Fun things to do in Nottinghamshire

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Nottinghamshire

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    Edwinstowe

    by suvanki Updated Nov 19, 2012

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    This is the village at the heart of Sherwood Forest.
    It has quite a charm, despite being a tourist magnet

    It is also the village where I spent my teenage years, and my parents still live here, so I get to visit quite frequently.

    The Major Oak, Sherwood Forest and Saint Marys Church are the main attractions for visitors.The nearby Centreparcs 'holiday village' provides accomodation with activities in a forest setting.

    Along the High Street and Church Street (The 2 main streets for visitors) are a number of gift shops, pubs, restaurant /cafes etc.

    The area around the cricket pitch, has a newly opened Art & Craft centre, and an eco-friendly YHA. During the summer there's a small funfair.(it closes at the end of September/beginning of October to move to the legendery Nottingham Goose Fair) At weekends you can witness a 'village cricket match' amongst the scenery of the forest.

    Please visit my Edwinstowe page for more information about Sherwood Forest and surrounding areas

    Edwinstowe, Church Street
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  • eddilowe's Profile Photo

    Creswell Crags

    by eddilowe Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Creswell Crags is a pretty limestone gorge with a small lake. The footpath around the lake is nice and flat and a pleasant short walk on a nice day. You would need no longer than an hour to amble round. On a still day you can get some nice photos of the reflections of the cliffs on the water.

    Stone tools and remains of animals have been found in the caves dating them from the last Ice Age. It is apparently home to Britain's only known Ice Age rock art. The openings to the caves themselves are blocked with metal grills in order that the archaeology inside remains intact.

    There is an activity trail round the gorge and leaflets are available from the gift shop. There is a museum and eduction centre down a path at one end of the gorge. The car park is also located here. We did not go inside as it looked quite busy but it looked interesting.

    You can go on certain cave tours (a party in mining helmets with lights on were just heading towards the gorge as we were leaving). I believe there is a charge for the cave tour but the museum/learning centre and gorge can be accessed free of charge.

    There is a small field between the gorge and the learning centre suitable to sit and have a picnic. There were a few picnic tables. There are information boards lining the path from the centre to the gorge charting the history from the Ice Age.

    The website has lots of info and the "Virtually the Ice Age" section accessed from the home page is very interesting.

    Well worth a visit, but try to pick a fairly nice day so you can enjoy the walk.

    There are several other gorges and cave sites around the Creswell Heritage area which is in the Meden Valley.

    Creswell Crags lake Creswell Crags cliffs A swan by the lake
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    • Archeology
    • National/State Park

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  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Eakring - Plague village connection

    by suvanki Updated Feb 16, 2008

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    Dating back to the Domesday Book, St Andrews Church, Eakring is worth a visit for those interested in church architecture.
    The main structure of the church dates back to the 13th century- the tower is 13th century at its top, with a 15th century base. Over the centuries the church has been much restored.

    Of interest , William Mompesson, born in Scarborough, then working as a chaplain and curate in nearby Rufford then Wellow, was then sent to Eyam in Derbyshire, where a year after he arrived (1665) bubonic plague caused the death of over 260 villagers, including his wife.

    Mompesson remained in Eyam, working to halt the plague, by isolating villagers, thereby preventing spread to neighbouring villages.

    Remarrying, he returned to Nottinghamshire, to the parish of Eakring.

    Locals were afraid of contacting the plague, which led to him conducting services in a field outside Eakring, he was also forced to live in a hut at Rufford.

    A stone cross marks the site of his outside services.

    Mompesson remained as Rector of Eakring for 38 years, 'til his death in 1708.

    St Andrews Church, Eakring
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  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Eakring - Oil Fields!

    by suvanki Updated Feb 16, 2008

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    Eakring is an attractive North Nottinghamshire village, red roofed houses, surrounded by wide sweeping fields, and forest land.

    About 2 miles outside Eakring is Dukes Wood- This was the site of UK's first Commercial Oil Field! On 26/3/1939 the well was spudded, and carried on production until 1978.

    By 1964 it had produced 47 million barrels of oil- before North Sea Oil fields had even been drilled!
    Check out the website below for more info about Eakrings Oil Industry and museum

    Eakring Coutryside
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  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Ollerton

    by suvanki Updated Feb 16, 2008

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    Ollerton village was originally known as Alreton or Allerton which meant Farm among the Alders!
    Alder trees can still be seen today lining the River Maun which flows through the village.

