Bodleian Library, Oxford

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    Divinity School

    by evaanna Updated Dec 29, 2006

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    Entrance to Divinity School

    Part of the Bodleian Library, the Divinity School is the oldest university building, built in 1420-83 specially for lectures and discussions on theology. As you enter it, but not by the entrance in the picture, which is for professors only, look up and admire its wonderful vaulted ceiling with hundreds of bosses and about a hundred crests of the founders on its walls - a masterpiece of English Perpendicular Gothic architecture. One of the treasures kept there is a chair made of the original wood from the ship of Sir Francis Drake.
    The door at the School's far end leads to the Convocation House where Cromwell's Parliament met in 1681. The room, with its beautifully carved benches, immediately looked familiar to me when my friend and library guide showed us in. Yet, I was sure I had never been there before. The solution to this mystery was simple: I remembered the place from 'The Madness of King George', which I had watched three times. The Divinity School itself also features in 'To Kill a King' and, as the Hogwarts sanatorium, in 'Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone'.
    Above the Divinity School is the magnificent Duke Humfrey Library named after Henry V's brother and built in the years 1439 - 1489. Unfortunately, I only visited the place on my first visit to Oxford and without a camera. When we were there last July it was Saturday afternoon, too late for it to be still open.

    Open: weekdays - 9 am.- 5 pm., Saturdays - 9 am.- 12.30

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    The Clarendon Building

    by evaanna Updated Nov 19, 2006

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    The Clarendon Building
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    Built in 1711 - 1713 to the design of Nicholas Hawksmoor, a pupil of Christopher Wren's, this imposing, if rather heavy, building was to house the Oxford University Press, which until then had its quarters in the basement of the Sheldonian Theatre. The place takes its name from the Earl of Clarendon, author of 'The History of the Great Rebellion', whose son presented the University with its copyright. The proceeds from its publication partly paid for the construction of the building. The interesting statue in the niche of the first floor on the west side is that of Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon.
    The building was used successively as the university printing house, university police station and the offices of the Registrar. It is now part of the Bodleian Library.

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    Clarendon Building

    by martin_nl Updated Oct 15, 2004

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    Bodleian Library

    The Clarendon building is yet another building on Radcliffe Square. Well actually the main entrance is on Broad Street, but still the backside looks marvelous too and is a great addition to the square. It's unbelievable that all these nice buildings belong to a Library.

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    Bodleian Library

    by ultchuk Updated Jul 13, 2004

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    Bodleian Library

    All of Oxford is university. Everywhere you look. A very famous building is the Bodleian Library. On the pic you see only a part of it, the entrance building. The Bodleian Library was built around 1600.

    Because of the incalculable value of the Library’s books, two very strict policies were enforced from the very beginning. The first was that books must never leave the library. The other policy was that no fire may be brought into the library buildings.

    Inside the library the opening scenes of Harry Potter (the Hall when the new wizzies are accepted) were taken.

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    Bodleian Library

    by martin_nl Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Bodleian Library

    On Radcliffe Square you will find the Old Schools Quadrangle, the oldest building of the Bodeian Library. Other buildings on this square that are part of the Bodeian Library are Duke Humfrey's Library above the Divinity School, the Radcliffe Camera, and the Clarendon Building.

    The tower that is part of the Quadrangle is amazing. It's called the Tower of Five Orders and is named so because on top of the tower are five ornamented columns and each of them is one of the five orders of classical architecture, Doric, Tuscan, Ionic, Corinthian and Composite.

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    Divinity School

    by martin_nl Updated Oct 15, 2004

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    Divinity School

    If you enter the Quadrangle of the Bodleian Library and continue onwards you enter the Divinity School. A very nice old church like interior. Alex posed here and I must say she looks an awful lot like a younger, blonder version of Cherrie Blair. A lot prettier too ;)) If you look through the windows on your right from when you entered the School you can see the Sheldonian Theatre.

