Architecture, Bath

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  • Inside St Michael's Without Church, Bath
    Inside St Michael's Without Church, Bath
    by spidermiss
  • St Michael's Without Church, Bath
    St Michael's Without Church, Bath
    by spidermiss
  • Inside St Michael's Without Church, Bath
    Inside St Michael's Without Church, Bath
    by spidermiss
  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    St Michael's Without Church

    by spidermiss Updated Jul 4, 2012

    The Gothic Church of St. Michael with St. Paul was built in 1837 (construction began in 1835) by C.P. Manners. This the 4th church to occupy this site, which goes back to the times of the Romans. Apparently, it was the first church on site had been built outside the city walls even this hasn't be verified.

    The church had undergone a renovation during 2006/7. Today, the church serves as a social function in the community where regular charity and social events are planned. There is also a cafe and a shop selling religious books and souvenirs. Visitors are welcome to look round and learn more about the church and its history. Please check out the
    website for further information.

    St Michael's Without Church, Bath Inside St Michael's Without Church, Bath Inside St Michael's Without Church, Bath
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    Hospital of St John the Baptist

    by Myfanwe Written Mar 14, 2010

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Around 1180 Bishop Reginald FitzJocelin founded the Hospital of St John the Baptist for the poor of Bath. The hospital was run by a master and brethren, with the help of 'two or three women, not noble but suitable ... who are willing and able to serve the infirm poor'.

    St John's was built by the Cross Bath, the infirm could then bathe in the mineral waters to soothe their aches and pains.

    Hospital of St John the Baptist Hospital of St John the Baptist
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    Window Tax

    by jo104 Updated Jun 26, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In Bath there are some clear examples of buildings with bricked up windows, which may have been affected by window tax. In 1696 this tax was created by William III & during a slump in the economy but this tax lasted until 1851.

    The tax was paid on a house which had more then 6 windows, so as a result many people bricked up the excess windows. In 1792 a person who had 7-9 windows would be made to pay 2 shillings & houses with 10-19 windows would be forced to pay 4 shillings. In 1825 the number of windows allowed pre-tax was increased to 8 (how very generous).

    Window tax was replaced by a tax called House Duty.

    6 windows

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    St Michael's with St. Paul’s Church

    by Airpunk Written Sep 9, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    North of the pedestrian zone, there is a neogothic church with the name of St. Michael's with St. Paul's. It is already the fourth building on this site, with the first dating dating back to the 10th century. Not much is known about this first structure and it is still uncertain why it was dedicated to St. Michael. Construction of the present building began in 1835 and in 1837, it was consecrated.

    Today, the church stands between two streets and close to a modern shopping center. It's impressive tower can be seen from many parts of the city.

    St. Michael's with St. Paul's
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    Obelisk in honour of the Prince of Orange

    by Airpunk Written Sep 7, 2006

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    During the time of Richard 'beau' Nash, Bath had a very prosperous period. Bath became a popular town among the rich and the beautiful of this time. Among them was also William VI., Prince of Orange who came to Bath to have his illness cured. The water from Bath's thermal fountains was said to heal almost everything - from rheumatism to asthma, from itches to deafness. At least, it seems that it cured the Prince of Orange, so that Richard Nash had an Obelisk erected for him in 1734. It was rebuilt in 1834, after it almost collapsed during the centuries. Today, it can be seen at a traffic island at Orange Grove, close to the abbey.

    Obelisk in honour of the Prince of Orange
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    Church of St. John the Evangelist

    by Airpunk Written Sep 5, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Close to the Abbey church, you will find another gothic beauty, the church of St. John the Evangelist. The tower, in decorated style, is one of the highest buildings in Bath and visible from almost everywhere. Unfortunately, I haven't found anything about the history of this roman catholic church. If someone can provide me further information, I would be grateful.

    Church of St. John the Evangelist Church of St. John the Evangelist Church of St. John the Evangelist
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  • Elodie_Caroline's Profile Photo

    Going back through time

    by Elodie_Caroline Written May 8, 2006


    I love old architecture, especially the Victorian, Edwardian and Georgian style. I've got to admit, the olde Tudor style does nothing whatsoever for me though, and anything with beams showing on the ceiling inside a building really puts me off, that belongs inside old pubs .

    Modern buildings just don't do it for me unless they have been specifically designed and built to fit in with the places that are already there.

