Fun things to do in Sheffield

  • Cathedral Church of St Marie
    Cathedral Church of St Marie
    by Skillsbus
  • Cholera Monument Grounds, Sheffield
    Cholera Monument Grounds, Sheffield
    by spidermiss
  • Winter Garden, Sheffield
    Winter Garden, Sheffield
    by spidermiss

Most Viewed Things to Do in Sheffield

  • Skillsbus's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    North Church Street

    by Skillsbus Written Feb 24, 2013

    North Church street is one of those places that you just stumble across.
    While most of the buildings are fairly umremarkable those at No. 15-19 are all Grade II listed buildings.
    No.19 is probably the most interesting of the three. In need of abit of cleaning up dates from about 1830.
    The others are slightly newer and to a less grand design.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Skillsbus's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Paradise Square

    by Skillsbus Written Feb 24, 2013

    Paradise Square was built in the 18th century on the site of Hicks' stile-field, the stile being one of the entrances to the church-yard. The reason for the choice of the name Paradise Square is uncertain, but local historians R. E. Leader and S. O. Addy speculated that it may be an allusion to the ancient use of Paradise or Parvis as the name for a garden or enclosed space near a church. The area acquired the nickname Pot Square when crockery vendors were moved here from the High Street in around 1808.
    The east side of the square consists of five houses built in 1736 by Nicholas Broadbent on land leased from the trustees of the Shrewsbury Hospital. The other houses in the square were built by his son Thomas Broadbent, from 1771 to c.1790. Number 11 is dated 1787. Following bomb damage in the Second World War, parts of the square were extensively restored between 1963-6 by Hadfield, Cawkwell, Davidson and Partners, when numbers 18 and 26 were largely rebuilt using materials that were salvaged from buildings elsewhere. In the mid 1980s, an early 19th century Gothic revival stuccoed building at number 10 was rebuilt with a Neo-Georgian facade. All buildings in the square are Grade II* listed.
    The first recorded assembly in Paradise Square was on 15 July 1779 when John Wesley preached to what he would later note in his journal was "the largest congregation I ever saw on a weekday".The Methodist Conference commissioned a memorial to be placed in the square commemorating this event. This was designed by Alfred Tory, and unveiled in 1951 by J. Arthur Rank. John Wesley was not the only preacher to use the Paradise Square, Rowland Hill preached in the square on 26 September 1798.
    Paradise Square was also used by the chartists in Sheffield for a number of meetings, notably on 12 September 1839 when the crowd was dispersed by troops leading to a running battle and a number of arrests. Throughout the 19th century it was traditional that those standing for election to represent the Sheffield constituency in Parliament held political meetings in the square. The balcony at number 18 was removed in 1889, effectively ending the use of the square as a meeting place.
    Though the pottery market in the square was not long-lived, a number of the buildings in the square were used by glass and china dealers throughout the 19th century. Early residents of square were mostly from the Upper Middle classes, such as attorneys and physicians. Notable former residents include sculptor Sir Francis Chantrey, who had a studio here at No. 24 in 1802, and physician David Daniel Davis, who lived at No. 12 from 1803 to 1812. Through the 19th century there were a number of public houses in the square, including the Old Cock tavern at number 11 and Q in the corner inn at number 17. In recent years the buildings have been used as offices, though in 2008 numbers 7 and 9 were converted into a restaurant.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Skillsbus's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    Best kept secret in the city centre

