Royal Crescent, Bath

4.5 out of 5 stars 33 Reviews

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  • The Royal Crescent, Bath
    The Royal Crescent, Bath
    by spidermiss
  • The Royal Crescent, Bath
    The Royal Crescent, Bath
    by spidermiss
  • The Royal Crescent, Bath
    The Royal Crescent, Bath
    by spidermiss
  • Ben-UK's Profile Photo

    Royal Crescent

    by Ben-UK Written May 5, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Royal Crescent, Bath

    Built between 1767 and 1775, there are 30 houses in the Royal Crescent - the properties are occupied, many seem to have been split into apartments, but No.1 is a museum (see website below). Wandering along the crescent it's easy to imagine what it must have been like to live here in the late 1700's when horse-drawn carriages would have taken residents into Bath centre.

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    The Royal Crescent

    by Airpunk Written Aug 26, 2006

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    The Royal Crescent, Bath
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    Bath is home to two immense georgian structures, the Circus and the Royal Crescent. While the Circus was designed by John Wood the Elder and finished by his son, John Wood the Younger, the Royal Crescent is a work completely designed by the son. The Royal Crescent is a half-circle consisting of 30 houses. Most houses are used for living, but some are used as a luxury hotel while no. 1 is a museum. A grass area in fornt of the buildings also belong to the Royal Crescent. Compared to the park, it is a little elevated with a small fence separating these two lawns.

    The Royal Crescent was built between 1767 and 1774. It is said that the two structures symbolise sun (Circus) and moon (Royal Crescent) although no written information about that is known.

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  • daelight's Profile Photo

    A Picnic Spot with Very Expensive Houses

    by daelight Written Jul 4, 2006

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    The only picture with me in it on VT :)

    Yep, it's famous for being a World Heritage Site, very gande so it is. Many a picnic was had in Victoria Park with the Royal Cresent behind us. In the evenings if the wind is light and the weather favourable you will have hughe hot air balloons launching up in to the sky and drifting out across Somerset.. a very nice scenery ...

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  • jusdenise93's Profile Photo

    Must- see Ionic Columns

    by jusdenise93 Written Jul 19, 2009

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    Outside View of the Royal Crescent
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    Designed by John Wood II (1767-75), the Royal Crescent is comprised of thirty houses, shaped like a half-Colosseum, which uses a gigantic series of Ionic columns on high bases.

    The famous travel writer Jan Morris once wrote about The Royal Crescent, "It lies there in a shallow arc, its wide Lawns running away beyond the Ha-ha down the hill below, and all is suddenly space, and green, and leisure. The Crescent is architecture on a truly palatial scale and reminds many people of Versailles". (Introduction to Bath: An Architectural Guide, by Charles Robertson, 1975).

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  • rwlittle's Profile Photo

    If I had a million dollars...

    by rwlittle Written Mar 16, 2004

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    Royal Crescent, Bath

    ...I'd live here, in the Royal Crescent. This is an architectural masterpiece, where the rich folks live and enjoy the adjoining park. The crescent is a half circle, with the park filling in that circular shape.

    Royal Crescent #1 is a museum, open to the public.

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  • sswagner's Profile Photo

    The Royal Crescent

    by sswagner Written Dec 29, 2006

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    The Royal Crescent

    Bath is a wonderful place to view several styles of architecture. There are Roman ruins, the Gothic Abbey, and the Georgian areas of town. The 18th Century Royal Crescent is a row of townhouses and a museum set in front of a large green area. These are likely the most expensive and hard to get examples of real estate in the city. Tour buses are now banned from passing directly in front of the townhouses. I enjoyed walking through this area, even if a little bit of rain was falling. The Royal Crescent is situated close to the Circus. The Crescent and the Circus are thought to symbolize the moon and the sun respectively. These areas are best explored by foot, and they are within reasonable walking distance from Bath's many other attractions.

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  • UKDaisy's Profile Photo

    Georgian architecture in all its glory

    by UKDaisy Updated Dec 26, 2006

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    The Royal Crescent is a crescent-shaped street filled with Grade 1 listed Georgian houses. Many of the houses are privately owned. At No. 1 Royal Crescent you'll find a museum recreating how the interior of a house could have looked liked during the Georgian era.

