Much Wenlock Things to Do

  • The view from Majors Leap, Wenlock Edge
    The view from Majors Leap, Wenlock Edge
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  • Looking south from Wenlock Edge
    Looking south from Wenlock Edge
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  • Olypian Trail marker
    Olypian Trail marker
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Most Recent Things to Do in Much Wenlock

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    Wenlock Edge

    by Andrew_W_K Written Jan 9, 2010
    The view from Majors Leap, Wenlock Edge
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    Wenlock Edge is a ridge of limestone that runs 15 miles from Much Wenlock to Craven Arms. At the highest point it is 330 metres above sea level, not high but as the ridge overlooks flattish countryside to the north it is very immpressive.
    It is a popular place for walkers and ramblers at weekends and there are car parks provided in Much Wenlock and on the summit. There are signposted trails that criss-cross the edge.
    There is a very good pub on the summit called the Wenlock Edge Inn that serves good food as well as beer.
    The most popular spot is Majors Leap where there is a sheer drop off the top of the edge and where a major in the kings army during the civil war is supposed to have gone over being chased by the Roundheads. Legend has it that he survived by clinging to the branches of the trees but I suppose his horse had no such luck.

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    • Hiking and Walking

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    Wenlock Priory

    by Andrew_W_K Written May 3, 2009

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    Fine stone carving in the chapter house
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    The ruins of Wenlock Priory are among the most romantic ruins in England. Originally a Saxon monastery the ruins we see today are from the Norman rebuilding that took place in the 12th century. The priory became redundant after the reformation as did many others including nearby Buildwas abbey. Many of these ruined monastic buildings are now owned and administered by English Heritage as is Wenlock priory and there is a modest admission charge (about £3.60 for adults). There is an audio device included in the price of admission.
    The most stunning part of the ruins is the wall of the chapter house that dates from 1140 the detail of the stone carving is hugely impressive.
    There is a small gift shop on site with some remarkably good quality items for very reasonable costs. I loved the medieval style glass goblets and wished I'd have bought one now.

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    The Olympian Trail

    by Andrew_W_K Written May 3, 2009

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    Olypian Trail marker
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    When you tell people that the modern Olympic movement really began as a consequence of a rural doctor in the Shropshire town of Much Wenlock they nod and secretly think you are raving mad but it's actually true. Local resident Dr William Penny-Brooks instigated the first Olynpic games back in 1850 and can be regarded as the father of the modern Olympic movement. Eventually the games were to inspire others to organise the full international event we know today but the first of those wasn't until 1896. The town is rightly proud of it's Olympic connections and you can follow a well marked trial around the town that starts and ends at the museum in the town centre where there are plenty of exhibits from the town's Olympic games. The trail is 2,100 meters long and there are information boards en route that tell you a little more about the history of the games in Wenlock. Fittingly the trails passes through the church graveyard and past Dr William Penny-Brookes' last resting place.

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    Much Wenlock Priory

    by sandysmith Written Aug 24, 2008

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    Priory ruins
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    These spectacular ruins are the 12th & 13th century remains of a church and cloistral buildings belonging to the Cluniac Priory, now under the management of English Heritage. It is said to be the final resting place of St Milburga, the first Abbess, whose bones were found during rebuilding in 1101. Some of the best topiary of animals I have seen makes for a wonderful landscape amongst the ruins. A unusual monks wash house has some interesting carvings on it too. Admission price was £3.50 but this also includes an audio Tour which takes approximately 35 minutes. Well worth a visit and is within walking distance of the town - just 200 yards from the centre.

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    St Owen’s Well House

    by sandysmith Written Aug 24, 2008

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    St Owen���s Well House
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    Just off the high street is Back Lane and towards the end can be see a fine example of a cruck-frame house - St Owen’s Well House and in the wall on the outside of the house is St Owen’s well itself. Cruck frame means 2 matching curved beams that meet at the gabled end, this may be one of Wenlock’s oldest buildings.