    by Skillsbus Written Feb 22, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Perhaps the best kept secret in the city centre of Sheffield is St. Matthew's church situated in Carver Street. The church was built to serve a densely populated area of what we would now call 'Victorian slums', although if you talk to older members of the congregation who were brought up in the locality, it was almost heaven itself! The foundation stone of the church was laid on June 1st 1854, the consecration taking place on June 6th 1855.
    The church which has been described as "a neat building with a graceful spire" cost £3,297 to build, the main benefactor was the snuff maker Mr. Henry Wilson of Westbrook Mill who contributed £1,020, the Ecclesiastical Commissioners granted £200 and the Incorporated Church Building Society gave £250. The rest of the money was raised by Reverend Witty who was still asking for subscriptions for the last £200 in November 1856. In its early years the church had seating for 731 people which accommodated a large local congregation, the church being surrounded by a highly populated district of slum housing.
    In 1882 George Campbell Ommanney became the third vicar of St Matthew’s, he remained at the church for 54 years until his death in 1936. Ommanney was known as the “People’ Priest” and was close to the common people, he chose to live in the slums nearby to the church. He converted St Matthew’s into a focal point for teaching and practice of the Catholic Revival in the Church of England, he wrote his memoirs in the book “Ommanney of Sheffield“ in the final years of his life.
    The church celebrated its 150th anniversary in 2005. Since its foundation St. Matthew's has seen many changes and has had an interesting, and even distinguished history. A flagship of the Anglo-catholic movement offering rich elaborate ceremonial, today serving a bustling city centre, with a multitude of shops, offices, bars, restaurants and night clubs in its immediate proximity, a far cry from its surroundings 150 years ago when Mass was said to the accompaniment to the pounding of machinery in the nearby 'mesters' and small factories often making cutlery from Sheffield steel. St. Matthew's has survived many threats to its existence. During the Second World War it survived the bombing which ravaged the city, and, despite the war, the church was 'blacked out' so that worship might take place daily. Much of the surrounding area was lost or damaged. In August 1956 it survived a fire which damaged the organ, destroyed choir robes and damaged the Lady Chapel which had been restored merely two weeks previously. In the 1970's. Matthew's was again threatened, this time by redevelopment of the city centre, but plans for a proposed road were changed and the church and its buildings remain on the same site. In the next few years St Matthew’s will be in the centre of the new retail quarter and will be open daily for services, welcoming visitors and for those who want private prayer.
    There is an octagonal tower with a tall spire on top at the front (west) end of the church with the main entrance below on Carver Street. There are three main stained glass windows, the east window which dates from 1886 depicts the Incarnation and includes St Matthew and other saints in its design. It is by J. D. Sedding who re-designed the east end of the church at the same time, putting in a new chancel. The two west windows are by Lavers, Barraud and Westlake and date from 1902, other lighting in the church is by clerestory windows.

    The altar and reredos are also by Sedding with carvings by Frank Tory and a centrepiece painting of the Adoration by Nathaniel Westlake. The interior is richly furnished with many of the designs by Henry Wilson. The church organ dates from 1992, it is made in the classic British style by Martin Goetze and Dominic Gwynn and is based on the early work of master organ maker Bernard Smith. Next to the main entrance is a war memorial which takes the form of a plaque listing worshippers and parishioners who gave their lives in World War I. Just above the door is a statue of the Crucifixion. Next door to the church is St Matthew’s House, a former Clergy House and Sunday School.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Skillsbus's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    National School

    by Skillsbus Written Feb 22, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The NATIONAL SCHOOL, in Carver street, was built in 1812, and afforded instruction to about 260 boys, and 340 girls, on the Madras system. It was the central school of the Sheffield National District Society.
    A national school was a school founded in 19th century England and Wales by the National Society for Promoting Religious Education. These schools provided elementary education, in accordance with the teaching of the Church of England, to the children of the poor.
    Although a date has niot been found when the school closed down, the building has been in regular use, and is currently the Viper club.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Skillsbus's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    Mount Zion Chapel

    by Skillsbus Written Feb 22, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Erected in 1834-35, the Church closed in 1922, the congregation amalgamating with that at Broompark Congregational Church, Newbould Lane. The church itself was sold to Sheffield Royal Hospital which by that time surrounded it on three sides. The hospital was demolished in 1981. The front elevation of the church survives

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • suvanki's Profile Photo
    3 more images

    Tudor Square

    by suvanki Updated Feb 9, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Recently given a 'Make-Over', Tudor Square, named after Henry Tudor, is the largest Theatre complex outside London. The Crucible Theatre, Lyceum Theatre and Library Theatre are found in this square, along with the Central Library and Graves Art Gallery. It also has entrances to The Winter Garden/ Millenium Galleries.

    Around the 1700's Tudor Square was home to many 'Little Mesters' workshops. This Square has long been regarded as the Artistic centre of the city. There is evidence of an Atheneum and Assembly rooms. In the 1840's a school of Arts and Crafts (nearby, on the present site of Hallam University) was responsible for a renaissance of Arts and Crafts, which were admired nationwide. The school was succeeded by The Ruskin Gallery in 1985.
    John Ruskin admired Sheffield as a city 'where craftsmanship was still practiced as an art form'. He established an Art Gallery in Sheffield, and also sponsored Workers Education Classes for residents of Sheffield

    Tudor Square was created from a car park/ open space in the late 1980's, ready for the 1991 World Student Games.
    A stone plaque on the library Wall (pic 3) commemorates the opening of the square by Councillor, Doris Askham, the Wright Worshipful, The Lord Mayor Of Sheffield on the 7th June 1991
    Its most recent renovation, was timed to co-incide with the rejuvination of the Crucible Theatre.

