Royal Crescent, Bath

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  • The Royal Crescent, Bath
    The Royal Crescent, Bath
    by spidermiss
  • The Royal Crescent, Bath
    The Royal Crescent, Bath
    by spidermiss
  • The Royal Crescent, Bath
    The Royal Crescent, Bath
    by spidermiss
  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    The Royal Crescent - Architecture & Symbolism!

    by spidermiss Updated Jul 4, 2012

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    The Royal Crescent, Bath
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    30 Georgian style houses lay out The Royal Crescent. Designed by the John Wood the Younger, an architect, and built between 1767 and 1774. The listed exterior hardly has changed as it was when it was first built. Residents still live in The Royal Crescent but there is also a luxury hotel and a museum and some offices.

    The Royal Crescent looks out to Royal Victoria Park. It might suggest John Wood, the Elder, and John Wood, the younger, were interested in spiritism which could have link The Royal Crescent with The Circus nearby. An aerial view of both sites picture a giant circle and crescent which symbolises the sun and the moon (soleil-lune). Also the circus with Gay Street and Queen Square forms a masonic symbol, a key shape, which connects with the architects' profession.

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    Royal Crescent

    by grayfo Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Royal Crescent is a residential road of 30 houses, laid out in a crescent and was built starting 1767 and completed 1774 to the design of John Wood the Younger. In front of the building there is a long slope of green lawn. The Royal Crescent also includes the Royal Crescent Hotel (number 16) and a museum (number 1) which is operated by the Bath Preservation Trust.

    February 2010

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    Must- see Ionic Columns

    by jusdenise93 Written Jul 19, 2009

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    Outside View of the Royal Crescent
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    Designed by John Wood II (1767-75), the Royal Crescent is comprised of thirty houses, shaped like a half-Colosseum, which uses a gigantic series of Ionic columns on high bases.

    The famous travel writer Jan Morris once wrote about The Royal Crescent, "It lies there in a shallow arc, its wide Lawns running away beyond the Ha-ha down the hill below, and all is suddenly space, and green, and leisure. The Crescent is architecture on a truly palatial scale and reminds many people of Versailles". (Introduction to Bath: An Architectural Guide, by Charles Robertson, 1975).

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  • uglyscot's Profile Photo

    Royal Crescent

    by uglyscot Updated May 21, 2009

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    One of the places I wanted to see was the Royal Crescent - a sweep of houses in a crescent shape. The buildings are all alike made of the honey coloured stone of the area, but the owners have shown their indivduality in the paintwork.
    Another similar street is the Circus, a street around a central leafy circular area.
    I could picture the young girls stepping out to visit the pump rooms dressed in their finery, and dreaming of meeting a rich , and maybe titled, Mr Right.

    The Royal Crescent was built between 1767 and 1775 to the design of John Wood the Younger. It forms a semi-ellipse of thirty Grade I listed houses arranged around a great Lawn., which runs down the hill below. It provides space, and green where people can relax and take their leisure. The whole design was a new concept in architecture at the time.
    Now many of these elegant homes have been turned into apartments, and some form the Royal Crescent Hotel. No.1 has become a Georgian House museum.

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  • graeme83's Profile Photo

    Royal Crescent

    by graeme83 Written Apr 29, 2009

    Probably the most famous group of buildings in Bath, the royal crescent is a truly magnificent group of houses with Georgian architecture. In front of the houses is a nice park / garden which is great for relaxing or playing a bit of football in in the summer.

    The houses were designed by the architect John Wood the Younger and finished in 1774.

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Such an elegant street

    by toonsarah Updated Mar 15, 2009

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    Royal Crescent, Bath
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    The Royal Crescent is possibly the best known of Bath’s elegant Georgian Streets and its most striking. The harmonious parade of 30 houses was designed by the architect John Wood the Younger and built between 1767 and 1774.

    Today most of the houses are privately owned, and many of them broken into flats, but the harmonious appearance is retained, and the views out across Royal Victoria Park must make this one of the most desirable addresses in the city. The central few houses are however a hotel, if you fancy a taste of this exclusivity (at a high price, I imagine, and Number 1 (the first house you come to if approaching from the city centre and Circus) is a museum, maintained by the Bath Preservation Trust, which illustrates how wealthy owners of the period might have furnished and lived in such a house. I didn’t go inside on this occasion, as my time was limited and I had been before, but I remember it as offering a great introduction to life in Georgian and Regency times.

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    Longleat Safari Park

    by uglyscot Updated Oct 29, 2008

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    deer looking for food

    When you buy your ticket there are different options: The Passport which gives access to all the attractions and costs £22. It can be used again if you did not complete all the activities on offer within the same year.
    At the entrance there are picnic tables and toilets. As you are not allowed to get out of your car until completing the safari, take advantage of the toilet facilities now.
    When driving around the park, beware of the monkeys. They jump on cars, can break the aerial of the car, or play with the wind screen wipers. It's fun watching the mayhem being done on someone else's car, but unbeknown to you, there may be a little mischief at work on your own! This happened to us.
    Children like to feed the deer and some can even be tame enough to come up to the open window and take the food from your hand. Cups of dried pellets can be bought for £1. Remember to wipe your hands thoroughly as soon as possible. A packet of wet wipes would be useful.

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    Royal Crescent

    by mallyak Written Sep 24, 2008

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    Royal Crescent was built between 1767 and 1775, numbering 30 houses built in the trademark honey stone of Bath with a facade of columns. In front of the crescent is a grass area which now extends into Victoria Park. The houses are still as fashionable today as they were then.

