Fun things to do in Somerset

  • Evening reception at the Baths
    Evening reception at the Baths
    by toonsarah
  • Gough's Cave with Cheddar Man in the background
    Gough's Cave with Cheddar Man in the...
    by alancollins
  • Gough's Cave
    Gough's Cave
    by alancollins

Most Viewed Things to Do in Somerset

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    Glastonbury

    by grayfo Updated Apr 17, 2014

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    Glastonbury is both a thriving market town and a major tourist attraction that is also known as the venue for the annual Glastonbury Festival. The town is also reputed to have had the oldest Christian Church in England and has been a place of pilgrimage and spirituality for centuries that still attracts visitors of all faiths. Must see sights include: Glastonbury Tor, Glastonbury Abbey, The Tribunal and The Chalice Well to name but a few.

    September 2013

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    Street

    by grayfo Written Feb 2, 2014

    Street is the home of a famous shoe industry that was founded there in 1825 by a local Quaker family, the Clarks. Street is also probably the largest village in England, if not Europe, and its borders extend from the Rive Brue (its border with Glastonbury) and up to the north slopes of the Polden Hills. Must see sights include: the Anglican Parish Church of the Holy Trinity and the Quaker Friends Meeting House.

    September 2013

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    Weston-super-Mare

    by grayfo Written Dec 27, 2013

    Weston-super-Mare is a seaside resort that first became really well known in Victorian times when visitors began arriving from the nearby cities of Bristol and Bath, the improved transport links with the long awaited arrival of Brunels Bristol & Exeter Railway in 1841 brought even more tourists. Although the town has an impressive sandy beach it is let down by the extremities of the tide, for the majority of the day the tide is so far out that to get to the sea once has to trapse through deep black mud, not only is it not recommended but it can be extremely dangerous. Must see sights include: the Grand Pier, Knightstone Island, the SeaQuarium and the Big Wheel to name but a few.

    September 2013

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    Shepton Mallet

    by grayfo Updated Nov 20, 2013

    Shepton Mallet is a historic market town that mixes old and new; it is a combination of the old market town and the new indus¬trial town, located on the western edge of the Mendip Hills, Somerset. Must see sights include: the market cross, the Shambles and the Parish church of St Peter and St Paul to name but a few.

    September 2013

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    Wells

    by grayfo Written Nov 5, 2013

    Wells is a cathedral city (known as the smallest in England) in the county of Somerset, and lies on the southern edge of the Mendip Hills. Wells has had city status since 1205 but was only actually confirmed and formalised by Queen Elizabeth II by letters patent issued under the Great Seal dated 1 April 1974. The city is named after the three springs (or wells) two within the grounds of the Bishop’s Palace and the other now a monument in the market square. Must see sights include: the Bishop’s Palace, Wells Cathedral, Vicar’s Close, the Town Hall and the Church of St Cuthbert to name but a few.

    September 2013

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    Cheddar

    by grayfo Written Oct 3, 2013

    Cheddar is a large village in Somerset that is mostly known for Cheddar Gorge and Cheddar Cheese, also less known are the Cheddar Strawberries. Must see sights include: Cheddar Gorge, Gough’s Cave, Cox’s Cave, Jacob’s Ladder and the market cross in the centre of the village.

    September 2013

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    Burnham on Sea

    by grayfo Written Sep 27, 2013

    Burnham-on-Sea is a town located at the mouth of the River Parrett and Bridgwater Bay. The town offers miles of sandy beaches with donkey rides, sandcastle making or taking in the views of Bridgwater Bay and the Welsh coast. Must see sights include: the shortest pier in Britain, the Lighthouse on legs, St Andrew's Church and the Esplanade to name but a few.

    September 2013

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    Bath

    by grayfo Updated Sep 19, 2013

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    Nestled in the valley of the River Avon and surrounded by seven wooded hills, Bath is largely built from the golden, locally quarried limestone. The town is a unique city; its hot springs, Roman Baths, splendid Abbey and Georgian stone crescents have attracted visitors for centuries. Set in rolling Somerset countryside, just over 100 miles west of London, it is a beautiful and unforgettable place to visit. Must see sights include: Bath Abbey, Pulteney Bridge, the Roman Baths and the Royal Crescent to name but a few.

