Guildford Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in Guildford

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    Quakers Acre

    by gordonilla Written Oct 11, 2014

    Located in the town centre, the park acted a burial ground until it was handed to the borough in 1927. The park has various memorials and is in fact quite peaceful a short step away from the busy streets and Saturday market.

    Park (1) Statue Park (2) Memorial Memorial

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    Old Pottery Gallery

    by gordonilla Written Oct 11, 2014

    This was an interesting and free experience, it is located about the entrance and shop of the Watts Galley in Compton.

    During our visit the exhibition showing was "Faces of Compton" by local artist Emma-Leone Palmer.

    For further information on her work, try looking at:

    www.emma-leonepalmer.com

    studio@emma-leonepalmer.com

    +44 (0) 7830 070 833

    Exterior Interior (1) Interior (2) Exhibit (1) Exhibit (2)

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    Guildford Castle

    by gordonilla Written Oct 5, 2014

    There has been some refurbishment work undertaken and there is now a floor in the castle and you are able to visit it for a small fee. Sadly during our visit it was closed to the public, so we had to make do with staying outside in the grounds of the castle.

    Gateway Plaque Memorial Exterior (1) Exterior (2)

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    Guildford Museum

    by gordonilla Written Oct 5, 2014

    This is a typical town museum, outlining it's history from the earliest times to the more modern. The museum was running a WWI exhibition when we made out visit.

    Admission is free and they have a small shop at the entrance. They do not have any locker facilities.

    Interesting exhibits on the Denny brothers and the authors such as Lewis Carroll and Aldous Huxley.

    Signage (1) Entrance Exterior Signage (2) Plaque

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    Watts Chapel and Cemetery

    by gordonilla Written Oct 5, 2014

    "Watts Cemetery Chapel is a Grade I listed building which stands on Budburrow Hill in Compton near Guildford in Surrey. In May 1894 Compton Parish Council announced their plans to purchase this plot of land to use as burial ground. Four years later, on 1st July 1898, the Chapel was consecrated by the Bishop of Winchester and today it is still a working cemetery chapel.

    Visitors are drawn to the bright red brick of this Arts and Crafts masterpiece. Up close the extraordinary design and decoration both fascinates and overwhelms. Mary Watts (1849-1938) most likely had the vision to design, build and decorate the Chapel in 1891. George and Mary Watts had recently built Limnerslease in Compton, which became their winter residence.

    In November 1895 Mary began to run Thursday evening Terracotta Home Arts Classes at Limnerslease. At these classes Mary would instruct the local villagers how to model tiles from local clay with the beautiful and symbolic patterns that she had designed for the decorations on the walls of the Chapel.

    Through painting commissioned portraits, G F Watts financed the building of the Chapel and presented it as his gift to Compton. The architect consulted about its construction, and who designed the metal work on the doors, was George Tunstal Redmayne FRIBA (1840-1912).

    Mary was the artistic force behind the creation of Watts Cemetery Chapel and she dedicated it ‘to the loving memory of all who find rest near its walls, and for the comfort and help of those to whom the sorrow of separation remains’ " extracted from their web site.

    I have to admit is was a pleasant and quite location with both the chapel and the many graves old and new plus a memorial cloister. The one problem is that to walk from the gallery, you have to either walk on a narrow road with many vehicles or walk along a quite muddy track.

    Gate Entrance Ceiling Exterior G F Watts Memorial

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    Watts Gallery

    by gordonilla Written Oct 5, 2014

    I had seen a programme about G F Watts on television, and this prompted the visit on a very wet Saturday. However, it was a good choice and the weather was of no consequence.

    The gallery was opened in 1904 and then after many years of run down it was refurbished. It was reopened in 2011 by the Prince of Wales.

    There is a permanent collection, and during our visit there was an exhibition to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the marriage of, the actress, Ellen Terry to G F Watts.

    There are many paintings by Watts and a separate sculpture gallery.

    The staff are all volunteers and very friendly an approachable.