    These old houses were along the side of the road as we were coming into the city of Bath, they are tall and quite pretty in thier own way. They reminded me of a bygone time and age, one that could never be recaptured again, unfortunately, of fortunately, whichever way you might see it or have lived in it? For instance, being rich and upper class in the old days would have been great fun! but to be from a poor household and be forced in to service, read - slavery, would have never worked for me, i would have ran away or at least told the owners to F.O.

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    The Holburne Gallery

    by iandsmith Updated Nov 16, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The haphazard purchases of the Scottish laird, Sir William Holburne, bequeathed in 1882, are confusedly housed in a grand eighteenth-century villa, too big for what it contains. What are worth seeing there are a Stubbs, a Zoffany and (although they are badly hung and subjectively selected) some of Holburne's Dutch pictures. Apart from these there are some local views by local painters, three mediocre portraits attributed to Gainsborough, and an accumulation of objects in china, glass and silver. The entrance fee, around four pounds at present, is ambitious for what is on display.
    Personally, I would repair to the tea rooms outside for more enjoyment.

    Architecture grand, art not so.
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  • WulfstanTraveller's Profile Photo

    Georgian Architecure

    by WulfstanTraveller Written Oct 29, 2004

    Bath is a very Georgian city, stemming from its boom in popularity during that period and the general boom of the mercantile and industrial businessmen in nearby Bristol and other parts of SW England at the same time. It thus possesses a rich array of Georgian architecture and street layouts.

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  • coceng's Profile Photo

    A Church With A High Tower...

    by coceng Updated Oct 7, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bath is hemmed by seven hills...It is a gorgeous town !
    Throughout The Middle Ages, Bath was served as an ecclesiastical centre & also a wool-trading town.
    Bath has some amazing architectures !
    This photo is a church with a high tower is one of them...It is called St. John's Roman Catholic Church.
    Seriously, this church tower is visible from any angle if you are in Bath, but nobody on VT would write anything about it !
    Even on the Internet, we couldn't find any infos on this church ! I wonder why...

    St. John's Catholic Church; Bath, England...
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    The Baptist Church...

    by coceng Updated Oct 6, 2004

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    Bath is hemmed by seven hills...It is a gorgeous town !
    Throughout The Middle Ages, Bath was served as an ecclesiastical centre & also a wool-trading town.
    This photo is The Baptist Church in Bath; Situated on Manvers Street...along the way to the train station.Read About This Church on HERE

    Bath, England...
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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Grand Bath Buildings

    by sue_stone Written Sep 21, 2004

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    Bath is full of amazing architecture. It is hard to stop taking photos of every new building you see.

    The Bath Abbey is one of those photo-inspiring structures, as was the Bath Spa building and numerous others.

    We merely gazed at the outside of these buildings this visit, we plan to return for a closer look one day soon.

    Bath Abbey
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  • tvor's Profile Photo

    Architecture

    by tvor Written May 5, 2003

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    If you enjoy architecture Bath is a wonderful city for wandering. there are fine examples of Georgian and Victorian architecture everywhere and there is the enormous Abbey as well, which dates to the 13th century with various restorations since then. The elegant circular square of 30 houses built in a circle on the King's Circus and the wide sweeping Royal Crescent who's houses now sell for over a million pounds.... The decorated plaster ceilings and astonishing crystal chandeliers of the Assembly rooms and the Pump Room... the stately Queen's Square... the wide streets and tiny squares hiding around corners... Walk around Bath and look up at the detailing around the windows and roofs.

    Royal Circus Guildhall Queen's Square
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    Richard Nash's Fancy

    by yooperprof Written Apr 29, 2003

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    The guiding mastermind behind much of Bath's beauty was the 18th century Architect Richard Nash. He was able to utilize the lovely yellowish limestone which abounds in the region, and designed with it buildings that combine stateliness with amusement. Bath was a "spa" - a place for "restoration" and revival: as much so in 200 C.E. as in 2000 C.E.

    Classical design for healing
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  • lou31's Profile Photo

    Take a walk around

    by lou31 Written Jun 12, 2005

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    Just walking around was a passtime in itself. The lovely architecture and buildings everywhere provide their own entertainment. The square is popular and a nice place to sit and rest awhile.

    People taking it all in.
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