mint, and in 1216 King John stayed here, but was already suffering from dysentery and in fact died here in the castle which now looked more like a palace.

    In the 16th century, King Henry VIII of course took the castle off the bishops, and later Charles I's troops moved in here, but in 1646 during the Civil War, the castle was wrecked and the royalists surrendered. It since fell into disrepair and today, the impressive castle walls is the main thing to see, along with the entrance to the dungeons.

    A park was built around the castle in 1887, and here you find the Gilstrap Heritage Centre which sometimes has exhibitions on local history. The park is also popular with locals going for a stroll along the river, and summertime also for concerts.

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    Millgate Museum

    by leics Written Apr 1, 2009

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    Museum exterior

    Housed in an old oil-seed mill on the banks of the River Trent, this museum houses a variety of objects.

    It's free to enter, but the various floors are only accessed by stairs...so no use at all for anyone with a disability.

    When I visited I didn't stay long, because there was a large and noisy group visiting at the same time.

    Next time, I'll explore further.

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