    Ollerton developed as a village due to its location, originally on the York to London Road ( now by - passed) but continues to link the Newark to Worksop and Lincoln to Mansfield roads.

    Inns were established to serve the stage coaches (The Hop Pole and White Hart Inns still serve food and drink and provide accommodation to travellers)

    Ollerton is now divided into 2 areas The old village, and New Ollerton which developed with the coal mining industry, bringing shops, housing estates and schools. Despite the closure of the pit (A Tesco supermarket now operates on the site ) and subsequent mass unemployment in the area, Ollerton still survives.

    Off the busy Ollerton roundabout is an area known as Forest Corner, with car parking and a tourist Information Office, where You can pick up books and leaflets about the area and things to do around Ollerton and Nottinghamshire. There are some nature walks etc around here.

    The old watermill is worth visiting, as is its award winning tearooms.

    On a personal note, I went to School in Ollerton between 1971 and 77.

    At the time I didn't appreciate the charm of the village - except it's where I did my illegal underage drinking!!!

    Old Ollerton, North Notts
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  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Wellow - Maypole

    by suvanki Updated Feb 16, 2008

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    The village of Wellow is probably most famous for its Maypole. This is the tallest permanent maypole in England, standing at 55ft high, topped by a cockral weather vane.

    Originally made of wood, provided by the Saville family, who resided at their Rufford Estate, the present pole was erected in 1976 and is made of steel.

    The Maypole stands on the village green, and each May Day is decorated with coloured ribbons, which become intertwined as local village girls and boys dance around the pole.
    This tradition may have originated as a celebration of the arrival of summer, and may date back to pagan times!

    From 12 mid day until late afternoon the festivities continue with Morris dancing, dog shows, side stalls and the crowning of the May Queen.
    These celebrations were common throughout villages in England, but why they have died out elsewhere and continued so strongly in Wellow is considered to be a mystery!

    Also worth seeing in Wellow are the Church of St Swithin, Ancient earthworks, and the 2 pubs (Durham Ox - 17th C coaching Inn, and Red Lion) - more info re these to follow shortly!

    Wellow is a pretty conservation village, probably most peoples idea of a traditional English village. There are no souvenir shops or 'Olde Worlde' tea rooms here either!!

    Please see my Edwinstowe page (off the beaten tack tips ) for more info.

    Wellow Maypole
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    Collecting Royal Crown Derby

    by Plendil Updated Nov 22, 2005

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    Collecting Royal Crown Derby

    I know alot of people out there collect this stuff (my mother is an avid collector of Crown Derby pottery) so if you are interested to know, there is a visitors centre located in the city of Derby.

    There is a factory tour which lasts about 2 hours and includes a demonstration of how the pottery is made and also a tour of the museum. There is a web site for more information.

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    Historic Newstead Abbey,...

    by Plendil Updated Nov 22, 2005

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    Historic Newstead Abbey, former home of the poet Lord Byron.

    A great place for a picnic in the summer months. Lots of information about Lord Byron can be found here(admission charges apply for the house and gardens.)

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  • eddilowe's Profile Photo

    Clumber Park

    by eddilowe Updated Aug 16, 2005

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    Clumber park is 3800 acres of peaceful woods, open heath, farmland, a lovely lake and the longest avenue of lime trees in Europe.

    Clumber was part of Nottinghamshire's 'Dukeries', formerly home to the Dukes of Newcastle. The main house was demolished in 1938. This link shows the house as it stood on the banks of the lake. From the picture, only the church now remains which is quite amazing. Funny to think I've stood where the house would've been.....Also still surviving are the entrance gate, walled kitchen garden, glass houses and stableyard also still stands.

    There is a shop and restaurant and plenty of parking. If you take a dog it must be kept on a lead.

    The estate village of Hardwick is actually older than the park itself. It is located at the NE end of the lake.

    Check with the park prior to your visit for opening times as it varies. There are also occassional days when they hold big concerts and the park is closed to all visitors other than those who have concert tickets.

    Admission
    Vehicle entry charge: £4 per car
    £5.20 car + caravan, minibus, car + trailer
    Walled kitchen garden: £1, children free.