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    The Bod I - General Facts

    by King_Golo Updated Feb 8, 2014

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    Bodleian Library

    The Bodleian Library, or Bod as everybody calls it, is the biggest and most important library of Oxford. It owns roughly 9 million (!) books which makes it the second-largest library in Great Britain.

    Opened in 1602 as the successor of a smaller library which was located on the premises of the University Church of St. Mary the Virgin, the Bod had quite a rough start. Its oldest part, Duke Humphrey's library from 1488, wasn't finished for years due to financial problems. 50 years after it had eventually opened, many of its books were destroyed: King Edward VI wanted all reminders of Roman Catholicism in England to be purged. It wasn't until 1602 that the library came to success again. Thomas Bodley, a rich Fellow of Merton College, donated the money to have it built and expanded. For this reason, the Bod itself is "only" 400 years old, but parts of it are older. Quite soon, the huge amount of books needed to be monitored and registered. In order to ensure the first, the most valuable books were chained to the shelves. In order to achieve the latter, the library introduced the world's first library catalogue in 1605, which by 1620 already listed 675 pages of books! This number grew continuously, also due to an agreement with publishing companies that made the Bod receive one copy of every book published in the UK.

    Nowadays, the Bod is the most important library of Oxford and is used by numerous scholars from all over the world, all of which have to swear the following oath prior to using it: "I hereby undertake not to remove from the Library, nor to mark, deface, or injure in any way, any volume, document or other object belonging to it or in its custody; not to bring into the Library, or kindle therein, any fire or flame, and not to smoke in the Library; and I promise to obey all rules of the Library."

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    The Bod II - Points of interest

    by King_Golo Updated May 7, 2010

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    Divinity School

    Most people visit the Bodleian Library as part of a tour. I have never done that, but as a university member was able to get a glimpse of Duke Humphrey's Library and the Divinity School.
    The former is the oldest part of the Bodleian Library, dating back to 1488. It is here that the visitor can feel the heavy omnipresence of knowledge best: Books, books, books - everywhere! Duke Humphrey's Library consists of ceiling-high storage racks with massive, leather-bound volumes of old books. Dark wood, the ceiling covered with the coat of arms of Thomas Bodley, and a librarian that looks nearly as old as the volumes he takes care of - everything forms one image.
    The latter, Divinity School, is even a little bit older. Begun in 1424, but opened only in 1483, it was used as a lecture theatre for the theologists. Imagine listening to a lecture here, under its lierne vaulting (which looks like a Gothic fan vaulting)! The interior is so impressive that film-producers couldn't resist filming here: In "Harry Potter", the room was used both as the hospital wing and the ballroom lectures classroom. Duke Humphrey's Library was used as Hogwarts Library.
    Standard tours through the Bod cost £ 6,50 and take 60 minutes, extended tours take 90 minutes (and probably cost more, but I couldn't find the price on the website). The Divinity School is the only part that can be visited without a tour - the entrance fee is £ 1.

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    The Bodleian Library

    by KennetRose Written Jun 4, 2003

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    One of six copyright libraries entitled to receive a free copy of any book published in Britain (I'm choosing my words carefully here). The others are the British Library, Cambridge University Library, the National Library of Wales in Aberystwyth, the National Library of Scotland in Edinburgh, and the Library of Trinity College Dublin. Incidentally the final comma in that last sentence, separating the final two items in a list, I included deliberately even though it's not normally part of my preferred writing style. It's called an Oxford comma. There - don't say you don't learn new things from my pages!

    The library was opened in 1602, endowed by Sir Thomas Bodley. Bodley was a Calvinist whose parents took him to Geneva to bring him up away from the brutal repression of the Roman Catholic Church. In Philip Pullman's story Geneva is a place rich in intriguing ambiguity - in our universe a centre for particle physics, but in Lyra's universe, where John Calvin has become Pope and removed the seat of the papacy to Geneva before the abolition of the position on his death, it is the seat of the all-powerful Magisterium (the Church). Presumably in Lyra's Oxford Bodley would have had nothing to fear (but see my note on the Martyrs' Memorial). There it becomes 'Bodley's Library' and amongst other things is the repository for the learned books associated with the alethiometer, and one assumes the place where Lyra will investigate the mysterious "Dust" so that "eventually she would know more about Dust than anyone in the world

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    The most beautiful

    by solopes Updated Feb 19, 2013

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    Oxford - UK

    Oxford has several libraries, but Bodleian library, for its history and architecture, is the most remarkable (and visited!).