    February 2010

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    • Historical Travel

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    Just a good day out

    by RogerLB Updated Jun 28, 2010

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    Clovelly is a small coastal village on the North Devon Coast which I visited from my Exmoor base (See travelogue) It is unique in that it is a privately owned village and little has changed in 150 years except the introduction of water & electricity supplies.

    There is plenty to see here, places to stop for a meal and a drink, boat trips from the small harbour and some spectacular views.

    There is no traffic allowed in the village and donkeys and sleds are used for the movement of goods. Several cottages are open to the public, Including the Charles Kingsley Museum.

    I would recommend it as a very good day out.

    Clovelly - Traffic free cobbled road Clovelly - Visitor Centre Clovelly - view from Mount Pleasant Clovelly - Fishermans Cottage - Circa 1930 Clovelly - The harbour
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    Bath

    by himalia11 Updated Mar 14, 2010

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    Bath is a town about 20 km from Bristol. As the name suggests it's known for its baths. Already the Romans built the baths and you can visit these Roman Baths where people bathed nearly 2000 years ago. You can't bath there today, but there's a Thermae Bath Spa not far away.

    We unfortunately only spent one night in Bath (in a great B&B called Athole Guest House!), and the Roman Baths already were closed when we arrived. But we enjoyed a nice stroll through the town, passing the Pulteneye bridge that reminded me a bit at Ponte Vecchio in Florence as it also has shops on the bridge. We then walked along the river Avon which was nice, too. Bath definitly is a place where you can spend a couple of days and I'm sure I'll come back!

    Bath - at the river Avon Bath cathedral
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    Dunster

    by himalia11 Updated Mar 14, 2010

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    Dunster is a town at the eastern edge of the Exmoor National Park. It's a town with small streets and several shops, restaurants and cafés. Above the village you'll find Dunster Castle. There had been a castle since the Norman times, and the castle was home of the Luttrell family for more than 600 years. Today it belongs to the National Trust.
    Another sight in Dunster is the Old Yarn Market from 1609 that cannot be missed as it's directly at the main street. This is a small covered place, used as a market for the sale of local broadcloth and homespuns.

    There also is an Exmoor Visitor Centre in Dunster where you can get helpful information on the region. There's a car park near that Visitor Centre at the entrance of the village and one near the castle, however for some reason we missed them and instead parked on a small car park (1 hour £0,80, 2 hours £1,20, 4 hours £2,10, all day £3,20) at the other end of the village.

    Old Yarn Market Dunster castle Church of Dunster
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    Bossington & North Hills near Minehead

    by himalia11 Written Mar 14, 2010

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    Minehead is a town at the border of the Exmoor National Parks in the west of Somerset. Also it's where the South West Coast Path starts. From Minehead a street goes up to the North Hills and Bossington Hills, with several view points from where you have great view on the Bristol Channel and the hills inland. And I loved the combination of these yellow flowers and the violet heather, although it's probably even more impressive if you come earlier the year if everythings is in blossom!

    We had asked in the Exmoor Vistior Centre in Dunster about this place and got a free map of Minehead and a good explanation so that we could find it although it's signposted pretty late in Minehead. We stopped at several places, and also saw some wild horses. About 6 km from Minehead the street ends and you reach the Bossington Hills car park. The view from there on Porlock Bay is fantastic! There are several paths that you can take and it's also a perfect place for a picnic. You have to drive the same way back, there's no other way back.

