Roman Baths, Bath

114 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Evening reception at the Baths
    Evening reception at the Baths
    by toonsarah
  • Roman Baths
    by alza
  • Roman Baths
    by alza
  • alza's Profile Photo

    The most romantic buildings in Britain

    by alza Updated Jul 4, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It's a matter of taste, what "the most romantic buildings" anywhere can be... The Roman Baths and Temple of Aquae Sulis Minerva were voted "the most romantic buildings in Britain" by the Royal Institute of Royal Architects, in 2010. I have limited knowledge of Britain but even so... I agree with this description of the Roman Baths.

    A word about my pages: I travel on my own, usually following some inspiration. I might write about a famous site, if there's reason to do so. But I don't write my pages as travel guides. They are impressions and reflections on places seen, come to life with my photos. I do that because it makes me happy to wander aimlessly and just "be" somewhere else. Cheers!

    I was far from alone when I visited the Roman Baths but nothing deterred me from appreciating my time there. I had the audio-guide to inform me along the way and it was worth it -- well organised, easy to use. It offers good general info on the Baths + separate commentaries on selected attractions by Bill Bryson. I listened to a few of his but they seemed rather trivial to me. At the bronze head of Sulis Minerva (main photo), Bryson's comment was "Here's a famous statue but not of a woman I'd care to know. She's not that attractive and I would have no interest in meeting her for real." -- I stopped clicking on his commentaries after that one.

    It was sometimes difficult to know exactly where I was in the baths...Is this the steaming Great Bath now or the Frigidarium? ... I got lost along the way, maybe taking too many pics with camera and smartphone. I had a complete ticket and think that took me from the Roman Baths through the whole complex, including King's Bath. You go through the Roman Baths to see the King's Bath... I did follow the arrows.

    No matter, I loved it all, it's very atmospheric. Seeing it at night, all lit up, would be magical. I ended up in the Baths store, where I bought lots of souvenirs, many worth the trip. :-)

    First photo: Gilt bronze head of Sulis Minerva
    Second photo: Gorgon's head from Temple's pediment.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • annase's Profile Photo

    The world famous Roman Baths

    by annase Updated Apr 6, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I was wondering whether a visit to the Roman Baths would be an interesting place to visit, since the entrance can seem rather pricey and I didn't have time to find that much information what exactly was going to be in there well ahead. I almost decided not to go, but then realised that once I was in Bath, I might as well go - otherwise I'd be annoyed with myself afterwards.

    The decision turned out to be a really good one, since I really enjoyed the visit. The audio tour helped a lot, since you get a commentary about various things you see, but you don't have to listen to all the stuff on it, but you can pick and choose.

    There is a wealth of things to see once you're inside. The Great Bath is the centre piece of the Roman bathing establishment. However, there are many other excavated features that are about 6m below the modern street level. The main features of the museum include the mysterious hot spring that was thought to be sacred by the Romans (hence the name "Sacret Spring", and which feeds hot water to the Great Bath), a Roman temple, the bath house and finds from Roman Bath (such as the gilt bronze head of the goddess Sulis Minerva). You'll see things like the great Roman drain that carries water from the Spring and the Great Bath to the River Avon. Even after 2000 years it still performs its original purpose. The drain on the eastern side of the baths was lined originally with wooden boards which are still there!

    Definitely worth a visit.

    The Great Bath The Sacret Spring One of the forgotten baths in western side The gilt bronze head of the goddess Sulis Minerva The great Roman drain
    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    ROMAN BATHS - EARLY ROMAN PEOPLE

    by balhannah Updated Dec 28, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In the Museum was a display on the "People of Aquae Sulis"...The Roman name for Bath.

    It was interesting to see the objects, like the stone head of a Lady from the 1 A., and to see how different they look to us! This head was saved from a Tomb and was in very good condition.
    Look at the hairstyle, the style of the day back then, was it an "affro" in modern times?

