Newark upon Trent Travel Guide

  • Things to Do
    by tim07
  • Things to Do
    by tim07
  • Things to Do
    by tim07

Newark upon Trent Things to Do

  • NEWARK CASTLE GARDEN'S & INFO CENTRE

    I think the garden's beautify the Castle. There a garden bed's with annual's growing, plenty of pathway's and plenty of seating.The Tourist Information centre is located in Gilstrap House where there is a FREE exhibition about the castle, and the town's history during the English Civil Wars. The Rotary club have a bronze layout of the town of...

    more
  • NEWARK CASTLE

    Newark Castle ruin's looked well kept and looked after. They were set amongst nice garden's, and there was plenty of signposted information. It is thought, the Castle was originally a Saxon fortified manor house, founded by King Edward the Elder. From 1123-33, Bishop Alexander the Magnificent completely rebuilt the castle, and then in the 13th...

    more
  • OSSINGTON COFFEE PLACE

    There is a story to the Ossington Coffee Place, which now is a Restaurant.This smart building was opened in 1882 by Viscountess Ossington as a temperance hotel, in the hope of tempting farmers away from the demon drink (alcohol). Since Newark was at the time the biggest centre of brewing in the country, this was rather laughable! Whether this...

    more
  • NEWARK TOWN HALL

    Located in the large Market Place is this impressive civic building, built in 1774, in Georgian style.I was tricked when I first saw it, as on the front is the name "Butter Market."It has balustrade, urns, lion, unicorn and "Justice".

    more
  • WALK - TO SEE THE OLD BUILDING'S

    This Market Town was easy to walk around as it was all flat going.I found all type's of building's and Museum's here, like the once premises of the Nottingham and Nottinghamshire Bank. [photo 1] There were a lot more sturdy brick building's here, than I had seen else where!Now, don't let us forget the Castle ruin's and the River where you can do a...

    more
  • THE GOVENOR'S HOUSE

    The Governor of Newark Castle, Sir Richard Willis, lived in this Tudor building during the Civil War. Prince Rupert had his famous quarrel with Charles I here in October 1645. The building is 16th century, and has been used as shop's for the last 100year's.

    more
  • YE OLDE WHITE HART

    The historic building in my photo, is what used to be, "Ye Olde White Hart," a very important Inn during and after the Civil war, and the busiest coaching Inn in town in the 1830's. Originally a house called The White Hart, it dates from the 14th or early 15th century. The rectangular arch on the left was the entrance for coaches and is...

    more
  • ST. MARY MAGDALENE CHURCH

    This Church is said to be one of the finest parish churches in Nottinghamshire. It is one of the largest churches in England, with a 252 ft west tower that can be seen from anywhere in Newark, so you know what to do if you get lost, head for the Tower! The spire dates from 1230, while the rest of the church was rebuilt in the 14th and 15th...

    more
  • THE CASTLE BARGE

    Guess what the Castle Barge is?The Castle Barge is Newark's famous floating pub!This old grain barge, built in 1923, was converted into its present form in 1980. Serves typical bar food daily although the range is small (small galley), it is reasonable value. It is open from 10.30 till late, and has an outdoor sitting areaThe pub is situated just...

    more
  • RIVERSIDE PARK

    This was our first stop in Newark, the Riverside Park located alongside the River Trent.A large park and display car-park was located here, and Toilet's. The park is a large lawned area, from where we had a great view of the Castle from the waterfront. This park is used for a lot of the Town event's, such as music concerts, food fairs, funfairs and...

    more
  • St Mary Magdalene

    A large and airy Medieval church, right in the centre of Newark, with many interesting bits and pieces within.Dating from the 1400s, with gargoyles and architectural twiddles on the outside.Inside, brasses and Medieval stone carvings, misericords and choir stall woodwork from the early 1500s, a very early crypt (may be inaccessible), chantry...

    more
  • Mary Magdalen Church

    Around 1180 is the first time that this Norman church is first mentioned, but only the crypt is still left from that time. There are however the remains of an earlier Saxon church underneath this one too, so the place has long been sacred. The glory days for the church was around 1220, but up until the 15th century it was expanded here and there...

    more
  • Newark Castle

    A Saxon king built a fortress along the river here and it is quite easy to see why the location was chosen, and the castle in its heydays was called the "Key of the North". In 1073, when Newark still belonged to Lincolnshire, the Bishop of Lincoln took it over and started the building of a castle, which was then improved and continued in Norman...

    more
  • Millgate Museum

    Housed in an old oil-seed mill on the banks of the River Trent, this museum houses a variety of objects.It's free to enter, but the various floors are only accessed by stairs...so no use at all for anyone with a disability.When I visited I didn't stay long, because there was a large and noisy group visiting at the same time.Next time, I'll explore...

    more
  • Go for a riverside walk.

    The riverside has been improved and sorted out over the past few years, and is a really nice place to go for a walk.Excellent views of the castle, of course, but the river frontages and locks are also interesting.A most pleasant place to spend an hour or two, maybe with a picnic.....as long as the weather is kind!

    more
  • The castle.

    You can't really miss Newark castle.Standing right by the river Trent, with superb views across the flat countryside surrounding Newark, it must once have been a most impressive sight.Its construction began in 1123.In 1645, after the surrender of Newark (a Royalist stronghold) in the English Civil War the town defences were destroyed. this included...

    more
  • Antiques fair.