    It now provides an interesting and attractive area (even on a rainy October evening, when this pic was taken)

    The artworks were created by Paul Mason and were funded by the J G Graves Charitable Trust (pic 3)
    " The stone wall, mosaics, railings and tree grilles celebrate early signs and symbols of communication amongst people From such marks all cultures developed different alphabets and languages"

    Near this plaque is a commemorative plaque to Thomas Boulsover, the inventor of Sheffield Plate

    As well as providing outdoor leisure space and an attractive entrance for theatre goers, or those attending the World Snooker Championships, it continues to provide an attractive thoroughfare between the Bus/Train Station, Hallam University, and the City Centre.

    The Starbucks in Tudor Square, was the first to arrive here in Sheffield. Two bars open onto Tudor Square- The Graduate (or whatever it's called this month)! Ha - It's now The Old Monk! and the former Ruskins Bar, which is now Crucible Corner (which is owned by the Crucible).

    Tudor Square is one of the venues for Fright Night - Europes largest Halloween Party! and other events such as 'Chance to Dance' which is held in May.
    An attractive Square, especially at night!

    Related to:
    • Theater Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • suvanki's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Fargate

    by suvanki Updated Jan 30, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Pedestrianised shopping area (since 1973) in the centre of Sheffield.

    Jarvis Cocker (Pulp) sang about meeting up in the year 2000 at the fountain....well it was THe Goodwin Fountain that used to be at the top of Fargate. Here no more!

    Fargate is located between Leopold Street/Pinstone Street (Town Hall) and High Street/Church Street - where another old Sheffield landmark is recorded in song -'Coles Corner' by Richard Hawley, a one time co-hort of Jarvis and Pulp. Coles Corner is where the HSBC is now.

    It is sandwiched between the cities 2 cathedrals - and was a medieval burial ground- Apparently medieval gravestones form the foundations of Fargate!

    With the arrival of Meadow Hell (sic) shopping centre in 1990, Fargate shops suffered, and many of the larger shops decamped to this new shopping mecca 3 miles away. In recent years trade has picked up, and its once again a busy arena for retail therapy. (hoorah!)

    A medieval well was discovered in 2005 by Sheffield University Archeologists in the foundations of a Victorian G2 listed building-Carmel House, at 57-63, Fargate (At the corner of Fargate and Norfolk Row). This was during renovation of the shopping area. Pottery and bones etc found here suggest that the well was in use by 1300 AD (possibly having been constructed at the same time as Sheffield Castle), and had been filled in around the time of the English Civil War.

    Four modern shop units were constructed behind the facade of the building, and the adjacent Georgian brick buildings, but the remaining architecture was demolished!

    There are some pieces of interesting architecture still - look above the modern shop fronts and You can see some interesting features.

    Above WHS you can see some carved stone figures including a pigs head (pic 5) which is a reminder of the time when the building housed a butchers shop. (it took me a few visits to spot this)
    The Yourkshire bank opposite the Town Hall was once The Albany Hotel, which dated back to the 1870's. Before this it was a Temperence house.

    Where The Goodwin Fountain used to be, was the site of some impressive monuments. An obelisk was created to celebrate Queen Victorias Golden Jubilee in 1887, when it had outstayed its welcome it was moved in 1903 a few miles away to Endcliffe Woods. Two Years later a statue of Victoria was sited here, only to join the obelisk in Endcliffe Park twenty five years later.

    The Goodwin Fountain was to be a feature from 1961 to 1998. Named in honour of Sir Stuart and Lady Goodwin. Goodwin was the founder of Neepsend Ltd - an important steel and toolmaking company. A young diabetic, his life was saved by insulin injections - He was one of the first to undergo the experimental treatment! Both he and his wife donated much of their wealth to local charities, particularly the city hospitals. They also funded the fountain to be enjoyed by the citizens and to honour Alderman James Sterland . However, it became known as The Goodwin Fountain.
    In the winter months, the fountain often froze. In summer months it was a place to cool down. I remember it being the 'target' for students during Rag Week to turn it into a bubble bath by pouring in washing up liquid and jumping around.

    The fountain in The Peace Gardens is now known as The Goodwin Fountain.

    Along with well known shops (Marks n Sparks, Next, New Look, H&M, Lush, WHS, Top Shop, Starbucks etc), 'Big Issue' Sellers, Buskers and sellers of tacky trinkets, there are fairly regular specialist markets.

    The European Market appears to be a regular event, which is well worth a visit!!

    St Patricks Day becomes a week of celebrations, with a marque/beer tent to join in Irish dancing and music.

