Fun things to do in Sheffield

  • Cathedral Church of St Marie
    Cathedral Church of St Marie
    by Skillsbus
  • Cholera Monument Grounds, Sheffield
    Cholera Monument Grounds, Sheffield
    by spidermiss
  • Winter Garden, Sheffield
    Winter Garden, Sheffield
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Sheffield

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    Don Valley Stadium

    by suvanki Updated Jul 31, 2013

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    The Don Valley stadium is situated in Attercliffe, in the city's East End. Previously the main area for steel production, but with the decline in Sheffields Steel Industry, this area has been regenerated as a leisure area.

    To its side is the Don Valley Bowl, then the Motorpoint Arena, the former Hallam FM Arena (indoor venue for concerts etc), opposite this arena is Centretainment (a large complex housing a multiplex cinema, many restaurants and fast food outlets plus Bowling Alley)

    Don Valley Stadium is one of the Uk's' best sporting and leisure centres, opened in 1991 for the World Student Games, it has attracted controversy in that the 147 million pound bill for the cost of the games (with 29 million being spent on this stadium) was picked up by the citizens of Sheffield.

    Home to the Sheffield Eagles (Rugby League), and a venue for other sporting events such as prestigious Athletics events, concerts and TV programmes (The Games). and .BritBowl XXVI (26) – the British American Football Association National Leagues Championship was also played here

    I've visited this stadium on quite a few occasions, mainly as a spectator for athletics events during the 90's where I saw some of that decades finest sportsmen and women, such as Linford Christie, Roger Black, Frankie Fredericks, Merlene Ottie, (Dame) Kelly Holmes, Jan Zelezney, Steve Backley etc.
    I've also run the Race for Life partly in this stadium 4 times (an annual 5km charity run for Breast Cancer) And it was especially great to know that I was running on the track that some of my sporting heroes had covered! The Sheffield Half marathon ends here too.

    This is where our Golden Girl, Jessica Ennis (now Jessica Ennis-Hill) started her steps to Gold Medal victory!

    There is a gym here, open to the public - Come and train next to the Pros'!

    Nearby, is the English Institute for Sport, where international athletes come to train - again, the gym and facilities are open to the public.

    Don Valley has also hosted some big name concerts including The Rolling Stones (twice), I saw them (free) at their latest visit, Bon Jovi (Yes, I was there too) Red Hot Chili Peppers, Michael Jackson and U2 (another free view from outside!)

    One of the hi lights of 2012, was going to Don Valley on the evening of Saturday 4th August, to watch some of the events of the London Olympic Games. A Big Screen had been erected, and admission was free.
    A great atmosphere (although the turn out wasn't what I'd expected - a bit disappointing) especially as this was to become 'Super Saturday' We saw Rutherford, Farah, then Ennis winning gold!

    UPDATE Sadly, This stadium is to be demolished at the end of the year, as a council cost cutting exercise!
    READ ALL ABOUT IT

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    Street Art in Sheffield

    by suvanki Updated Jun 14, 2013

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    During the 80's and 90's I noticed more and more buildings in the city being defaced by graffiti. Spray paint tags were cropping up everywhere, adding to the general feeling that Sheffield was dying.
    Then Banksy came along....



    Recently, wandering around the re-generated Kelham Island quarter of Sheffield, I came across a stunning work of art on the river banks below the Riverside pub. I took a quick photo of it, but as there was a torrential downpour at the time, I didn't linger to take moore shots.

    Telling my work colleagues about this, one suggested it might be the work of Kid Acne, who is a well known Sheffield Street Artist. After some research, I found this was in fact, the work of Phlegm- who hails from Wales, but is (was?) based in Sheffield.
    Driving and wandering around Sheffield, I came across more examples of his impressive work.

    For a short while I forgot about these (Busy travelling/working etc), but this week, having come across some more street art, I was curious to find more examples.

    A search on Google led me to a short diversion on my way home from work, to Sidney Street and Sylvester Street, where, despite the rain, I enjoyed wandering amongst derelict buildings, snapping some of Phlegm, Kid Acne and other street artists work.(Hopefully, I'll find out who these are, because there were some great pieces).
    I was looking for the former APG building, as it had a piece of Phlegms work there. For some reason, I had it in my head that this was on the facade of a 1960's building (from the print off I had c/o my Google search), so was expecting to see it from the street. Disappointed that I hadn't found it, but chuffed with my other discoveries on this street, and the lane behind Niche night club, with it's derelict buildings and walls that were covered in street art, including the work of Phlegm and Kid Acne, I left and went home.
    It was still niggling at my brain next day-How had I missed it? so driving home, I did another detour (negotiating some quirky one way roads) and parked up on Sidney Street.

