Roman Baths, Bath

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  • Evening reception at the Baths
    Evening reception at the Baths
    by toonsarah
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    by alza
  • Roman Baths
    by alza
  • grayfo's Profile Photo

    Roman Baths

    by grayfo Written Mar 25, 2010

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    The Roman Bath’s are one of the largest tourist attractions in South West England and are Britain's only hot spring. The site includes the remains of the Temple of Aquae Sulis, the Roman baths fed by the sacred hot spring, and a well-presented museum of artifacts found at the site.

    January – February: 9.30 am to 4.30 pm

    March – June: 9.00 am to 5.00 pm

    July – August: 9.00 am to 9.00 pm

    September – October: 9.00 am to 5.00 pm

    November – December: 9.30 am to 4.30 pm

    email romanbaths_bookings@bathnes.gov.uk

    February 2010

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  • sourbugger's Profile Photo

    Taking the waters

    by sourbugger Updated Sep 13, 2005

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    Bath Spa water

    In the pump room of the Roman Baths (you can enter this part for free) is posistioned a rotund gentleman who dispenses the famous Bath Spa water.

    The last time I visited the man in question, in impressive 18th century garb, charged 50pence for each glass. It may have wonderful properties and contain 43 minerals, but I refuse to cough up for something - even if it stops me from coughing up !

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  • sourbugger's Profile Photo

    No 1attraction in Bath

    by sourbugger Updated Sep 20, 2005

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    The Roman Baths is the number one site in the town. They are, after all, one of the best-preserved Roman sites north of the Alps and at the very heart of the site is the Sacred Spring. It's hot water gushes out at a temperature of 46 Degrees Centigrade (by heck, that's warm) and it's been doing this for thousands of years.

    In the past this natural phenomenon was beyond human understanding and so it was attributed to the Gods. In Roman times a great Temple was built next to the Spring dedicated to the goddess Sulis Minerva, a deity with healing powers. The mineral rich water from the Spring supplied a magnificent bath-house which attracted visitors from across the Roman Empire.

    I found this 'religious' side to it quite interesting, making it more than just 'another' spa. It is all very well explained on the audio-guide which is used to accompany your visit (Free audio tours are available in English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Dutch and Japanese.)
    There are also hourly tours of the Roman Baths are free.
    The Roman Baths is not wheelchair accessible. However, wheelchair users are admitted free to the Terrace overlooking the Great Bath.

    Well worth the entry fee of nine pounds 50p

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  • pedersdottir's Profile Photo

    What Jane Austen never saw

    by pedersdottir Updated Apr 4, 2004

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    Nouveau Roman Bath

    Although the foundations of the Roman Baths were rediscovered in 1755, the pillars and porticoes we see today were created by the Victorians. The ancient-style busts of Roman emperors and statemen that line the upper promenade are less than 150 years old. Full details of the reconstruction are related in the audio tour that comes with the price of admission.

    Below the lead-lined pool seen here in the picture, lies one of the original hot springs. It is visible from one of the subterranean chambers that constitute the Roman ruins. The network of baths and steam rooms that grew up around the mineral springs is demonstrated by amazing video re-creations. In Roman times pilgrims tossed tiny prayer-inscribed plaques into the waters, invoking Minerva's favor. Modern visitors have filled several of the pools with coins and paper bills - invoking the powers of ---what? -- the gods of prosperity perhaps.

    Next to these Roman ruins 18th century builders created the Pump Room. This was where fashionable society came to 'take the waters'.

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  • annase's Profile Photo

    The world famous Roman Baths

    by annase Updated Apr 6, 2014

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    The Great Bath
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    I was wondering whether a visit to the Roman Baths would be an interesting place to visit, since the entrance can seem rather pricey and I didn't have time to find that much information what exactly was going to be in there well ahead. I almost decided not to go, but then realised that once I was in Bath, I might as well go - otherwise I'd be annoyed with myself afterwards.

    The decision turned out to be a really good one, since I really enjoyed the visit. The audio tour helped a lot, since you get a commentary about various things you see, but you don't have to listen to all the stuff on it, but you can pick and choose.

    There is a wealth of things to see once you're inside. The Great Bath is the centre piece of the Roman bathing establishment. However, there are many other excavated features that are about 6m below the modern street level. The main features of the museum include the mysterious hot spring that was thought to be sacred by the Romans (hence the name "Sacret Spring", and which feeds hot water to the Great Bath), a Roman temple, the bath house and finds from Roman Bath (such as the gilt bronze head of the goddess Sulis Minerva). You'll see things like the great Roman drain that carries water from the Spring and the Great Bath to the River Avon. Even after 2000 years it still performs its original purpose. The drain on the eastern side of the baths was lined originally with wooden boards which are still there!

    Definitely worth a visit.

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  • birchy99's Profile Photo

    Is it "The Baaaths" or "The Baaahhhths"?

    by birchy99 Updated Dec 19, 2004

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    Well, whatever, you must tour the Roman Baths. If you are into archeology, this is a must see. One can spend at least a day just gorging on the archeological information. Just follow the signs and the arrows. If you are in a hurry you can pass most of it up and just take some pixs and go up to The Pump Room.
    I recommend spending some time indulging in the history and architecture. It is truly amazing what those old Romans accomplished as they pillaged the countryside. Every empire has its spa!!!