    View on Porlock Bay Wild horses on the way to Bossington Hills
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    Cheddar Gorge

    by himalia11 Written Mar 14, 2010

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    The Cheddar Gorge is a nice gorge with limestone cliffs. It's found near the village Cheddar (famous for its cheese) in the Mendip Hills. It's the largest gorge in the UK, being almost 5 km long and over 100m deep in places.
    The street B3135 goes through the gorge (with no foot walk) and we drove this winding street down to Cheddar. There are many car parks along the street, all pay & display (free Nov-Dec), that must be very busy in summer! When we were there, there only was an attendant at the lowest car park, however no matter if there's one or not you have to pay, either to an attendant or at the cashier. There are several caves and a museum that you can visit, there's a lookout tower and clifftop gorge walks and more - a pretty touristic place! As the weather was so nice that day we skipped a visit to the caves, and instead spent some more time walking in the Exmoor National Park later...

    The caves & museum are open 10:30 - 17:00 (10:00 - 17:30 in July & August).
    Admission: 17,- £ adults, 11,- £ children.

    Cheddar gorge Cheddar gorge
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    Nunney Castle

    by himalia11 Written Mar 14, 2010

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    Nunney Castle is a large tower house and was built in the 14th century. The castle was modernised in the late 16th century, but was besieged in the Civil War and ruined by order of the Parliament. Today it's a ruined, sourrounded by water which makes it a picturesque place. The outer walls walls are still there and you can get inside but not climb up any floors as there's not enough left.

    The castle is located in the village of Nunney. It's not signposted but the village is so small that it's easy to find! It can be visited for free.

    Nunney castle Inside Nunney castle
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    Amazing Cheddar Gorge

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Nov 24, 2008

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    Once again, thanks to tips from various VT-members, I had heard about Cheddar Gorge before coming to England on this trip. It had both good and bad reviews and I was almost put off visiting it by a tourist pamphlet we picked up at our hotel in Bradford-on-Avon. It outlined various tourist attractions, caves, souvenir shops, etc. at the western end of the Gorge and reminded me of a few tacky tourist traps I have visited in my time. But, what the heck I thought, it was directly in our path so we may as well give the Gorge the benefit of the doubt!

    As it turns out, Cheddar Gorge, the largest in the United Kingdom, was quite impressive to our eyes, and a lot of others too - having been voted in a 2005 poll as the second greatest natural wonder in Britain. This gorge in the Mendip Hills (see my 'General' tip for its location) is unusual in that it was not formed by a permanent river. At the end of the last Ice Age, the limestone rocks of these hills were frozen solid, causing the melt waters from the retreating glaciers to carve out this 113-m (370-ft) deep path to the Ocean. With the passing of the Ice Age, the rocks thawed out and resumed the normal characteristic of limestone, which is to absorb any water or rainfall into fissures and deep cracks, forming underground rivers and caves instead of surface rivers. The resulting Cheddar Cave, at the bottom end of the now dry Gorge is where the oldest human skeleton in Britain was discovered, with the age estimated at ~9,000 years. This is also where the small area of tourist attractions is located - it was not so bad after all as we drove past !

    Looking Back at Our Route into the Gorge Descending Further Into the Contrasts
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Somerset Hotels

See all 400 Hotels in Somerset
  • Apsley House Hotel

    One of the finest guest houses in Bath. The ideal place to take someone special for a treat... Not...

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  • Wessex

    High Street, Glastonbury, BA16 0EF, United Kingdom

    Satisfaction: Very Good

    Good for: Couples

  • Best Western Swan Hotel

    There's one thing that makes you feel right at home in a foreign hotel. Someone speaking your very...

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Top Somerset Hotels

Weston-Super-Mare Hotels
57 Reviews - 82 Photos
Bath Hotels
915 Reviews - 2013 Photos
Minehead Hotels
23 Reviews - 65 Photos
Glastonbury Hotels
138 Reviews - 436 Photos
Yeovil Hotels
17 Reviews - 10 Photos
Taunton Hotels
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Cheddar Hotels
29 Reviews - 102 Photos
Wells Hotels
94 Reviews - 316 Photos
Porlock Hotels
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Wilton Hotels
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Frome Hotels
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Dunster Hotels
10 Reviews - 26 Photos
Crewkerne Hotels
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Clevedon Hotels
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Bruton Hotels
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Somerset Things to Do

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