    This time I struck Gold, Thanks to two gentlemen I came across outside the AVEC building (which was also covered in Street Art) - This building also housed a hidden gem, which I'll cover in one of my off the beaten tracks tips later, and this chance meeting led me to learn of a web site, that is dedicated to Sheffield Street Art, and I was pointed in the direction of the piece that I was looking for, which was housed through a gateway of an original 'Little Mesters ' yard - so, not a Facade at all, but a painting in the arched entranceway.

    Oh, think I've got a new hobby here, finding and photographing local Street Artists work, and learning all about it, and the artists.

    Now discovered Rocket01 painted Charles Darwin (pic4) and pic 2....... another artist to learn more about!

    June 2013
    Well, I've now found plenty more examples of Street Art over the past year or so. Rocket01 has added a portrait of David Attenborough to a wall on Charles Street, and his partner Faunagraphic was commissioned to create a portrait of Harry Brearley in commemoration of the Centenary of his invention of Stainless Steel. Phlegm has a new commissioned piece above the Arundel Street entrance to the Millennium Galleries.

    As part of Sheffield Environment week, I joined a free walk 'Paint The City', where I discovered some new pieces/ hidden places.

    Sheffield is now recognised as one of the leading cities for street Art, with visiting artists leaving their mark.

    The site on Sidney Street, often changes, with new artists displaying their work.
    I particularly enjoy wandering around the streets and narrow lanes around this area, Arundel Street/Eyre Street and elsewhere, discovering new pieces.

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    Spotting Sheffield Peregrine Falcons

    by suvanki Written Jun 14, 2013

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    For the past few weeks, there has been quite a bit of interest around St Georges Church, due to a pair of Peregrine Falcons, known as George and Mildred, returning to the nesting platform, which was placed here by Sheffield University in 2010.

    In 2012, they bred here for the first time, and in March 2013, a web cam was positioned by the platform, by the University Estates department, serving as security for the birds/eggs and to provide live coverage of events.

    I only became aware of these falcons, after coming across a thread on the Sheffield Forum , which had a link to the webcam, and it wasn't long before I was hooked! Every morning and evening, and in between times when possible, I've been checking the latest happenings.

    Over Easter, the first eggs appeared, with 4 being laid. and about a month later, 3 of the 4 chicks had hatched. It was quite fascinating, watching the parents taking it in turn to incubate the eggs.

    The webcam has a warning that it is unedited, and that there may be disturbing images at times - yes, the adults are regularly seen flying in/out with fresh pigeons or starlings, that are fed to the chicks.

    The past few weeks have shown how quickly the bundles of downy 'fluff balls' have developed into fledgings, and over the past few days have taken their maiden flights.

    A couple of evenings ago, I wandered down to St Georges for a 'look see' on my way home from work . The nesting platform is high up on the Broad Lane side of the tower. I hadn't got my binoculars, but could see one of the birds on a ledge, and some flapping of wings from the platform. There were a couple of others (with binoculars) who appeared to be 'regulars' Apparently larger groups are often gathered here.

    The BBC 'Springwatch' programme featured these falcons last night, and there has been some local and national media interest. Guardian article

    The Sheffield Bird Study Group have an interesting blog - see link below for regular updates.

    Car park on Broad Lane and outside Hendersons/old Jessops Hospital

    St Georges is now used as the University Lecture Theatre and Post Graduate student accommodation (since 1994)
    The church was built in 1821, consecrated on 29th June 1825and closed in 1981. It had seating for 2,000. The foundation stone was laid on 19th July 1821, on the day of the Coronation of King George 1V - hence, St Georges!

    St Georges cost £15,181 to build, the equivalent of £1,050,000 today.
    This was one of Four 'Million pound Churches' built in the city. St Marys, Bramall Lane, St Phillips, Netherthorpe and Christ Church, Attercliffe (destroyed by bombing raid in WW2 and now demolished) being the other three. These were built/ paid for by the Church Building Commission, an Anglican group, in response to the increasing attraction for non-conformist religion. John Wesley and others regularly preached in Sheffield, attracting large crowds, particularly in the poorer areas.

    During the 1980's/90's, this was a bit of a 'no go area' at night, as it was part of the Red Light Area, but it's been cleaned up since.

    My photos are a bit dark, but hoping to take some more over the next few days.

