Royal Crescent, Bath

4.5 out of 5 stars 33 Reviews

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  • The Royal Crescent, Bath
    The Royal Crescent, Bath
    by spidermiss
  • The Royal Crescent, Bath
    The Royal Crescent, Bath
    by spidermiss
  • The Royal Crescent, Bath
    The Royal Crescent, Bath
    by spidermiss
  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    The Royal Crescent

    by Airpunk Written Aug 26, 2006

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    The Royal Crescent, Bath
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    Bath is home to two immense georgian structures, the Circus and the Royal Crescent. While the Circus was designed by John Wood the Elder and finished by his son, John Wood the Younger, the Royal Crescent is a work completely designed by the son. The Royal Crescent is a half-circle consisting of 30 houses. Most houses are used for living, but some are used as a luxury hotel while no. 1 is a museum. A grass area in fornt of the buildings also belong to the Royal Crescent. Compared to the park, it is a little elevated with a small fence separating these two lawns.

    The Royal Crescent was built between 1767 and 1774. It is said that the two structures symbolise sun (Circus) and moon (Royal Crescent) although no written information about that is known.

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  • daelight's Profile Photo

    A Picnic Spot with Very Expensive Houses

    by daelight Written Jul 4, 2006

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    The only picture with me in it on VT :)

    Yep, it's famous for being a World Heritage Site, very gande so it is. Many a picnic was had in Victoria Park with the Royal Cresent behind us. In the evenings if the wind is light and the weather favourable you will have hughe hot air balloons launching up in to the sky and drifting out across Somerset.. a very nice scenery ...

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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    The Royal Crescent

    by Tom_Fields Written Jul 2, 2006
    The Royal Crescent
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    Designed by John Wood (1704-1754), this is one of the finest examples of Georgian architecture. Wood was influenced by the Italian Palladian style of architecture, using Ionic-style pillars on his facade. Today, a luxury hotel occupies part of the Royal Crescent. Its web site is given below.

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  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Royal Crescent

    by Sjalen Updated Feb 28, 2006

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    Bath's Royal Crescent is the second World Heritage contribution and it is an impressive circle of houses framing the sloping lawn down to a park. Originally, these houses for the wealthy were built in the middle of the countryside so the grass banks you see is simply to keep grazing cattle out of the residents' gardens. You can visit number 1 as it is kept as a museum to show an interior of the times. If you do, you will find some wonderful rooms with quite unusual furniture here and there and there is a lady (usually) from the Bath Preservation Trust in each room to hand you a list of what you see and tell you more about items and the times (children get a special set of tasks to do if they want to). Most are quite knowledgable. The top floor only houses a collection of paintings but I absolutely loved the basement kitchen with a dog treading a "butter wheel" as a bizarre addition.

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    The Crescent

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 23, 2005

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    Through Victoria Park to the Crescent

    This place has been on more films than just about any place you'd care to name. It's a wonderfully curved street with a wonderful history.
    The wall in front of the Crescent (not visible here) is called Ha-ha which, if my memory serves me correctly, has nothing to do with laughing. It's actually a term for a type of barrier, often a small ditch or mound.
    There is also a circular street not far away which has also appeared on many films and where many famous people resided called The Circus which I cover with another page.
    The extra ordinary thing about property here is that, when built, all you got was a facade. It was then up to you to build out the back. It is also a property that is these days under what is known as "Flying Freehold".
    Without boring you with the extensive legal details, it meant that originally you could, for arguments sake, buy three floors in one unit and, say, the top floor of the adjacent one next door and maybe two floors of the place on the other side. Car parking spots are also up for grabs.

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  • sourbugger's Profile Photo

    Bath's Eiffel tower...

    by sourbugger Written Sep 9, 2005

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    If there is one iconic image of Bath that is recognised all over the world, it has to be the 'Royal Cresent'.

    The Royal Crescent consists of thirty houses. Some have described it as a half-Colosseum. The structure uses Ionic columns on high bases. The idea of blocks of town houses like this and the Circus was very influential.

    The road is now a cul-de-sac, and although superb in architectural terms, I somehow found it lacked a 'certain something' in terms of visual impact.

    What did suprise me however, was the view. The Cresent affords a great view out over the city.

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  • joanj's Profile Photo

    Fine Architecture

    by joanj Updated Jan 10, 2005

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    While in Bath a visit to The Royal Crescent is a must.