    There is more, even a complete skeleton and lots of tombstones showing a large range of people who lived in this area and died in Roman Bath.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    ROMAN BATHS - PLUNGE POOLS

    by balhannah Updated Dec 28, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Don't be mislead when here, NOT ALL THE POOLS HAVE HOT WATER!

    The circular pool in my photo, is a 1.6 metre deep COLD plunge pool!

    A cold plunge bath was a feature of many Roman bath houses, but rarely on this scale!

    Into the hot pool, then the cold, brrrrr!!!!

    Cold plunge pool
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    ROMAN BATHS - THE TEMPLE

    by balhannah Updated Dec 28, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Temple at Bath is one of only two truly classical temples known from Roman Britain. It was the place where the cult statue of the goddess Sulis Minerva was housed.
    Not only is the ornamental pediment on display, but an animation of what it would have looked like long ago in Roman times!
    The pediment carries the image of a fearsome head carved in Bath stone and it is thought to be the Gorgon’s head, which was a powerful symbol of the goddess Sulis Minerva.

    The Temple
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    ROMAN BATH'S TERRACE

    by balhannah Updated Dec 28, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    What ever you do at the Baths, don't miss visiting "The Terrace."

    The Terrace overlooks the Great Bath and is lined with statues of Roman Governors of Britain, Roman Emperors and military leaders from 1894, and it is from here that you have the BEST VIEW OF THE GREAT BATH.

    The Roman Baths were discovered in the 19th century and cover a huge area, even extending under nearby streets and squares! The Statue's at the Baths were actually carved before the Roman Baths in 1897.

    View from the Terrace View from the Terrace View from the Terrace View from the Terrace View from the Terrace
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    ROMAN BATHS

    by balhannah Updated Dec 28, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is what I wanted to see, I had heard and read so much about them.

    We arrived at the entrance, paid our admission fee, were given a brochure and free audio-guide and we were on our way.

    This is Britains only hot spring, a magnificent temple and bathing complex which was built by the Roman's. To this very day, it still flows with natural hot water. I sat on the edge of the Roman Bath, just to feel how hot the water was.

    There is quite a lot to see here, so leave enough time to see all the Baths, Courtyards, Museum and the waters source.
    I found it quite amazing to be walking on these old stones, where Roman's would had done many umpteen years before me.
    The Museum has an extensive display of preserved treasures from the spring and are presented well.
    You can even try a glass of Spa water from the fountain.

    We visited late in the day, this turned out to be a real good idea, as there was hardly anybody here.
    In July & August, the Baths are open from 10am - 9pm

    Times vary a lot, so please check out this page...
    http://visitbath.co.uk/things-to-do/attractions/roman-baths-p25681

    ADMISSION IN 2014
    http://www.romanbaths.co.uk/visiting/admission_charges.aspx

    Water flowing from the Spring
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    ROMAN BATHS - THE GREAT BATH

    by balhannah Written Jan 24, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Great Bath was where most people seemed to be. They were sitting on the edge, dipping their feet and hand's into the Water.

    It is the centrepiece of the Roman baths, a pool lined with 45 sheets of lead, and filled with hot spa water directly from the Sacred Spring, providing a warm swim.
    The bath is lined with 45 thick sheets of lead and is 1.6 metres deep, with access by steps that entirely surround the bath.
    A large flat slab of stone is set across the point where hot water flows into the bath. It is known today as the diving stone.

    If you visit in the peak season, you will see costumed people around the Great Bath from 10am to 5pm and every afternoon between 1.30pm and 4.30pm in the winter months.

    The Great Bath
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • tvor's Profile Photo

    Roman Baths

    by tvor Updated Aug 5, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The whole reason the city is there. The Romans discovered the advantages of the natural mineral hot springs and built a huge complex of Baths and temples. The baths and the city deteriorated but was rediscovered in the 18th Century. The Baths were and continue to be restored and researched. The building that houses it was rebuilt by the Georgians. The Georgian Pump Rooms overlooks the Sacred Spring bath and tea and luncheons are served there. There is a gift shop as well and the museum entry fee comes with a long device which is the audio tour. You punch in numbers that correspond to signs around the complex. It's very good and comes in many languages.