    Newark showground is situated just outside the town, over the other side of the A1.It is home to a series of events throughout the year, but it is most well known for the annual international Antiques fair. With 4,000 stalls they claim that it is the largest fair in Europe. This year (2007) it will be on April 5th and 6th. Entry is quite steep at...

    more
  • Air Museum

    There is an Aeroplane museum just outside Newark, at the former RAF base. I tried to visit recently, but my wife didn't understand. Despite the fact it would have made my 2-year old's days pointing at various aircraft and shouting 'plane, plane', we had to look at poncy gifty / crafty shops in Newark instead.The Air museum contains a selection of...

    more

Newark upon Trent Restaurants

  • One of Newark's pubs.

    I only went into one pub, and this was it.The Hobgoblin is on the main Market Square, in an timber-framed building.Inside there are proper blackened beams, and a flagstoned floor, and wooden tables.It serves real ale (Wychwood).The Camra guide suggests it caters mainly for younger people, and certainly the television and loud music inside gave that...

    more
  • Books, coffee, sandwiches.......CAKE!

    Strays is a rather good bookshop, and has a cafe attached.Long and thin, with newspapers available to read, it is clearly very popular with locals. There is a small courtyard area with tables (and a gazebo/tent thing too, because it is the UK and one can never be sure of the weather).There is a wide variety of sandwiches and panini available, good...

    more
  • Excellent value!

    This is a friendly restaurant that operates from 9.00am until 5.00pm. It serves an all-day breakfast and light snacks (sandwiches, jacket potatoes, etc.), teas/coffees. However, the real plus is that during the times when the Palace Theatre (on the opposite side of the street) has performances, it offers a pre-theatre dinner. This is a set menu of...

    more

Newark upon Trent Transportation

  • Train hub

    Getting to Newark is easy by train since it is along the main line between London and the North of England. Not all main line trains stop here, but enough of them for you to be spontaneous. They stop at Newark North Gate which has a top part of the station along the main line, and a crossing line to for instance Lincoln a bit further down some...

    more
  • 2 Rail stations

    My Grandfather was (I think I am right in saying this) a signalman in Newark during the Second world war. As such he no doubt had a very responsible job to manage the main line connecting Edinburgh to London and the local lines that stop closer to town at the 'Castle Station'.Newark Northgate is on the main line, and that means there are loads of...

    more
  • Newark upon Trent Hotels

    0 Hotels in Newark upon Trent

Newark upon Trent Shopping

  • sourbugger's Profile Photo

    by sourbugger Updated Apr 3, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    My wife says this shop is excellent. There was also a natty little little coffee/ tea shop at the back.

    I normally try and close my eyes in such places and put myself in a different 'mind environment' until she who must be obeyed says it is time to leave.

    On the other hand, my 2-year old son thought the place was great for two reasons :

    1) He thought it was called 'ambulance'

    2) The lady in the shop gave him a little chocolate egg.

    Was this review helpful?

    more

Newark upon Trent Local Customs

  • by JHChrist Written Jul 21, 2006

    It has been my observation that the people of Newark Upon Trent have a strange fascination for what they call 'Sweet Meats'. I sampled some of this local delicacy in one of the many Pubs in the Market area and was pleasantly surpised by both the taste and the texture of the meat. It was indeed sweet and had the texture and consistency of slightly undercooked fillet steak.

    I tried to discover what this 'sweetmeat' actually was but, everytime I asked someone, I would be met with either a blank expression or a shrug of the shoulders. So, I removed a small piece and gave it to my wife who happens to work for the forensics department of our local Police force. Imagine my surprise when i was told that this 'sweetmeat' was actually the young and tender flesh of the locally inbred children of Newark!

    Naturally, I assumed that this discovery would necessitate a huge Police operation in Newark but, weeks passed and there was no word, nothing in the papers...silence. Eventually, I confronted my wife about it. She simply said "Well, the police don't want to interfere darling, it seems that crime rate has halved. Keeps the number of chavs & the pikeys down too."

    I had to agree. So, If you visit Newark anytime soon, I suggest you do the community a favour and try some of the local sweetmeat

    Was this review helpful?

    more

Newark upon Trent Warnings and Dangers

  • sourbugger's Profile Photo
    your my bestest freind you are....

    by sourbugger Written Apr 3, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Like most mid-sized town throughout England, there is a culture of heavy drinking on Friday and Saturday nights.

    Newark is no exception. It's not Mansfield (best avoided at all times) but the town centre is liberally packed with bars and pubs to keep the local populace happy.

    I like the story of the 'Ossington Coffee house' - built 1882. This splendid building was built on the Great North Road opposite the Castle. The Great North road now by-passes the town, but the building remains. The owners thought they could tempt local farmers away from the 'Demon drink' - but to no avail. Rather ironically the building now houses (in part) a pub that is mentioned in the local good beer guide !

    Related to:
    • Beer Tasting

    Was this review helpful?

    more

Newark upon Trent Off The Beaten Path

  • Church door.

    It would be easy to miss this. The only reason I spotted it was because I tried to get into the church through the street-facing door (access is actually at the side).An ancient wooden door, the western entrance to st Mary Magdalene (the unmissable church in the centre of Newark).....and look how someone in the far-distant past has, very...

    more
  • Half-and-half font

    The font in St Mary Magdalene is very odd.It dates originally from the 15th century (1400s) but was damaged during the English Civil War (1642-1649). In 1660 a local tailor, Nicholas Ridley, paid for it to be repaired.This resulted in the figures having their original 15th century clothing on their lower halves, and typical mid-1600s clothing on...

    more
  • Ask a Question

    Got a question about Newark upon Trent? Get an answer from our Location locals and frequent travelers

Instant Answers: Newark upon Trent

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

97 travelers online now

Comments

 
Explore Deeper into Newark upon Trent
Market Place
Things to Do
Civil War Trail.
Things to Do
The River Trent
Things to Do
Newark castle.
Things to Do
Great Pizza!
Restaurants
Map of Newark upon Trent

View all Newark upon Trent hotels