Queens Square, Bath

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  • Queen Square, Bath
    Queen Square, Bath
    by spidermiss
  • Queen Square, Bath
    Queen Square, Bath
    by spidermiss
  • Queen Square, Bth
    Queen Square, Bth
    by toonsarah
  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    Queen Square

    by spidermiss Updated Jul 3, 2012
    Queen Square, Bath
    1 more image

    Designed by John Wood, the Elder, during the Georgian times in the 18th Century. Wood lived in one of the square's houses with its Palladian architecture. The square's obelisk was erected by Beau Nash in 1738. The area was affluent during the Georgian times but during World War II nearby buildings on the south side of the square were damaged or destroyed by Baedeker Blitz and lives were lost.

    The square has attracted events and recently, in 2011, Occupy Bath, an organisation addressing the social and economic global issues, occupied the square during the autumn.

    Related to:
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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    Visit the Bath's Needle

    by jusdenise93 Updated Jul 19, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Queen Square is the biggest square in Bath and hosts many events throughout the year, French markets, Italian Markets, with an annual event called Boules, a weekend where all the restaurants compete with each other,lots of fun, you can buy drink and food.

    Queen Square has the Beau Nash obelisk as well as a hotel ( the south side) and houses on the west side.

    The obelisk in Queen's Square, also called the Bath Needle was erected by Richard Nash to commemorate the visit of H.R.H. Frederick, Prince of Wales, and his royal consort in the year 1738.

    It's worth a stop as it is located on Gay Street, where you can also find the Jane Austen Centre and the Circus ( right at the top of the street).

    Related to:
    • Festivals
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Elegant Queen Square (no "s", VT!)

    by toonsarah Updated Mar 15, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Queen Square, Bth

    My hotel, the Francis, was on the south side of this elegant square so I had plenty of opportunities to admire its harmonious architecture. Designed by John Wood the Elder between 1729 and 1739 it was one of the first examples of Georgian architecture and set the tone for later developments such as the Royal Crescent and Circus.

    At the centre of the square is an obelisk erected by one of the city’s most famous residents, Richard, known as “Beau”, Nash, in tribute to the Prince of Wales. Incidentally, Nash is credited with turning Bath into the most fashionable resort in 18th century England. As “Master of Ceremonies” for the city he had extensive influence: he would meet new arrivals and judge whether they were suitable to join the select 500 to 600 people who sat at the centre of Bath society; match ladies with appropriate dancing partners at each ball; broker marriages, escort unaccompanied wives and regulate gambling by restraining compulsive gamblers or warning players against cardsharps.

    I was pleased to learn that my beloved Jane Austen stayed in Queen Square on one of her many visits to Bath, at no. 13, but less pleased to discover that this was one of several houses on the south side that was destroyed during a 1942 air-raid. It has since been restored, along with its neighbours, and now forms part of the Francis Hotel where I was staying.

    As the biggest square in Bath, Queen Square apparently hosts many events through the year, such as French and Italian Markets, but on a grey midweek afternoon in March it was relatively quiet as you can see.

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  • Queens Square - central if unexciting

    by EncumberedGourmet Written Aug 21, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Why is Queens Square famous? Presumably it's "location location location". It is fairly central, and you more or less have to drive through it to get from one side of Bath to the other - which makes it difficult for pedestrians. This is a shame because there is a very pretty (if tiny) park in the centre of the square. There are sometimes boules games here in summer, and once a year there is a french market with excellent foodstuffs. The Bath Park 'n Ride busses stop here, so it a logical starting place for many visits. Head down Quiet Street (southeast corner) to get to the real (pedestrianised) center of Bath/

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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