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  • uglyscot's Profile Photo

    Aquae Sulis

    by uglyscot Updated Jun 17, 2011

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    looking down to baths
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    The Roman Baths were built over unique hot springs of water. The Romans built a temple To Minerva and bathing complex that still flows with natural hot water. Look down at the green water, from which rises a pervasive smell. Statues are placed round the wall. Then go down below street level and visit the water's source . The extensive ruins and treasures from the spring are preserved and presented well, and information is explained in the audio-guide, which is available in several languages.

    Costumed characters [e.g. a Roman soldier and a pilgrim or monk] mingle with visitors every day. As well as archaeological explanations, a children's audioguide and "Bryson at the Baths" audioguide tours are included in the admission price, and make the tour enjoyable..
    A special day offer can be obtained which includes 2 hours in a spa and lunch in the Pump Room as well as entry to the Roman Baths , for £55.

    Opening 1 Mar 2009 - 30 Jun 2009
    Day Opening Times
    Monday 09:00 - 17:00
    Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
    Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
    Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
    Friday 09:00 - 17:00
    Saturday 09:00 - 17:00
    Sunday 09:00 - 17:00
    Bank Holiday 09:00 - 17:00
    Opening 1 Jul 2009 - 31 Aug 2009
    Day Opening Times
    Monday 09:00 - 21:00
    Tuesday 09:00 - 21:00
    Wednesday 09:00 - 21:00
    Thursday 09:00 - 21:00
    Friday 09:00 - 21:00
    Saturday 09:00 - 21:00
    Sunday 09:00 - 21:00
    Bank Holiday 09:00 - 21:00
    Opening 1 Sep 2009 - 31 Oct 2009
    Day Opening Times
    Monday 09:00 - 17:00
    Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
    Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
    Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
    Friday 09:00 - 17:00
    Saturday 09:00 - 17:00
    Sunday 09:00 - 17:00
    Bank Holiday 09:00 - 17:00
    Opening 1 Nov 2009 - 31 Dec 2009
    Day Opening Times
    Monday 09:30 - 16:30
    Tuesday 09:30 - 16:30
    Wednesday 09:30 - 16:30
    Thursday 09:30 - 16:30
    Friday 09:30 - 16:30
    Saturday 09:30 - 16:30
    Sunday 09:30 - 16:30
    Bank Holiday 09:30 - 16:30
    Opening 1 Jan 2010 - 28 Feb 2010
    Day Opening Times
    Monday 09:30 - 16:30
    Tuesday 09:30 - 16:30
    Wednesday 09:30 - 16:30
    Thursday 09:30 - 16:30
    Friday 09:30 - 16:30
    Saturday 09:30 - 16:30
    Sunday 09:30 - 16:30
    Tickets Information
    Ticket Type Ticket Tariff*
    Family (2 Adults + 4 Children) £32.00 per ticket
    Adult from £11.00 to £11.50 per ticket
    Concession £9.50 per ticket
    Child £7.20 per ticket

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  • tvor's Profile Photo

    Roman Baths

    by tvor Updated Aug 5, 2011

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    Reflections
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    The whole reason the city is there. The Romans discovered the advantages of the natural mineral hot springs and built a huge complex of Baths and temples. The baths and the city deteriorated but was rediscovered in the 18th Century. The Baths were and continue to be restored and researched. The building that houses it was rebuilt by the Georgians. The Georgian Pump Rooms overlooks the Sacred Spring bath and tea and luncheons are served there. There is a gift shop as well and the museum entry fee comes with a long device which is the audio tour. You punch in numbers that correspond to signs around the complex. It's very good and comes in many languages.

    You can see the excavations under the Baths and there are a lot of interactive and informative signs in addition to the recorded guide. There is a diorama/scale model of what the whole complex might have looked like in Roman days as well.

    The cost in 2011 prices is £12.00 and the combined ticket with the Fashion museum/Assembly rooms, about a mile away, is £15.50. It's a bit high, but is interesting if you like this kind of thing. I did enjoy the Fashion museum which is a cheaper entrance ticket on its own at £7.25.

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    ROMAN BATHS

    by balhannah Updated Dec 28, 2013

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    This is what I wanted to see, I had heard and read so much about them.

    We arrived at the entrance, paid our admission fee, were given a brochure and free audio-guide and we were on our way.

    This is Britains only hot spring, a magnificent temple and bathing complex which was built by the Roman's. To this very day, it still flows with natural hot water. I sat on the edge of the Roman Bath, just to feel how hot the water was.

    There is quite a lot to see here, so leave enough time to see all the Baths, Courtyards, Museum and the waters source.
    I found it quite amazing to be walking on these old stones, where Roman's would had done many umpteen years before me.
    The Museum has an extensive display of preserved treasures from the spring and are presented well.
    You can even try a glass of Spa water from the fountain.