    Signage (1) Exterior (1) Signage (3) Interior + Tennyson Exterior (2)

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    Guildford Castle and Grounds

    by Jefie Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The stone tower of Guildford Castle was built during the 12th century. For a while the castle was one of England's most luxious royal residences, and under Henry III it became known as "The Palace". After only a few decades, however, it was left to fall into ruins. In 1885, it was bought by the Guildford Borough Council who turned what was left of the castle into a park. There is now a small museum in the tower, and the Castle grounds, a beautiful place to walk around and take pictures, are open to all free of charge.

    Guildford Castle, Surrey, UK
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    • Castles and Palaces
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    St. Mary's Church

    by Jefie Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Built in the mid-10th century, St. Mary's Church is the oldest surviving building in Guildford. The fact that it was built in stone is rather surprising considering that most parish churches of that period were made of wood. The original stone tower (circa 1050) still survives.

    That's me, taking a break in St. Mary's courtyard
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    Go for a walk on the countryside

    by Jefie Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    There are many walking trails in and around Guildford - some go as far as Canterbury if you feel like going on a full blown pilgrimage a la Goeffrey Chaucer, and others take you along the river and off to Surrey's lovely countryside where you can pretend for a moment to be one of Jane Austen's characters. So whatever sounds the most appealing to you, I would recommend stopping by Guildford's tourist information centre where you can get a free map of all the walking trails. Don't forget to ask the friendly staff to point out some of the interesting features along the way!

    View of the countryside surrounding Guildford
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    The Electric Theatre

    by Jefie Updated Feb 2, 2008

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    No matter what time of the year or what day of the week you are in Guildford, there's always something going on at the Electric Theatre! Whether you're interested in musicals, plays, comedy, music or dance, you should check out the theatre's program - you'll find quality entertainment at a very reasonable price. In our case, as we couldn't afford to go see a play in London, we went to see "The Diary of Anne Frank" at the Electric Theatre for only £7 and spent a very pleasant evening.

    Related to:
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    Guildford castle

    by annase Updated Jul 31, 2007

    Although there are no documents about the early years of the castle, it is almost certain that it was built shortly after the Norman Conquest in 1066 as it was customary to do in all the important towns to prevent rebellion and to strengthen the hold on the country. At the time Guildford was on an important route between London and the west of England. The first structures at the castle probably included the motte, surrounded by a ditch, and an adjoining bailey.

    There was a wooden tower on the mount for a look-out post. In the early 1100s a wall was built around the top of the mount. Later a tower with three floors was built. The first floor consisting of the main chamber, a chapel, and a wardrobe chamber with a latrine. The second floor had a two-seater latrine.

    Although the castle was used mainly as an overnight dwelling as the southernmost point of the Windsor hunting park and was visited on several occasions by the Kings John and Henry III, it was also used as an assembly point for Edward I's army.

    In the 14th century the castle was no longer needed and fell into disrepair. Today, the Great Tower is the only remaining structure. The tower was restored, and the grounds were opened to the public in 1888.

    In 2004 the Great Tower was conserved again, during which various original features were discovered. A roof and floor were re-instated at 1st floor level, and the ground floor now houses a model of the original castle c 1300 and interpretation panels tracing its history to the present day. There is a visitor platform on the roof offering panoramic views of Guildford. Unfortunately, there is limited disability access to the castle itself due to the steep castle mound and the number of staircases. The castle grounds and the garden are open all year round. The grounds house a pretty and quiet public garden where you can chill out and have a sandwich lunch.

    Opening times
    Apr-Sep 10am-5pm daily
    Oct & Mar 11am-5pm Sat & Sun only
    Closed between November and February
    Admission: Adults £2.30, Concessions £1

    Guildford Castle grounds The entrance to the grounds The Castle grounds
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    • Castles and Palaces
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    The riverside

    by annase Updated Jul 14, 2007

    The River Wey flows through the Guildford town centre and is one of the prettiest bits of the town. You can sit on a bench along on it or the nearby riverside pubs, if you don't fancy a walk.