    Until October 31st 2010, The Sheffield Wheel (pic 3) had become a landmark at the end of Fargate near the Town Hall, but it has been dismantled and moved to another city.

    Also at the top of Fargate is the main entrance to Orchard Square Shopping Court (pic 4), which opened in 1987, and was re-developed in 2008.

    Leading off Fargate are High Street , Church Street, Surrey Street, Leopold Street, Pinstone Street, Chapel Walk and Norfolk Row, which I'll hopefully cover soon!

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Skillsbus's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    Sheffield & Hallamshire Bank

    by Skillsbus Written Jan 28, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sheffield & Hallamshire Savings Bank was founded in 1818, largely due to the efforts of James Montgomery. Montgomery was a local journalist and poet. He was also a friend of the Revd Henry Duncan, who had set up the world's first commercial savings bank eight years earlier.
    Sheffield was a major centre for cutlery-making, and had been for centuries. One of its principal buildings was the Cutlers' Hall, and it was from here that the Bank first operated. Early business was brisk: within a year, 256 accounts had been opened, and £4,000 deposited.
    In 1860, the Bank moved to a very grand purpose-built office, designed by the architect T.J. Flockton. It was described as ‘one of the first buildings in the town centre with any pretension of elegance’. Flockton was also responsible for Sheffield’s Endcliffe Hall and the Mappin Art Gallery. The Bank building was extensively refurbished in 1974, when only the façade was retained.
    The original customer base of the Sheffield & Hallamshire had been dominated by steel workers. By the second half of the century, however, a large proportion consisted of artisans and female servants. The Bank’s trustees were interesting too, being drawn mainly from the ranks of local merchants and the professional classes. This was in contrast to the majority of savings banks, whose trustees came from the aristocracy and landed gentry.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Skillsbus's Profile Photo

    The Stone House

    by Skillsbus Written Jan 28, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The premises of the Stone House Public house is also listed although the pub has been closed for a few years and stands empty. In August 2005, London & Associated Properties bought the Stone House for £2,500,000 and plan to incorporate it within the nearby Orchard Square shopping centre which they own. This will create 42,000 square feet (3,900 m2) of redeveloped space.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Skillsbus's Profile Photo
    3 more images

    Cairns Chambers

    by Skillsbus Written Jan 28, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Church Street was originally named Church Lane.
    Cairns Chambers built between 1894 and 1896. They were designed by Charles Hadfield in Tudor Gothic style for the solicitors Henry & Alfred Maxwell, the chambers have decorative exterior stonework by Frank Tory including a four foot statue of Earl Cairns, a former Lord Chancellor.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Skillsbus's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    Leah's Yard

    by Skillsbus Written Jan 28, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Leah’s Yard is a former collection of small industrial workshops situated on Cambridge Street in the city centre of Sheffield in South Yorkshire, England. Although now in a run down state, the building has been designated as a Grade II* listed building because of its importance as an example of Sheffield’s industrial heritage.
    Leah’s Yard was constructed in the early part of the 19th century as a works for the manufacture of shears and other hand tools. As was typical with small works of this type Leah’s Yard had many different trade occupants and as such the building underwent many alterations and additions which are evident today. Throughout the 19th century the yard was used by a horn dealer (who supplied the cutlery handle making trade), Sheffield platers, knife manufacturers and silver stampers. In the 1880s the building was known as the Cambridge Street Horn Works. In 1892 Henry Leah took over the building as a producer of die stamps for silverware, giving the building the name that it is known by today. Sharing the building at that time was Walter Walker & Co Ltd who were piercers and stampers and the building was alternatively known as the Cambridge Stamping Works.

    At the end of the 19th century steam power was introduced to run a grinding hull and drop hammers in a silver die stamping shop. The key to the success of buildings such as Leah’s Yard was that they could be adapted to provide accommodation for a number of different metal industry trades on the same site. They provided adaptable, cheap work space by crowding buildings into a confined area. By 1905, the workshops around the courtyard of Leah’s Yard were occupied by eighteen Little mesters whose trades included dram flask manufacturer, hollow ware and silver buffers, palette knife makers, steel fork manufacturer, silver ferrule maker, brass and nickel silver turners, electroplate producer and a cutler.
    The front of the Leah’s Yard building which faces onto Cambridge Street has a carriage entrance within it, this opens up into a small rear courtyard surrounded by small two and three storey brick workshops. There are external wooden staircases to give access to the upper floors and large casement windows to give plenty of natural light for the workmen.
    Today Leah’s Yard stands in a derelict state, it has not been used for over 20 years when the lower floor was used as a shop. The building is located between two public houses on Cambridge Street, The Benjamin Huntsman and The Sportsman. The Benjamin Huntsman was constructed recently with older buildings being cleared to make way for the pub. The Leah’s Yard buildings were left standing because of their listed building status and it is now planned to restore and refurbish them as part of the Sevenstone development of the city centre. However because of central Government cutbacks work on the Sevenstone project has been postponed until 2011 at the earliest.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Skillsbus's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    Bethel Sunday School