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    Old Queens Head Public House

    by suvanki Updated Mar 27, 2013

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    This pub, in the bus station/Transport Interchange is considered to be the oldest surviving domestic building in central Sheffield. It looks a bit out of place amongst the modern urban architecture of the transport interchange, but it is worth a visit -

    Blimey it's survived the bombings of WW2 and the councils regeneration programme - Hoorah!!

    The Queen in its title refers to Queen Mary, who was imprisoned at Manor Lodge for 14 years. The ruins can be seen a couple of miles away from here on Manor Lane.

    The Grade 11 listed building dates back to 1475. it is commonly thought that this might be the site of the castles laundry or wash - house, but the ornate carvings on the exterior would disprove this! Local historians think that this was more likely to have been a banqueting hall.

    It is the last example of a timber framed medieval building from the era. It was originally known as 'The Hawle in the Pondes', and would have been surrounded by fields and the riverside. Fishing ponds here would have provided recreation for the nobility - not just fishing, but hunting water fowl etc, which would be cooked and served in 'The Hawle' - along with 'lashings of ale' etc.
    The building was restored in 1949, and has since undergone many refurbishments.

    If you look outside at the front of the pub, under the windows, You'll see some of the original foundations.

    On one of the beam ends is a carving of a Queens Head. (pic 3)

    An adjacent building opened as a Public House , called The Queens Head in 1840, and 22 years later, expanded into this present site.

    For many years there have been stories of a tunnel leading from this hostelry to/from Manor Lodge, that Mary QOS used. Well, it is quite unlikely ............. Having visited the cellar (part of which is thought to date to the 17th Century) of the pub with some members of 'Friends of Sheffield Castle' and 'Friends of Manor Lodge' we were shown the supposed entrance/exit of the tunnel - a rectangular opening, that a child used to climbing chimneys or crawling through mines might just be able to negotiate!

    It is a popular pub, served by the Thwaites Brewery. A mixed crowd can be found here- those waiting for their bus/coach, workers, regulars, Ghost walk groups, local history groups etc
    Quite traditional -ie not 'theme barred' Atmosphere varies!!
    There are framed photos of old Sheffield workers/buildings etc. Look at the cases of articles found during restorations of the building as well as articles about the history of the Old Queens Head.
    Original beams (with some newer pieces) and fire place.

    Would you be surprised to hear that it's haunted?

    Due to its location in the bus station/near the train station, it does sometimes attract the 'hard luck story tellers' who've got a variation on having lost their purse/wallet and need to travel to......... Often they just ask for a few coins, others try the 'worried parent, who'll send a cheque if you pay their bus/coach/train fare to London/Edinburgh/Newcastle etc etc'....
    It's always felt like a safe pub, but again keep an eye on your bags etc.

    A large Central bar, serves an assortment of beers (Thwaites beers on tap), House wines, spirits, soft drinks, tea/coffee etc.

    There's a dining room off the bar area. Food served daily-All Day Breakfast/pies/roasts/lasagne/curry/burgers etc....' traditional English pub grub' -Not Gastro-pub. Reasonable prices.

    UPDATE - The pub is under new management - a charming couple from Czech Republic have taken over the reigns. There is a new menu - starting April 2013, with an enticing selection of meals at very reasonable prices. I'm particularly looking forward to trying the Czech selection!

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    Is it One o'Clock in the City?

    by suvanki Updated Mar 23, 2013

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    Well after living in Sheffield for nearly 35 years, I was surprised to find out (a few days ago) about this tradition that has been carried out daily in the city centre since 1874. Apparently there are many others that don't know about this when I asked around my work colleagues.

    So, head towards the corner of Leopold Street and Barkers Pool just before 1300 hours and wait - at precisely 1 o'clock a siren wails out! (I'd headed here specially today, but arrived too late - next time!!!)

    If you look upto the windows above HL Browns jewellery shop (previously Wilson Pecks music store) in the Yorkshire House building, you'll see a notice- 'One 0'Clock Time Signal'

    Apparently this used to be on the old HL Browns shop which used to be on the opposite side of the road (Orchard Square entrance).

    So why does Sheffield have this daily ritual? Well apparently it was the signal for city workers to return to their work!
    It was also used for the citizens to re-set their clocks/ watches due to its accuracy - apparently the Town Hall clock and bells are about 30 seconds behind the siren.

    I headed into town a few days ago and heard the siren - I can't understand why I've not heard this before - it's quite loud!