    The crescent buildings were the masterpiece of John Wood the Younger, and is sometimes referred to as "the finest crescent in Europe"

    One hundred and fourteen Ionic columns support a continuous cornice, over two hundred yards long. It was built between 1767 and 1775

    Just wish I had had my camera when I made the visit. I will be sure to take it next time.

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  • londonlover's Profile Photo

    The Royal Crescent

    by londonlover Updated Dec 7, 2004

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    My sister on the green

    Another great bit of Georgian architecture, with a huge green in front of it. This is an incredibly expensive place to live (most of this is subdivided into flats), but there is also a hotel and a museum within the crescent.

    This is on the far north side of town--not as centrally located as I had thought--but within a 15-minute walk from the Abbey and Baths.

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Royal Crescent

    by iandsmith Updated Nov 22, 2004

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    Can't see the fence?  Ha ha.

    Stroll around here and enjoy the fresh air and views of Royal Crescent. Designed by John Wood the Younger as lodging-houses for the gentry on their visits to Bath, this crescent was completed in 1767. It was in the middle of farmland then and had wonderful sweeping views of the hills and Avon valley. Those views now offer additional interest for fans of gasholder design and housing estate layout, but the Crescent itself remains a splendid sight, with Victoria Park calmly green below. Note the ha-ha, or sunken fence, which kept the sheep, cows and peasants from their front lawns, but didn't interrupt the view from the apartments. Why is it called ha-ha? I've no idea.
    What I can tell you to make you laugh is what happened on the day I planned to go to Bath and I approached my Eastern European hotel manager, like all staff obviously hired for a lower price than normal. Anyhow, the conversation went exactly like this:
    "I want to go to Bath"
    "Problem with bath?"
    "No, I want to go to Bath."
    ............10 second pause........
    "Which room you are in?"
    "No, the town, the city, Bath!!"
    Basil Fawlty would have understood.

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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    The fanciest address in Town

    by sue_stone Written Sep 21, 2004

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    The Royal Crescent

    The Royal Crescent is a sweeping crescent of spectacular georgian townhouses, that were built back in 1767-1774.

    The townhouses overlook a large private lawn, which appeared to be filled with tourists ignoring the private property sign, when I was there.

    I had seen so many photos of the Royal Crescent, that I felt a bit disappointed when I saw it. Perhaps it was just the grey weather.

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  • mardaska's Profile Photo

    The Royal Crescent

    by mardaska Updated Sep 3, 2004

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    The Royal Crescent

    The Royal Crescent consists of thirty elegant mansions of freestone, built on the 18th century.

    Number 1 was designed by John Wood the Younger as part of his masterpiece and was the first house to be built in the Royal Crescent. The house has been restored and redecorated in order to show how it might have appeared in the late eighteenth century.

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  • aah_stone's Profile Photo

    The Royal Crescent

    by aah_stone Updated May 13, 2004

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    The Royal Crescent

    You really must go and see this archtectural gem. Very beautiful, especially on a summers day with the sun shining. Lovely parkland in front of the crescent means you can sit down and enjoy a picnic too.

    It was designed around 1767 by an architect called John Wood II, his father designed The Circus in Bath. Within the crescent there are 30 different houses.

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  • rwlittle's Profile Photo

    If I had a million dollars...

    by rwlittle Written Mar 16, 2004

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    Royal Crescent, Bath

    ...I'd live here, in the Royal Crescent. This is an architectural masterpiece, where the rich folks live and enjoy the adjoining park. The crescent is a half circle, with the park filling in that circular shape.

    Royal Crescent #1 is a museum, open to the public.

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  • hevbell's Profile Photo

    ROYAL CRESCENT, Bath

    by hevbell Updated Feb 12, 2004

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    Royal Cresent Bath

    Bath is a spa town in the Avon Valley. Its probably most famous for its Roman baths which were built in the 1st century and the natural hot springs.
    Another famous sight in Bath is Royal Crescent. No1 is now owned by The National Trust and open to the public. It shows how the houses would have been in the 18th Century.

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  • Badie's Profile Photo

    The Royal Crescent

    by Badie Written Apr 28, 2003

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    Royal Crescent

    I should have paid more attention to what the tour guide was saying about this place, but at least I remember that this is one of the places that has free admission and it makes a good place to relax and have a sandwich while you enjoy the surrounding scenery....

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