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    Guildhall

    by sandysmith Updated Aug 24, 2008

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    Guildhall
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    The Guildhall is from the 16th century. The lower part houses a market now inside the market you can see some of the original borough signs which extended over 17 parishes. Upstairs are the council chambers which are still in regular use and the old court. Above the judge's chair you will see The Coat of Arms of Queen Elizabeth I (1589). This is open to the public seasonally.
    Have a look at the back of the Guildhall as well by walking along Church walk where lovely gardens and cottages can be enjoyed such as Church House yet another black and white timbered house.

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    Holy Trinity Church

    by sandysmith Written Aug 24, 2008

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    Holy Trinity Church

    Holy Trinity Church became the church of the parish around 1100 and the Cluniac monks from The Priory were said to responsible for much of the stonework. t was here that St. Milburga (Wenlock’s female saint and abbess of Wenlock Priory) was buried and later moved. Her remains are said to have been moved a number of times. She is reputed to have started the church for the women town folk and her nuns to attend services. Today family graves of the Brookes Family can be seen in the churchyard.

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    Talbot Inn

    by sandysmith Updated Aug 24, 2008

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    Opposite Raynauld's Mansion is the Talbot Inn which has been a lodging since 1361. It was called the Abbott's House, the Almoners , a pub for travellers and a centre for alms giving. The courtyard was a pleasant place to stop for some lunch and a drink here as we explored the town sights. At the back of the courtyard is a malt house - now converted to 6 en-suite rooms. The sandwiches here came with a generous portion of salad - really one plate between two would have been plenty.

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    Raynald’s Mansion

    by sandysmith Written Aug 24, 2008

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    High Street and Raynald���s Mansion
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    Just along from the Corn Exchange on the High Street is another interesting building - a plain timber frame Elizabethan building, Raynald’s Mansion, constructed 1682. Looked like it was being renovated inside for a fine furniture shop.

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    Corn Exchange and Library

    by sandysmith Written Aug 24, 2008

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    Corn Exchange
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    Along the high street in Much Wenlock are many interesting buildings. The Corn Exchange is just one of them, constructed in 1851, the building became an Agricultural Library shortly afterwards and is still used as the local public library. Above the market area you can read a plaque in memory to Dr William Penny Brookes and his many contributions to the townsfolk, placed on the building in 1897 in the 60th year of Queen Victoria’s reign on the throne.

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    Memorial Hall - Museum and Tourist Office

    by sandysmith Updated Aug 24, 2008

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    inside the museum
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    The memorial hall at the heart of the town centre is home to the town's tourist office - so a good place to start and pick up leaflets for local town walks and information. The museum is also housed here - free entrance and full of local information and history - especially with regard to being the birthplace of the modern Olympics so well worth a visit. The memorial hall also used to be a cinema and inside where the huge old cine projection equipment which I found fascinating.

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    Much Wenlock Museum

    by trvlrtom Written Jul 19, 2008

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    The museum has some interesting artifacts and memorabilia of the town. The Tourist Information Office is in the same building. Just outside their door is a map showing details of another Wenlock walk - the Olympian Trail which will guide you past points of interest relating to the origins of the modern Olympic games.

    You can follow the trail using the bronze plaques mounted in the pavement throughout the town and a leaflet is available from tourist information.

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    • Museum Visits
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    • Architecture

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    Raynald’s Mansion & High Street

    by trvlrtom Written Jul 19, 2008

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    Much Wenlock's High Street has several notable buildings. Raynald's Mansion stands out as a fine Elizabethan era half-timbered building. The Talbot Inn across the road has been a lodging since 1361. The courtyard has a malt house in the back. The black and white Barclays Bank was built in the 17th century and was an inn until the 1920's.

    There are some nice shops on the street. My wife went to a knitting shop and bought some fine wool. Guess who is getting a sweater for Christmas.

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    The Guildhall

    by trvlrtom Written Jul 19, 2008

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    Inside the guildhall

    The Guildhall is one of the finest Tudor buildings in the area. This grand half-timbered building, built in 1540, includes a council chamber and courtroom, lined with centuries old carved wood and intricate design work. The ground level is an open market, once common throughout Europe.

    In the courtroom there are several interesting artifacts. On display is a wheeled wood shackle, which I guess was convenient if they wanted to display felons in different parts of town. The Coat-of-Arms is that of Elizabeth I and is dated 1589 (the year of the defeat of the Spanish Armada).

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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Much Wenlock Things to Do

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