    For another time related thing to see/hear - in Orchard Square is an ornamental clock that chimes and the doors open to reveal a Buffer Girl and a Little Mester making knives. I think that this is each half hour, but I'll check my facts - it's quite a while since I last saw this clock in operation. I remember when it arrived here, a small crowd would gather to watch the doors open and the figures move.

    While I was looking for the siren, I spotted something else that I'd not seen before - a stone plaque high on the wall 'Cabinet Maker to HRH The Prince of Wales' ....

    Well I now know that Yorkshire House was built between 1883/84 by Flockton and Gibbs.It is an attractive four storeyed building. In 1892, the top floor and attic was added.

    Johnson and Appleyard (Founded 1879) were the cabinet makers with the Royal patronage. They were also responsible for the fittings in the Council Chambers of the Town Hall. In 1900 they won a gold medal at the Paris Exhibition.
    History of Johnson family and Appleyards

    For more information about Furniture manufacture of this era, please check the web page below

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    Old County Court Hall

    by Skillsbus Updated Mar 14, 2013

    The old County Court Hall was built in 1854 to a design by Charles Reeves.The courtroom was on the first floor and was unusual at the time of build. Inside the original cantilevered stome staircase survives.
    The court moved on 1996 and now the building is used as offices.

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    Sterling Works

    by Skillsbus Updated Feb 25, 2013

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    The site of Sterling works was formed following the Duke of norfolks plan for a residential area on Alsops Fields.
    In a plan dated 1794, the plot is recorded as leased to Thomas Drake and William Coldwell.
    Between 1797 & 1850 a two storey building with a barrel vaulted cellar was constructed along the west side of Froggatt Lane, followed bya range of workshops.
    By 1889 a range of workshops joining Butcher Works was constructed.
    By 1896 the building was occupied by Lockwood Brothers Ltd and used as a tool factory and power works.
    C.W.Fletcher silver forgers founded in the 19th century moved into Sterling works in 1908. By 1939 the silver trade was in decline and Fletchers diversified into making other items including parts for Rolls Royce Merlin engines.
    In 1999 Fletchers moved out of Sterling Works.
    In 2005 the works were purchased by Ruskin Mill Education Trust. By this time it was also a Grade II listed building and described as a near complete example of a Sheffield edge tool factory.

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    King Edward VII School

    by Skillsbus Written Feb 25, 2013

    Wesley College, a school to educate the sons of the laity, opened in 1838 in new buildings designed by William Flockton on Glossop Road, Sheffield, England. It was founded by Rev. Samuel Dousland Waddy (1804–1876) to “supply a generally superior and classical education, combined with religious training in the principles of Methodism” and was initially called the “Wesleyan Proprietary Grammar School”. The change in name to Wesley College seems to have taken place in 1844, when a “Royal Warrant, constituting the Sheffield Wesley College a college of the University of London was forwarded to Mr Waddy (subsequently Governor, from 1844 to 1862) by Sir James Graham, which empowered the college to issue certificates to candidates for examination for the several degrees of Bachelor and Master of Arts, and Bachelor and Doctor of Laws”. A year later it spurred Rev. James Gillman, William Ferguson, William Stewart and Thomas Waugh in Dublin, Ireland to consider creating a similar school in Dublin. The school accepted its first 90 boarders on 8 August 1838. By 1841 the number of pupils had increased to 172. In 1905 Wesley College was purchased by Sheffield Council and merged with Sheffield Royal Grammar School to form King Edward VII School (Upper School Site), named after the reigning monarch. The building is currently being refurbished, with the addition of a sports hall and science block, as part of the BSF programme

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    Wharncliffe Fire Clay Works

    by Skillsbus Written Feb 25, 2013

    Built for John Armitage and Son. Brick with elaborate terracotta dressings and decoration and hipped and gabled slate roofs with 2 ridge and single gable brick stacks.
    Armitage's home, No.91 Crookes Road, and its ancillary buildings, are ornamented in the same way with examples of his products.
    Built in 1888 these premises were used as a workshop and sales office for the various fire clasy products produced by John Armitage & Son.
    In Dec 1995 the building were Grade II listed.

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    Calvary Holiness Church

    by Skillsbus Written Feb 25, 2013

    Built in 1851 it was originally known as the Catholic Apostolic church, later it was renamed Calvary Holiness Church. In the early 1970's it was again renamed The Church of the Nazarene.
    This small and hidden away church is currently part of Sheffield University.
    The church is currently a disused, grade II listed building owned by the University. Despite the music department moving into the adjacent Jessop building and new, purpose-built SoundHouse, they are still lacking a space for performance. The vision is to adapt the empty church into a licensed performance space for music, which can become a home for music and a face for musicians to present their music to the city of Sheffield.