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  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Royal Crescent

    by Sjalen Updated Feb 28, 2006

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    Bath's Royal Crescent is the second World Heritage contribution and it is an impressive circle of houses framing the sloping lawn down to a park. Originally, these houses for the wealthy were built in the middle of the countryside so the grass banks you see is simply to keep grazing cattle out of the residents' gardens. You can visit number 1 as it is kept as a museum to show an interior of the times. If you do, you will find some wonderful rooms with quite unusual furniture here and there and there is a lady (usually) from the Bath Preservation Trust in each room to hand you a list of what you see and tell you more about items and the times (children get a special set of tasks to do if they want to). Most are quite knowledgable. The top floor only houses a collection of paintings but I absolutely loved the basement kitchen with a dog treading a "butter wheel" as a bizarre addition.

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  • joanj's Profile Photo

    Fine Architecture

    by joanj Updated Jan 10, 2005

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    While in Bath a visit to The Royal Crescent is a must.

    The crescent buildings were the masterpiece of John Wood the Younger, and is sometimes referred to as "the finest crescent in Europe"

    One hundred and fourteen Ionic columns support a continuous cornice, over two hundred yards long. It was built between 1767 and 1775

    Just wish I had had my camera when I made the visit. I will be sure to take it next time.

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  • aah_stone's Profile Photo

    The Royal Crescent

    by aah_stone Updated May 13, 2004

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    The Royal Crescent

    You really must go and see this archtectural gem. Very beautiful, especially on a summers day with the sun shining. Lovely parkland in front of the crescent means you can sit down and enjoy a picnic too.

    It was designed around 1767 by an architect called John Wood II, his father designed The Circus in Bath. Within the crescent there are 30 different houses.

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  • londonlover's Profile Photo

    The Royal Crescent

    by londonlover Updated Dec 7, 2004

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    My sister on the green

    Another great bit of Georgian architecture, with a huge green in front of it. This is an incredibly expensive place to live (most of this is subdivided into flats), but there is also a hotel and a museum within the crescent.

    This is on the far north side of town--not as centrally located as I had thought--but within a 15-minute walk from the Abbey and Baths.

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  • hevbell's Profile Photo

    ROYAL CRESCENT, Bath

    by hevbell Updated Feb 12, 2004

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    Royal Cresent Bath

    Bath is a spa town in the Avon Valley. Its probably most famous for its Roman baths which were built in the 1st century and the natural hot springs.
    Another famous sight in Bath is Royal Crescent. No1 is now owned by The National Trust and open to the public. It shows how the houses would have been in the 18th Century.

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    The Crescent

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 23, 2005

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    Through Victoria Park to the Crescent

    This place has been on more films than just about any place you'd care to name. It's a wonderfully curved street with a wonderful history.
    The wall in front of the Crescent (not visible here) is called Ha-ha which, if my memory serves me correctly, has nothing to do with laughing. It's actually a term for a type of barrier, often a small ditch or mound.
    There is also a circular street not far away which has also appeared on many films and where many famous people resided called The Circus which I cover with another page.
    The extra ordinary thing about property here is that, when built, all you got was a facade. It was then up to you to build out the back. It is also a property that is these days under what is known as "Flying Freehold".
    Without boring you with the extensive legal details, it meant that originally you could, for arguments sake, buy three floors in one unit and, say, the top floor of the adjacent one next door and maybe two floors of the place on the other side. Car parking spots are also up for grabs.

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  • graeme83's Profile Photo

    Royal Crescent

    by graeme83 Written Apr 29, 2009

    Probably the most famous group of buildings in Bath, the royal crescent is a truly magnificent group of houses with Georgian architecture. In front of the houses is a nice park / garden which is great for relaxing or playing a bit of football in in the summer.

    The houses were designed by the architect John Wood the Younger and finished in 1774.

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  • cruisegirl4life's Profile Photo

    Royal Crescent

    by cruisegirl4life Written Jul 30, 2008
    Royal Crescent
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    We walked to the Royal Crescent at about 6:30 am to view and take pictures of it with no people around.

    This is a set of 30 houses arranged in a crescent and is about 250 years old. Most of the residences are privately owned, but there is a museum at 1 Royal Crescent (that shows how wealthy owners of the period may have furnished their home). It is also listed as the best example of Georgian architecture in the United Kingdom. The Royal Crescent Hotel is in the very center of the Crescent, but since it was early, we skipped stepping inside for a quick peek.

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