    The river is located at the bottom of the High Street (cross the road). Soon the path comes out into a lovely open area, with lots of open grass land and seats, with narrow boats lining the banks of the river, a surprisingly rural scene considering the distance from the centre of Guildford. Later the path leaves becomes more of a tow path, with trees and buildings lining the river banks.

    The path leads all the way to Goldalming and alongside you would see a few locks and several narrow boats, since the river is navigable all the way to Godalming. Today, there is about 20 miles' navigable stretch on the river and there are 16 locks, which are all owned and maintained by The National Trust.

    Farncombe Boat House at Catteshall Lock in Godalming offers narrow boat hire from March to the end of October (at weekends and midweek). A day hire is rather dear (about £100) but if you are travelling with a big group, it's not too bad. No previous experience of steering a boat is needed as they will provide full tuition.

    Catteshall Road
    Surrey
    GU7 1NH
    Tel: 01483 421306
    http://www.farncombeboats.co.uk/
    email: enquire@farncombeboats.co.uk

    The riverside The riverside walk The riverside walk The riverside walk The bottom of the High Street
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    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Sights of Guilford

    by barryg23 Written Jun 24, 2007

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    We spent about an hour looking around Guildford before beginning our hike. It seemed like a typical Surrey town, with plenty of expensive cars and houses. The Castle Keep was impressive and there are good views over the town from its grounds and its gardens are beautiful. The shops in the High Street were the same as you’d expect in any British town, though it was an elegant street nonetheless with the standout building being the Guildhall, near the top of the street. You can’t miss the Guildhall’s huge clock hanging high above the street. The High Street slopes down to meet the River Wey, which we followed on our way to the North Downs Path.

    Guildford Guildhall Guildhall Clock Guildford Castle Keep Castle Keep Gardens River Wey

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    North Downs Way

    by barryg23 Written Jun 24, 2007

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    The North Downs Way is a long-distance walk in Southern England. It starts just east of the village of Farnham in Surrey and ends 153 miles to the east in Dover. Along the way there is superb scenery and excellent hiking trails. The path follows part of the ancient Pilgrims Way, a route used by pilgrims to get to Canterbury Cathedral.

    Guildford is a good place to start a walk on the North Downs Way, as the path fairly easy to find from the town. You follow the River Way south and turn off to the west after about 700 metres. Our walk took us from Guildford to Farnham, which is usually considered the first section of the North Downs Way. Near Farnham, we passed a wooden seat which marks the starting point of the North Downs Way (picture 2). For us, however, it marked the end point of a long but enjoyable day's hiking.

    North Downs Way Start point of the North Downs Way On the North Downs Way Woodland on the North Downs Way

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    Guildford Cathedral

    by annase Updated Jun 4, 2007

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    Guildford cathedral is a definitely a landmark of the town, as it is located on top of a hill known as Stag Hill, former hunting grounds of the Kings of England. It is not the most beautiful of cathedrals from outside. Its designer relied more on volume and mass than pretty ornaments. The outside of the building is entirely constructed from red brick signed by the members of the Royal family including the Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip. The cathedral was built between 1936 and 1961 and is the only new Anglican Cathedral built in the South of England since the Reformation.

    The interior is much prettier than the exterior. It is surprisingly light and spacious due to the use of the pale sandstone, numerous pillars, white Italian marble floor and the light flooding in through tall lancet windows. The incredibly long nave is equipped with wooden chairs, individually named in memory of local people.

    The Cathedral choir is one of a very few ensembles of its type to be founded in the 20th century. The choir has won an international reputation for its singing. The choir does not only regularly sing during the services, but they also record, broadcast, tour and organise concerts in the cathedral and elsewhere. In recent years the choir has toured in Denmark, northern France and Bruges and has appeared on several UK radio stations and released several CDs.

    Facilities include library, guided tours, restaurant, gift shop, book shop, disabled facilities, directions and parking

    Cathedral is open daily, all year round 08.30am-5.30pm
    Guided Tours: daily 09.40 - 16.00 (£3 per person)
    Refectory, Cafe, Restaurant are open daily 09.00 - 16.30

    The main entrance
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    • Religious Travel

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