    Since the 16Th century it is open to the students , inheriting a collection coming from the 13Th century, and rescued from dispersion by Sir Thomas Bodley, whose name was given to the library built from the day after his death.

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  • Bodleian Library

    by sabsi Written Apr 27, 2003

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    Bodleian Library

    A beautiful building full of books! I read somewhere that there are 6.5 million books here actually. I guess that's why this building is so huge - although there is an underground tunnel system full of books even!

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    Bodleian Library...

    by coceng Updated Aug 3, 2004

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    Bodleian Library, Oxford

    Oxford was a Saxon town at a point where River Cherwell meets The Thames.
    The first college was built in the 13th century & one of them was called 'university'.
    Today, there are 39 colleges spreading over Oxford.
    My photo is showing one small entrance to The Bodleian Library, also in the same area as St. Mary's Church, Radcliffe Camera & All Souls College.
    This is NOT the main entrance.
    The Bodleian Library, known to Oxford scholars as 'The Bod', opened in 1602 with a collection of 2000 books, assembled by Thomas Bodley.
    Today, the Bodleian includes several off-site storage areas as well as nine other libraries in Oxford :The Bodleian Japanese Library
    The Bodleian Law Library
    The Hooke Library
    The Indian Institute Library
    The Oriental Institute Library
    The Philosophy Library
    The Radcliffe Science Library
    The Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies at Rhodes House
    The Vere Harmsworth Library The sites now contain 9 million items on 176 km of shelving, and have seats for 2,500 readers.

    Oxford students must swear not to borrow or set fire to any books when they join 'The Bod'.

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    Quadrangle of Bodleian Library

    by slothtraveller Updated Jun 10, 2008

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    Bronze Statue in Quadrangle

    The Bodleian Library dates from the early 17th century and is unlike other libraries because books cannot be taken away from the premises. Reading rooms are only open to members, not the general public.
    The historic heart of the Bodleian Library is found in Radcliffe Sq. Here you can take a guided tour of the library or simply walk around the Old Schools quad where there is a bronze statue of the Earl of Pembroke, a Chancellor of the University in the 1600's.

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    To Bask In One Of Literary World's Heaven

    by Gwenvar Updated Feb 10, 2007

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    First Classroom of Oxford University
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    Right on Radcliff Square there is a certain heaven, that is if you are enamoured of books and of history like I absolutly am. It is called the Bodleian Library. It counts for 8 million items on 117 miles of shelving (not counting the ones that are stored outside, for lack of room), a staff of 400 and amongst the rest, has 3 underground floors where most of the documents are kept, and where only members of staff can go. If you want an item, first of all you have to be either a Reader (anyone can apply with good reason) or a Student at the university, then you send your request through a vacuum tube, a librarian gets it, looks for it and sends it on a conveyor belt to the exact library room in which you are waiting for it. Phew! Well, it is the second biggest library in all of the UK after the British Library , after all! Click here to know more about the Bodleian Library and it's history.

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    Bodleian Library...

    by coceng Updated Aug 3, 2004

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    Bodleian Library, Oxford

    Oxford was a Saxon town at a point where River Cherwell meets The Thames.
    The first college was built in the 13th century & one of them was called 'university'.
    Today, there are 39 colleges spreading over Oxford.
    I didn't exactly go in to see the books inside the library, just being in the 'square' inside the bodleian Library; CHILDREN UNDER 14 ARE NOT ALLOWED TO ENTER THE LIBRARY...
    My photo is showing the bronze statue of William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke...

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