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    Sir Fred Mappin Building

    by Skillsbus Written Feb 25, 2013

    The Sir Frederick Mappin Building, or more familiarly, the Mappin Building, is a grade II-listed building on Mappin Street, Sheffield, England, named after Sir Frederick Mappin (1821–1910), the so-called Father of Sheffield University.

    The building is owned by the University of Sheffield, is in an area known as the St George's Complex (after the St George's Church building, also owned by the University), and houses much of the Faculty of Engineering. Departments based there are Mechanical Engineering, Civil and Structural Engineering, Electronic and Electrical Engineering and the division Aerospace Engineering. The building also houses St George's IT centre, an open access computer centre available to all university students during office hours. To the rear of the building is the Sir Robert Hadfield Building, home to two other departments: Chemical and Biological Engineering, and Materials Science and Engineering. A separate building, the Amy Johnson Building is home to the Dept of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering.
    The oldest part of the building is the former Technical School, the earliest purpose-built building for what is now the University of Sheffield. Designed by Flockton & Gibbs and completed in 1886, it now lies in the centre of the building. The extensive Mappin Street frontage was also designed by Flockton & Gibbs, in a far more demonstrative style. Work began on it in 1902, but progressed in three phases and was finally completed in 1913. This part of the building includes the main entrance, the John Carr Library and Mappin Hall. It is connected to the Technical School by a bridge. Part of the northern range along Broad Lane and a building behind the Technical School followed, then the connecting Engineering Building along Broad Lane, completed in 1955. This gradual accretion has produced a complex plan and floor numbering scheme: the main entrance is on floor D, with floors A,B, C and C* existing at lower levels in various areas of the building, and floors E, F and G lying above.

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    Ragged School

    by Skillsbus Written Feb 25, 2013

    Unfortunately so far i can't find out much information about this old Ragged School.
    The Ragged School Union was founded in 1844 by Lord Shaftesbury, with the aim of establishing "schools expressly for (the) destitute and depraved class, in the very localities, courts, and alleys where they abound." The more ambitious Schools developed into general educational and welfare institutions.
    Today this building is used as offices and has been renamed Bailey House.

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    Stanch

    by Skillsbus Written Feb 25, 2013

    A stone carving of a Pointer Dog, with the word STANCH inscribed beneath. The dog is outstretched and appears to be running, but often goes unnoticed situated as it is on this run down building on a side street. This is the Dog Brand trademark of J & Riley Carr Ltd the manufacturing company that occupied the building until the 1950's. The business was established by Riley Carr in 1806 in Bailey Lane but relocated to Herries Road South in 1954. Originally the company were concerned with merchanting steel and making steel and saw fenders but later manufactured saws, files and machine knives..

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    Rare surviving example

    by Skillsbus Written Feb 25, 2013

    This cutlery and silversmithing works were built in c1800. This Georgian works is now one of a small number of surviving city centre factories, which still has the distinctive functional architectural character of the early 19th century workshops.
    Anglo Works, was listed on 26 June 1973, at Grade II, at which point the building was in fair condition, given that Walter Trickett & Co. continued to occupy the building until 1989.
    Anglo Works, is a rare surviving example of a medium sized City Centre Metal Trades complex. The complex displays a functional architectural character typical of early 19th Century Metal Trades establishments. 27 Trippet Lane was formerly the Brown Cow public house, whilst 25 Trippet Lane was recorded as a stable block with Billiard Room over on the 1896 Goad Fire Insurance Plans. Both 25 and 27 Trippet Lane appear to have been absorbed into the Walter Trickett complex during the late 19th or early 20th Century and were converted to industrial use which appears to have continued until 1989.

    Today Anglo Works is made up of modern six bedroom apartments. Each apartment has a fully fitted kitchen and an open plan living area furnished with LCD TV, DVD, satellite TV and dining/coffee table. Each of the bedrooms is furnished with 3/4 beds. The complex has a secure electronic entry system.

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    The Sanctuary

    by Skillsbus Written Feb 25, 2013

    The Sanctuary in St James St. was originally built in 1860 as the Church of England Educational Institute,which was founded in 1839 for the education of young working adults.
    In 2012 more than £200,000 has been spent restoring and refurbishing the Grade II listed building,

    Special displays are on show inside dedicated to cask ale and Sheffield’s history.

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