    We visited late in the day, this turned out to be a real good idea, as there was hardly anybody here.
    In July & August, the Baths are open from 10am - 9pm

    Times vary a lot, so please check out this page...
    http://visitbath.co.uk/things-to-do/attractions/roman-baths-p25681

    ADMISSION IN 2014
    http://www.romanbaths.co.uk/visiting/admission_charges.aspx

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  • jusdenise93's Profile Photo

    Visit the Roman Baths

    by jusdenise93 Updated Jul 18, 2009

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    At the Entrance
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    Roman Baths were centers for public bathing and socialization. People in bath houses stayed for hours and they went daily.

    The Roman Baths are divided into four major sections: The Sacred Spring, the Roman Temple, the Roman Bath House proper, and finds from the Roman Baths. All are included in admission and essentially seamless as you walk through the facility.

    From the story of its discovery to the artifacts and ruins that you will see, all worth the visit.

    Either take a guided tour or just listen in your audio guide (provided at the entrance).

    The audio tour has three commentaries, one for adults, one for children and a shorter commentary by Bill Bryson.

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  • Balam's Profile Photo

    Roman Baths and Pump Room

    by Balam Written Mar 2, 2010

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    Roman Baths
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    The city of Bath was first established by the Romans in AD 43 as a spa resort with the Latin name, Aquae Sulis or 'the waters of Sulis' although it is Known that the springs treated as a shrine by the Celt who dedicated it to the goddess Sulis and many religious items or offerings have been found, although it was probably more of a sacred site that would have had no buildings.
    The Romans built the baths with a temple around hot springs but although the Romans identified the Goddess Sulis with their goddess Minerva the name of Sulis continued to be used for the spring.
    The Victorians unearthed the original Roman Baths and built around them making into a popular place to visit. The water temprature when it emerges from the spring is 46 c and the spring yeilds aproximatly 250,000 gallons per day. Inside the museum there is a fantastic display of objects which have been found in and around the spring including coins, metal cups, jewelry, masks and curses etched onto metal. There are lots of Roman remaind to look at including the baths.

    You can enjoy a cup of Tea, Coffee or a light meal in the Pump Room which has been a popular meeting place since the 18th Century when fashioable people would meet to sample the Spa water.
    We sampled a glass of spa water as you get a free glass with the ticket price, otherwise it is 50p per glass. We asked for ours and the girl who came over said i will just give you one because it's a bit horrible' but i quite liked it.

    The Roman baths and pump room are probably the main reason or at least the main attraction that visitors want to see. The council own and run it and knowing that everybody wants to visit they charge quite a lot for entry. Although this is under things to do it should also be under tourist traps. It is certainly worth visiting but the hefty £11.50 entrance fee is way over the top and is just greedy. What i found even worse is that near the end of your tour when passing one of the baths there is a notice up about how once offerings were made to the gods by throwing things into the spring and suggesting that people throw money in by saying 'Any money thrown into the spring will be used to aid local archeology' and indeed people have thrown money in. I found this to be a bit cheeky judging by the extortionate entrance fee.

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Roman Baths

    by SLLiew Updated Feb 24, 2008

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    A short tour of this Roman Baths for tourists to gauwk at the engineering and sophistication of the Roman plumbing technology when Rome occupied England.

    There is a pool surrounded with Roman columns. An improved pumping system that was added later as pointed out by our tour guide.

    The Roman Baths was built around the hotsprings in this area. The water in the Bath today is still unsafe to use and do not try to drink the water either. There is heavy concentration of lead due to use of lead pipes in the past.

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  • Sharon's Profile Photo

    The Roman Bath & Pump Room

    by Sharon Updated Jan 6, 2003

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    Well obviously the most famouse and the main attraction of Bath. Lots of ruins from the Romas times and quite interesting to see.
    The tour inside might take around one hour and the price is 8.5 £ per person (for adults).

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  • uglyscot's Profile Photo

    The museum under the Baths

    by uglyscot Written May 22, 2009

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    a character
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    Go down below ground level and see how the baths work, their original source, the frigidarium, the temple of Minerva, mosaics, Roman relics including coins and gemstones ,statues, tombstones, curses thrown to the Gods against thieves and criminals....see Roman life on screens, walk on the stone pavements now distorted from thousands of visitors making the pilgrimage over 2000 years.

    I was very pleasantly surprised how much there was to see, and how well everything was presented. The audioguide had a section for children , which adults could enjoy too. The commentry by Bill Bryson was most enjoyable.

    Well worth the entry fee.

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  • kit_mc's Profile Photo

    If you do nothing else in Bath...

    by kit_mc Written May 2, 2005

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    Steaming Roman Baths

    These baths are really rather famous and are well worth the £9.50 (8.50 concessions) entry fee.

    I've been here twice and have learnt something new each time. It's pretty cool to stroll through the museum, into the different areas of the baths and imagine what it was like to be a local in the days the baths were in use in Roman times.

    As well as the history of the area, it gives an insight into Roman life in Britain more generally. The Baths are still full of steaming water but try to take a dip and you'll be in trouble! Apart from the algae that grows on the water due to the sunlight getting in, it's prohibited.

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