    by Skillsbus Written Jan 28, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In 1852 the Primitive Methodists raised the cash for this school. It could accommodate 500 scholars and was responsible for the education of thousands of Sheffield children in the days before the Education Act which was passed in the early 1870s.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Skillsbus's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    Salvation Army Citadel

    by Skillsbus Written Jan 28, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In 1892 plans were discussed for the purchase of land and the erection of a 'commodious building,' culminating in the site at the corner of Cross Burgess Street being bought from the Corporation by the Army for the sum of £7,812. This was regarded as an excellent investment by the business fraternity of the time. On September 12th, 1892 the Foundation Stone was laid by Mrs. Bramwell Booth and the impressive building was opened on January 27th, 1894. Thus began over 100 years of almost unbroken service on this famous and much-loved site.

    The total cost of the work on the corner site was about £25,000 of which only £7,500 was used in the erection of the Citadel itself. The rest was spent on the building of the shops on Pinstone Street, which was to become one of Sheffield's main shopping areas (Incidentally they still own quite a lot of the land in the city centre). There is 'SA' lettering which can still be seen in the stonework above the shops.

    The new hall had a seating capacity of 1800 and in many respects resembled a theatre, with a tiered platform at one end and on the other three sides a groundfloor, gallery and a top balcony. The platform could be seen and heard from any part of the building. The walls were sage green with a deep maroon dado. The floor was paved in mosaic style. The ceiling was panelled and finished with specially prepared paper and the walls and pillars - as you might expect - had a lot of yellow, red and blue in them. There were also plenty of downstairs rooms.

    Despite the major renovations of 1957-58, the building at Cross Burgess Street was starting to show it's age and maintenance was continuously needed. The early 1970s were marked by discussions as to what should be done. Several options for alternative premises were considered and rejected. As well as questions about if we should refurbish or move, the cost of either option was substantial.

    By 1992 the situation was becoming critical and a detailed study was made of the existing building, showing the large amounts of money needed. Whilst recognising that the building no longer met the future needs, many were emotionally attached to this site which had such a significant history.

    Eventually the Salvation Army moved to new premises in 2000, and the building has been empty ever since. There have been many plans to convert the building into a pub/club (rejected as the licence was too restrictive), and now a shopping arcade, whilst retaining the original Grade 2 listed features (hopefully!). The building will need a lot of work doing to it owing to water ingress from the badly maintained roof, but it is still generally sound - no chav damage thankfully.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Skillsbus's Profile Photo

    An imaginary furnace

    by Skillsbus Written Jan 28, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Thistle sculpture In the courtyard of Sheffield Technology Park, the correct name is Heavy Plant! Officially "An imaginary furnace apparently erupting a bizarre spray of material, shards of glass and toolmakers offcuts"

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Skillsbus's Profile Photo

    Venture Works

    by Skillsbus Written Jan 28, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Built around 1791.
    Around 1840 the owners extended the building creating a courtyard containing a workshop, which, as they point out, exemplifies the conversion of homes to small factories that occurred during this period of Sheffield's history.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Sheffield Hotels

See all 60 Hotels in Sheffield

Latest Sheffield Hotel Reviews

Travelodge Sheffield Richmond
116 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 15, 2014
Hilton Sheffield
630 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 17, 2014
Mercure St Paul's Sheffield
960 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 16, 2014
Jurys Inn Sheffield
501 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 17, 2014
Sheffield Park Hotel
720 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 16, 2014
Premier Inn Sheffield (Meadowhall)
339 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 16, 2014
Etap Sheffield Arena
288 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 16, 2014
Kenwood Hall Hotel
526 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 18, 2014
Diplomat's Lodge
20 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Feb 24, 2014
Leopold Hotel
543 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 16, 2014
Park Inn Sheffield
83 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 1, 2014
Premier Inn Sheffield (City Centre)
484 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 16, 2014
Cutlers Hotel
223 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 18, 2014
Premier Inn Sheffield (Arena)
213 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 16, 2014
Hillsborough Hotel
40 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Mar 31, 2014

Instant Answers: Sheffield

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

93 travelers online now

Comments

Sheffield Things to Do

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Sheffield locals.
Map of Sheffield