    You can see the excavations under the Baths and there are a lot of interactive and informative signs in addition to the recorded guide. There is a diorama/scale model of what the whole complex might have looked like in Roman days as well.

    The cost in 2011 prices is £12.00 and the combined ticket with the Fashion museum/Assembly rooms, about a mile away, is £15.50. It's a bit high, but is interesting if you like this kind of thing. I did enjoy the Fashion museum which is a cheaper entrance ticket on its own at £7.25.

    Reflections The Sacred Spring, Roman Baths Pediment Great Bath Spring Overflow

    Was this review helpful?

  • uglyscot's Profile Photo

    Aquae Sulis

    by uglyscot Updated Jun 17, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Roman Baths were built over unique hot springs of water. The Romans built a temple To Minerva and bathing complex that still flows with natural hot water. Look down at the green water, from which rises a pervasive smell. Statues are placed round the wall. Then go down below street level and visit the water's source . The extensive ruins and treasures from the spring are preserved and presented well, and information is explained in the audio-guide, which is available in several languages.

    Costumed characters [e.g. a Roman soldier and a pilgrim or monk] mingle with visitors every day. As well as archaeological explanations, a children's audioguide and "Bryson at the Baths" audioguide tours are included in the admission price, and make the tour enjoyable..
    A special day offer can be obtained which includes 2 hours in a spa and lunch in the Pump Room as well as entry to the Roman Baths , for £55.

    Opening 1 Mar 2009 - 30 Jun 2009
    Day Opening Times
    Monday 09:00 - 17:00
    Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
    Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
    Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
    Friday 09:00 - 17:00
    Saturday 09:00 - 17:00
    Sunday 09:00 - 17:00
    Bank Holiday 09:00 - 17:00
    Opening 1 Jul 2009 - 31 Aug 2009
    Day Opening Times
    Monday 09:00 - 21:00
    Tuesday 09:00 - 21:00
    Wednesday 09:00 - 21:00
    Thursday 09:00 - 21:00
    Friday 09:00 - 21:00
    Saturday 09:00 - 21:00
    Sunday 09:00 - 21:00
    Bank Holiday 09:00 - 21:00
    Opening 1 Sep 2009 - 31 Oct 2009
    Day Opening Times
    Monday 09:00 - 17:00
    Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
    Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
    Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
    Friday 09:00 - 17:00
    Saturday 09:00 - 17:00
    Sunday 09:00 - 17:00
    Bank Holiday 09:00 - 17:00
    Opening 1 Nov 2009 - 31 Dec 2009
    Day Opening Times
    Monday 09:30 - 16:30
    Tuesday 09:30 - 16:30
    Wednesday 09:30 - 16:30
    Thursday 09:30 - 16:30
    Friday 09:30 - 16:30
    Saturday 09:30 - 16:30
    Sunday 09:30 - 16:30
    Bank Holiday 09:30 - 16:30
    Opening 1 Jan 2010 - 28 Feb 2010
    Day Opening Times
    Monday 09:30 - 16:30
    Tuesday 09:30 - 16:30
    Wednesday 09:30 - 16:30
    Thursday 09:30 - 16:30
    Friday 09:30 - 16:30
    Saturday 09:30 - 16:30
    Sunday 09:30 - 16:30
    Tickets Information
    Ticket Type Ticket Tariff*
    Family (2 Adults + 4 Children) £32.00 per ticket
    Adult from £11.00 to £11.50 per ticket
    Concession £9.50 per ticket
    Child £7.20 per ticket

    looking down to baths model the waters statues in upper area a smaller bath area
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    The Pump Rooms, Bath

    by suvanki Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Built by Baldwin between 1790 to 1795. This neo-classical salon was once the social hub of Bath.