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    Royal Crescent

    by cruisegirl4life Written Jul 30, 2008
    Royal Crescent
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    We walked to the Royal Crescent at about 6:30 am to view and take pictures of it with no people around.

    This is a set of 30 houses arranged in a crescent and is about 250 years old. Most of the residences are privately owned, but there is a museum at 1 Royal Crescent (that shows how wealthy owners of the period may have furnished their home). It is also listed as the best example of Georgian architecture in the United Kingdom. The Royal Crescent Hotel is in the very center of the Crescent, but since it was early, we skipped stepping inside for a quick peek.

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  • Ben-UK's Profile Photo

    Royal Crescent

    by Ben-UK Written May 5, 2008

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    Royal Crescent, Bath

    Built between 1767 and 1775, there are 30 houses in the Royal Crescent - the properties are occupied, many seem to have been split into apartments, but No.1 is a museum (see website below). Wandering along the crescent it's easy to imagine what it must have been like to live here in the late 1700's when horse-drawn carriages would have taken residents into Bath centre.

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    Royal Crescent

    by Dabs Updated Feb 12, 2008

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    The Royal Crescent is 30 Georgian houses, laid out in a crescent, built between 1767 and 1774. The architect was John Wood the Younger, who completed the Circus in Bath upon his father's death.

    A citation in Wikipedia claims that Wood the Younger and Wood the Elder were interested in the occult and the Masonic Temple and that from overhead the Royal Crescent and Circus symbolize the sun and moon and that the Circus, Gay Street and Queens Square form a key shape which is also a Masonic symbol. As I won't be flying over Bath anytime soon I can't verify this but I thought it was an interesting bit of either trivia or speculation.

    Number 1 Royal Crescent is a museum, maintained by the Bath Preservation Trust, where you can see a town house redecorated and furnished to show how it might have appeared in the late 18th century. It was closed for the season when we were there, but our guide said it was well worth a visit.

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  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    The Royal Crescent

    by suvanki Updated Nov 28, 2007

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    The Royal Crescent, Bath

    One of Baths best known landmarks. Considered to be one of the finest European Crescents, and one of the greatest examples of Georgian architecture in the UK.

    Now a Grade 1 listed building.

    John Wood The Younger was the architect. He built it between 1767 and 1774, and was inspired by Wood Junior and Seniors' interest in occult and masonic symbolism.
    Viewed from the air, the crescent and the nearby (round) Circus, symbolise the sun and moon (soleil-lune).

    The huge curved facade is quite misleading though. It appears to be about 30 houses, all symetrically arranged, with their Ionic columns on the ground floor.
    If viewed from behind the crescent, the illusion is shattered- with varying roof levels, and a mix of decorations and architectural additions.

    Apparently, each resident purchased a certain length of the facade, with their own specifications being carried out by their own architect. So, the appearance of 2 houses from the front, might actually be one building.

    Today, most of these houses are still privately owned (and are highly sought after - with a premium price being paid!!) many have been divided into flats. Some are owned by a housing association.

    Number 1 Royal Crescent, (now a museum, maintained by the Bath Preservation Trust)) was built for his father in law. Although I didn't have time to visit the museum, it apparently represents how wealthy Georgians would have lived.

    The Royal Crescent is one of Baths main attractions, visited daily- either by individual visitors, or tour groups. The road following the Crescent is closed to coaches and buses now - A few years ago, these residents had to endure tour buses passing by their windows and doors with regularity.

    I'd wanted to see this crescent, as for many years, I'd been under the impression that the musical Oliver had been filmed here. Donald, our guide couldn't confirm this (and as he was an expert in Bath, I guess it wasn't)

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  • sswagner's Profile Photo

    The Royal Crescent

    by sswagner Written Dec 29, 2006

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    The Royal Crescent

    Bath is a wonderful place to view several styles of architecture. There are Roman ruins, the Gothic Abbey, and the Georgian areas of town. The 18th Century Royal Crescent is a row of townhouses and a museum set in front of a large green area. These are likely the most expensive and hard to get examples of real estate in the city. Tour buses are now banned from passing directly in front of the townhouses. I enjoyed walking through this area, even if a little bit of rain was falling. The Royal Crescent is situated close to the Circus. The Crescent and the Circus are thought to symbolize the moon and the sun respectively. These areas are best explored by foot, and they are within reasonable walking distance from Bath's many other attractions.

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  • UKDaisy's Profile Photo

    Georgian architecture in all its glory

    by UKDaisy Updated Dec 26, 2006

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    The Royal Crescent is a crescent-shaped street filled with Grade 1 listed Georgian houses. Many of the houses are privately owned. At No. 1 Royal Crescent you'll find a museum recreating how the interior of a house could have looked liked during the Georgian era.

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  • VinceTraveller's Profile Photo

    Bath, an enchanted weekend.

    by VinceTraveller Updated Oct 26, 2006

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    City of Bath as seen from the

    What a treat I gave myself by staying for a weekend at the famous city of Bath. It is where most of Jane Austen's novel takes place. To see the famous Pultney Bridge and the "Noble Cliffs" were enchanting. The Roman Baths and the Bath Abbey are a must-see when one is in Bath. Architecturally, this place is a haven for admirers of the great Georgian style...one must not miss the glorious Royal Crescent.

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