    We went in October as all the leaves on the trees were turning and it was very pretty. We had a walk round the grounds, went to the walled gardens (which I didn't have high hopes for but actually really enjoyed) and drove round Hardwick village.

    If you want to stay in the area there is the 3 star Clumber Park Hotel located on the A614.

    There is also a campsite which is run by the Caravan Club

    Greek Temple across Clumber Lake
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  • eddilowe's Profile Photo

    Marvel at the Major Oak

    by eddilowe Updated Aug 1, 2005

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    No-one really knows how old this grand old tree is, in the heart of Sherwood Forest. Estimates range from 800-1000 years old.

    Somewhere I have a photograph of me sitting inside the major Oak's hollow trunk when I was a little girl. Nowadays visitors are kept away by a fence in a bid to protect the trees roots.

    Legend has it that Robin Hood used to hide from his enemies inside the oak and the church where Robin married Maid Marion is located nearby.

    Sherwood Forest Country Park is open 7 days a week 10am-5pm. Free admission although seasonal parking charges apply. There is plenty of car parking, visitor centre, shop, refreshments, toilets and walking trails.

    The Major Oak
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    See the animals

    by eddilowe Written Jul 20, 2005

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    White Post Farm Centre

    Wonderful place for anyone of any age to get close to the animals. It is open daily from 10am

    PRICES VALID FROM 1st March 2005

    Adults: £7.00
    Senior Citizens: £6.25
    Children (3-16): £6.25
    Children under 3 : FREE
    Adults/Children with special needs: £6.30 - £5.65

    (Children under 16 must be accompanied by an adult)

    Groups of 10 or more, all paying - 10% discount.

    Lambs - Ahhhhhhhhh
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    Newstead Abbey

    by stevezero Written Feb 28, 2005

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    Here is another place recently revisted that brings back memories of my youth.
    Newstead Abbey is an historic building set in large landscaped gardens that is well worth a visit. Not too far from nottingham, it is an oasis of tranquility.
    The abbey dates back to the 12thC, and is perhaps best known as being the ancestral home of one Lord Byron, the poet.
    He sold the house to a frien in 1818 and the house remained a family home until 1931, when it was donated to the city of Nottingham for the enjoyment of all (though you still have to pay for entry into the grounds and more for the abbey itself)

    Newstead Abbey Gardens are open daily from 9.00 am until dusk, except for the last day in November and Christmas Day when the Park is closed.

    Newstead Abbey House is open 1 April - 30 September, 12:00pm - 5:00 pm
    (last admission 4:00 pm)

    Adult, Park only £2.00

    Newstead Abbey, Nottingham
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    17 Chapel Street

    by stevezero Updated Feb 28, 2005

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    This is probably one for cricket fans only.
    The house is the birthplace of the famous Notts and England bowler Harold Larwood who was born here in 1904.
    Harold left school at 14, to work in the local mine, playing cricket for the village team at weekends.
    His talents were soon spotted, and he went on to play for county and country. He is most famous, for the "bodyline bowling " tour of Australia in the 1930's

    The house bears a plaque to honour Larwood, but the house is now a private residence and not a museum, so is visible from the outside only.

    Harold Larwood's Birthplace
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    Nottingham Castle is worth a...

    by barryg23 Written Sep 8, 2002

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    Nottingham Castle is worth a visit. By the time i got to visit the Castle it had closed for the day. Nevertheless i did get a photo and on my next visit hopefully i'll see the Castle. The leaflet I picked up on the Castle at the tourist office had information in French, German, Spanish and Japanese. (Do they not expect English speaking visitors?? hehe). Anyway, assuming i translated this correctly, the Castle was initially built in 1068 but is today an impressionist manor of the 17th Century.
    An exhibition of the life and art of Andy Warhol was taking place at the time of my visit. I'm not a big fan of Warhol or his art but he did have his 15 minutes of fame 'producing' that Velvet Underground album.

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    Castle of Nottingham, a centre...

    by Pavlik_NL Written Sep 8, 2002

    Castle of Nottingham, a centre of the legends around Robin Hood and then the seat of the evil Sheriff of Nottingham. Now-a-days the castle doesn't look evil at all, with it's beautiful park and the expositions that are held inside. In Nottingham is also the Robin Hood-experience. This is a nice attraction that shows you all you want to know about the hero that stoole from the rich to give to the poor.

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Nottinghamshire Things to Do

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