    For over 2,000 years, the secret of the hot spring waters as a curative property has lured visitors to Bath.
    Originally, bathing in the waters was the way to be gently restored to health, but in the late 17th century, drinking the waters instead, or as well as was the way to go!

    The hot spring waters are drawn into the pump room, and the 43 minerals found in the water can be tasted today.

    A pumper, wearing an authentically researched costume of 1795 (the year this pump room opened) will offer you a glass of this apparently 'unusual' tasting water.
    I'm afraid I didn't get to try this experience (or am I?) I'd guess 'unusual' means yeuukkk!

    The hot waters heat the Roman Baths, and provide heating for the Pump Rooms during winter.

    Admission is free - our guided tour ended here, enabling a quick peep at the steaming Roman Bath through a window.

    The Pump Room Restaurant is a popular place to eat, with 'old fashioned service' but contempory English cuisine, eaten whilst being serenaded by the Pump Room Trio, or a pianist.

    There are also a few antiques on display, including a clock made by Thomas Tompin - presented to the rooms in 1709.

    Pump Rooms, Bath Stone plaque - Roman Baths/Pump Room Bath
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • cleocat's Profile Photo

    A Miracle Cure

    by cleocat Written Feb 1, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Apparently the water has miracle abilities. We did drink some of the water from the spring that is suppose to cure illnesses. Nobody was sick so I don't know if it works. Some people said it tastes awful, but it just tastes like hot seawater.

    Even if you don't want to queue to get a ticket or find it too expensive to do the entire tour, just peep in by restaurant and the shop to get an idea of what the baths look like.

    Roman baths
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    Known as Aquae Sulis

    by spidermiss Updated Jul 11, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Roman Baths are worth visiting for the history and how Bath became an important city in the Roman times as well as the Georgian ones. The Baths are known as Aquae Sulis which were originally completed with temple and baths during the 1st and 5th centuries A.D and were revolved around a natural hot spring. On entry, visitors are given an audio guide which complements the main highlights of the Roman Baths. It took me around 2.5 hours to take in all the information and history and cost around 11-12GBP.

    The Roman Baths The Roman Baths The Roman Baths The Roman Baths The Roman Baths
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • grayfo's Profile Photo

    Roman Baths

    by grayfo Written Mar 25, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Roman Bath’s are one of the largest tourist attractions in South West England and are Britain's only hot spring. The site includes the remains of the Temple of Aquae Sulis, the Roman baths fed by the sacred hot spring, and a well-presented museum of artifacts found at the site.

    January – February: 9.30 am to 4.30 pm

    March – June: 9.00 am to 5.00 pm

    July – August: 9.00 am to 9.00 pm

    September – October: 9.00 am to 5.00 pm

    November – December: 9.30 am to 4.30 pm

    email romanbaths_bookings@bathnes.gov.uk

    February 2010

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Myfanwe's Profile Photo

    The Roman Baths

    by Myfanwe Written Mar 10, 2010

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Roman Baths are by far the biggest tourist attraction in Bath. The Baths themselves are below the modern street level. There are four main features: the Sacred Spring, the Roman Temple, the Roman Bath House and the Museum which you can walk around and admire the Roman artefacts which have been recovered from the site, some of which were found to have been thrown in the sacred spring! The buildings above street level date from the 19th century. The main bath house has some fabulous Roman Soldiers carved in the famous bathstone overlooking the baths.

    The temple was constructed in 60-70 AD and the bathing complex was gradually built up over the next 300 years. The baths have been modified on several occasions, including the 12th century when John of Tours built a curative bath over the King's Spring reservoir and the 16th century when the city corporation built a new bath (Queen's Bath) to the south of the Spring.

    The Baths are well worth a visit although I found the entrance fee a littel on the steep side.

    Roman Baths Roman Baths Roman Baths Roman Baths Artefacts from the Museum
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Bath

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

22 travelers online now

Comments

View all Bath hotels